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To have jogged past dogs from behind??

(205 Posts)
cmac76 Fri 18-Oct-19 10:34:19

I know the topic of dogs/walkers/joggers is covered a lot on here but in this instance I'm wondering if I should have behaved differently so would appreciate opinions especially from other dog owners.

I have just come back from a jog in a nature reserve which is very popular with lots of people - dog owners, joggers, walkers, families etc. I was approaching a woman who was walking in the same direction as me (so I was jogging behind her) and she had 3 dogs off leads - one really large dog and 2 smaller ones. As I was approaching she moved over to one side to let me pass so I assumed all was fine and carried on past her. As I got further on I could hear her shouting so I turned around and could see all the dogs chasing me! I stopped still and all 3 surrounded me barking up at me so I couldn't move.

She carried on shouting but none of them came back to her so I asked her could she please put them on the lead and this is where she kicked off at me shouting that I should never run behind 'a pack of dogs' and 'would I run behind a horse?' I was very wtf at this point and unfortunately did raise my voice back which I do regret as it escalated and of course the dogs probably picked up on this and carried on barking at me. I pointed out how they are not horses, how I should be allowed to go out for a jog in a public place and how her dogs were not well trained if they couldn't be recalled - she got so irate at me and started to get quite close and in my face shouting that they were well trained and not dangerous as they were literally still barking at me and I couldn't move. She also yelled at me, "who the fuck do I think I am...do I think I own the fucking place"

Eventually she put their leads on and I carried on but felt I had to warn some mums coming in the other direction who had toddlers running loose as they were about to cross paths with her.

So Aibu for jogging behind dogs? Should I stop?? I know I was being unreasonable for getting into a shouting match with her but she was so irate from the moment I asked her to put her dogs on the lead. Am I making a mountain out if a molehill? They didn't actually bite me - just barked at me but I felt scared especially as there were 3 of them.

TeaStory Fri 18-Oct-19 10:35:31

She’s bananas.

TooTrueToBeGood Fri 18-Oct-19 10:36:46

She's an idiot. Her dogs were off lead and out of control. End of story.

AryaStarkWolf Fri 18-Oct-19 10:37:19

wtf? what else are you supposed to do? If her dogs can't be trusted around people they shouldn't be off lead. YANBU

*I'm a dog owner

sqirrelfriends Fri 18-Oct-19 10:38:00

She sounds unhinged

ThatMuppetShow Fri 18-Oct-19 10:38:20

She shouldn't have dogs if she can't control them. She is a very dangerous idiot.

Baguetteaboutit Fri 18-Oct-19 10:39:04

Yanbu. She is being an unreasonable idiot. If you can't control your dogs in a public space keep them on a fucking lead, it's that simple.

IfIHadAPenny Fri 18-Oct-19 10:39:21

Batshit. She wasn't in control of her dogs, you did nothing wrong at all.

adaline Fri 18-Oct-19 10:39:46

She's bonkers! I have a dog who would chase a runner so - shock - he's on the lead in places like that so I have total control over him.

You did nothing wrong.

Quellium Fri 18-Oct-19 10:39:55

I don't think you were unreasonable at all. She sounds awful and her dogs should not have been off the lead if she doesn't have recall.

SissySpacekAteMyHamster Fri 18-Oct-19 10:40:06

Dogs who can't be controlled shouldn't be off lead. She was very much in the wrong.

I have 2 dogs who I walk on lead but anyone running past us is ignored by them.

ArthurEyeTits Fri 18-Oct-19 10:40:19

Of course you weren't BU.
Wtf says you shouldn't come up behind dogs?
The woman sounds deranged and needs to be on a leash herself.

WatchingFromTheWings Fri 18-Oct-19 10:41:02

I'm a dog owner. I have 3. I'd have held onto all 3 until you were well away as they would all join you in your run! If I had seen/heard you in advance they'd have all been on their leads before you got close. That's no matter what direction you were running.

