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Our children have the right to an education.

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NameChange738676756 Wed 13-May-20 05:41:07

So many posts about whether schools will be safe when they reopen but I’m not seeing this point made. Lots of discussion around the childcare that schools provide and the importance on children socially.

My 11 year old has lost all interest and I can’t get him to do anything significant. We’ve had one zoom social with his teacher and classmates. So pretty much zero learning going on.

We know children are less susceptible and there is some discussion around whether they’re transmitting less. The children of key workers (i.e. the ones more likely to catch and spread it) have been at school the whole time and as far as I know there haven’t been massive outbreaks in schools.

So I think I just want to loudly shout: our children have the right to an education.

OP’s posts: |
golightlytoday Wed 13-May-20 05:45:39

In a large primary at the moment there are maybe 15-30 kids in total. So it is possible to manage social distancing. This is not possible with 1000+ kids in.

All children are in same situation. It is bad yes, and some schools are doing better than others.

At 11 they're year 6? They wouldn't have done much the last term anyway except school plays, trips etc. Be grateful there is no sats.

Teachers shouldn't have to be forced to face the situation with no ppe. Where it is impossible to social distance.

2 more months off will not ruin kids lives educationally. But it may kill them and their teachers.

HandfulOfFlowers Wed 13-May-20 05:46:41

Children have paid a very heavy price in all this. Mine will be back at school the moment they are allowed. I see a piece of my son ebbing away with every day this continues.

ParadiseLaundry Wed 13-May-20 05:48:30

I agree op. I actually can't believe so few people care about this. A few months ago too much screen time was thought of as massively detrimental to children's development. Now it's being hailed as a pretty much just as good as real interaction.

Flipflopflapflip Wed 13-May-20 05:48:51

Of course they do but not at any price and I think the cost is just too high at the moment.

Aramox Wed 13-May-20 05:50:19

Agreed. Mine’s an only and a teen, really missing the peer group. School has done no meetings at all, just sends worksheets- I cannot believe they can leave them like this til September.

echt Wed 13-May-20 06:01:17

A few months ago too much screen time was thought of as massively detrimental to children's development. Now it's being hailed as a pretty much just as good as real interaction

Has the UK government claimed this? Helpful hint: No.

School has done no meetings at all, just sends worksheets

Have you asked them why or are you like every single other parent who's posted about stuff like this and does fuck all?

Sostenueto Wed 13-May-20 06:06:08

You are the parent you sort out education via loads of things on line till it's safe for children and teachers to go back to school. Children are dying of Covid.

TiredMummyXYZ Wed 13-May-20 06:08:15

Children have a right to an education but not at any cost. Rushing them back to a classroom when it is not safe to do so is not the right thing to do right now. When infection and death rates are lower and schools have had more than a few weeks notice to plan and resource this then yes - send them back. But to do so now would be unsafe. If my children go back they risk they could come back and infect me (asthmatic) and my husband (diabetic). Can you imagine what that would be like? If I go back as a teacher I am not even allowed PPE! Even in France teachers have face masks and face shields. My school doesn’t have the staff to split classes in two. We only have one TA across the whole of our Key Stage 1! Schools need time to properly plan this - it can’t be rushed. The price is too high.

user1468766051 Wed 13-May-20 06:13:22

If you think schools will resume ‘education’ on June 1st your are wildly deluded. Mediocre childcare will be all you can hope for.
Many schools will have vastly reduced, highly anxious staffing. Many children will also be highly anxious and need continual reassurance and emotional support. ‘Education’ will be the last thing on anyone’s agenda!

superstressy Wed 13-May-20 06:13:56

Education starts at home love.

You're not doing much to motivate your child or you just want free childcare.

SarahAndQuack Wed 13-May-20 06:15:51

The children of key workers (i.e. the ones more likely to catch and spread it) have been at school the whole time and as far as I know there haven’t been massive outbreaks in schools.

They haven't, though, not all of them. My SIL is a keyworker (she works in ICU) and her son is at home with her while she's not on shift and with his dad when she is.

Lots of people haven't sent their children to school.

I do understand where you're coming from, but surely teachers also have a right to a safe work environment, and at the moment, it doesn't seem possible to provide.

nether Wed 13-May-20 06:17:24

Yes, theymdo.

So it is also important that schools continue to offer good quality offsite learning for those DC who are shielded (for as long as it takes for shielding to be lifted) and those with a shielded family member if the school is not able to guarantee social distancing (as the child might not in some circumstances able to return to the household with a shielding person)

The requirements of the most vulnerable should never be overlooked

Sobeyondthehills Wed 13-May-20 06:19:17

I do agree with you, my son is really starting to suffer from all of this, however he is not going to get much of an education if teachers are all off sick and/or they just quit.

Children might not get it all or very mild symptoms but they can pass it on and that is the worry for many teachers at the moment and I agree with them

Namenic Wed 13-May-20 06:20:14

Education does not have to take place at school. It can be very difficult to educate kids at home because cramped conditions, lack of connectivity to internet, age of children. Is there a way to improve the education of children at home?

kids have a right to access education. No one can force them to be educated though - just provide opportunities. In addition, what it interferes with someone’s right to Health/safe environment?

Biscuit0110 Wed 13-May-20 06:21:39

Yes they do. Particularly when they have lost so much time already. Thats all.

MaryQuaint Wed 13-May-20 06:23:04

Have you asked them why or are you like every single other parent who's posted about stuff like this and does fuck all?

I've asked the school and they say they're not engaging with students via video conferencing apps on the advice of teaching unions.

BovaryX Wed 13-May-20 06:24:16

2 more months off will not ruin kids lives educationally. But it may kill them and their teachers

golightly

What transformative event do you imagine is going to happen in two months time?

catnidge Wed 13-May-20 06:24:38

Yes, your child has a right to an education. Due to the current circumstances you are the educator.
As much as possible you need to implement learning at home. It doesn't have to be sit at a table learning all the time. Bake, weigh., measure items. Make a diary, go for walks discuss environment etc. It doesn't have to be Sat's type drill learning.

catnidge Wed 13-May-20 06:26:46

Safeguarding laws, are why there are no zoom style lessons.

If you can afford it you can buy CGP books online if you'd like a more formal lesson.

FirTree31 Wed 13-May-20 06:29:14

I agree OP. I understand teachers upset, but there are a few counter points to be made.
Surely HTs, DfE, schools, and teachers have been making plans to go back all along, they didn't expect the virus to disappear or be absent until vaccine found, as with all other types businesses and settings. This can't be a huge shock to the system.

I know a couple of families who are all key workers, supermarket employee, nurse, transport, carer... They have worked all along and cannot believe the fuss people are making, although I understand when you haven't been working or WFH it may be a worry.

I am very worried about my children's education, especially reading some of the teachers posts on MN, and also because it seems TAs will be leading some classes, who are not trained as teachers.

pipnchops Wed 13-May-20 06:30:05

YANBU children do have a right to an education, I don't think anyone would disagree, and this situation we all find ourselves in is just totally awful in so many ways. Everyone has different views on sending their children back to school so soon and I understand all of them, everyone is entitled to a point of view on whether it is too soon for them, their children and their particular set of circumstances. Some children are still getting a very good education at home and so for them it's maybe not worth the risk of going back to school. Education can happen anywhere, not just in school.

tinytemper66 Wed 13-May-20 06:30:29

I want to go back to school but in Wales it seems less likely that England. I am ready to face it; I have bought my own mask and am stocking up on hand sanitizer sprays and wipes in case I need them as I doubt that will be in rich supply.

I seem to be in the minority however. People are still scared to go out. We aren't even engaging in talks to plan. I have ideas but no one is asking me. I am a secondary school teacher and I really want to teach my Year 10s.

MorganKitten Wed 13-May-20 06:32:35

Lots of discussion around the childcare that schools provide and the importance on children socially.

It isn’t normally childcare

My 11 year old has lost all interest and I can’t get him to do anything significant.

As a parent you need to be making the rules, why aren’t you getting him to do work, if not set by the school use BBC bitesize.

So I think I just want to loudly shout: our children have the right to an education.

School staff have a right to safety.

Fortyfifty Wed 13-May-20 06:36:18

It's an interesting ethical debate to open up. At what point, if any, are we obligated to put the needs of children and young people first? What is the tipping point where we are keeping children isolated to potentially protect the greater community but their wellbeing, educationally and socially, is being impacted to too great an extent.

If schools and colleges can see no way of opening before the summer, what is going to be different come September?

I've personally hit my brick wall the past few days. Keeping positive for my slowly crumbling 17 year old is wearing. Buoying her up daily takes its toll and she's generally one of the motivated ones, with no preexisting mental health issues. But I am worrying about her constantly, because a 17 year old - pretty much imprisoned at home - is so far from what she developmentally needs. And she is up and down daily with emotions. And now we learn her 6th form college have deemed the building unsuitable to have Year 12 back before summer. The only hope of her college and many schools opening in September is to have the R rate down and testing and contact tracing in place. I'm angry to see photos of the packed underground trains. A second wave is going to set everything back again.

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