DontBuyANewMumCashmere Fri 18-Oct-19 10:41:07

Jogging dog owner here.
She's crackers, her dogs have awful recall and she should not let them off if she can't reliably get them back to her!
(mine have shit recall so don't often get let off in places like that!)
She was probably shouting at you because she was embarrassed and flapping.
Yanbu.

Beagled Fri 18-Oct-19 10:41:14

It’s her fault. I always stick mine on a lead when there’s a jogger as he’ll think it’s a game and run with them 🤦🏼‍♀️

AmIThough Fri 18-Oct-19 10:42:12

I'm a dog owner and if your dog is off lead it is your response to ensure they behave appropriately when commanded and around other people.

You were kind enough to stop to stop her dogs running any further. If she can't control them that's her issue.

Beautiful3 Fri 18-Oct-19 10:42:35

Of course she should have put them on their lead, as they were out of control! Yanbu. Next time dont stop, keep running and watch her run!!

Disfordarkchocolate Fri 18-Oct-19 10:42:36

What did she expect, all the people in the park to slowly walk behind her like she was the Queen? She was very unreasonable.

willywillywillywilly Fri 18-Oct-19 10:42:45

She was BVU, however when I'm out running I often come across dogs in situations similar to what you describe - if you call out "hello" or "good morning" or something when you're still a reasonable distance from the owner, it gives them a chance to put dogs on the lead or grab their collars.

She does sound like a total dick though, and should have been able to control her dogs.

Bythebeach Fri 18-Oct-19 10:44:45

Eh? My dog is a bloody idiot, now aged 2. For her first year, she had a propensity for chasing joggers and I would keep her on lead if joggers around and occasionally one from behind might catch me by surprise and I’d have to grab dog and apologise profusely if I wasn’t quick enough. She’s now trained out of it but still gets a bit wiggly and excited if jogger goes past (no chasing) and it was hard work to train and distract her to get her to the point where she didn’t. But it most certainly isn’t YOUR fault-she should have been apologising to you!

bloodywhitecat Fri 18-Oct-19 10:48:25

Should dogs even be off the lead in a nature reserve, most I go to ask for dogs to be kept on leads. She was completely unreasonable, dog owners should have them under close control at all times.

powershowerforanhour Fri 18-Oct-19 10:48:37

Yes it's instinctive for dogs to chase running people and animals but they should have recall well enough trained into them to stop and return on command, no matter how many of them there are. If she hasn't got verbal control of them then they should either be on leads or at least she shoukd have apologised and clipped them on till you were gone.

You should not have to stop your run every time you go past dogs that's just silly. If I was passing a horse I'd probably call a good morning well in advance to let horse and rider know I was there, pass out of kicking range and slow down if the horse looked upset but it is the rider's job to get the horse's head in the road and bum in the hedge if necessary. If I got kicked or barged and knocked over by the horse it is probably the rider's fault unless I went right up behind the horse's hocks.

PenelopeFlintstone Fri 18-Oct-19 10:49:19

A jogger came up very quietly behind my DH who had our young medium-sized dog on a lead, on a narrow footpath. Our dog got a fright and jumped up and nipped her on the elbow.

Sweetpotatoaddict Fri 18-Oct-19 10:49:23

In this instance I find the statement “ aggression is the best form of defence” and carry on.

Her dogs were out of control, end of. I’ve had two instances with dog owners yelling at me when there was no debate that they were in the wrong.

ginghamstarfish Fri 18-Oct-19 10:49:47

She was an entitled twat, as are lots of dog owners.

tealady Fri 18-Oct-19 10:49:51

Dog owner here. She was massively unreasonable. Dogs can be unreliable even if well trained but that should be her problem not yours and she should have been massively apologetic for them behaving in a way that was scary for you.

The law is quite clear and says:
"Your dog is considered dangerously out of control if it:
injures someone
makes someone worried that it might injure them"
Although it is tricky when people appear out of nowhere for dogs off lead - I would expect her to apologise and start getting them on lead immediately.

FairfaxAikman Fri 18-Oct-19 10:50:39

I'm a dog owner and her dogs were not under control if they could not be recalled.
I have a dog that runs and barks when given half a chance. I know he's not dangerous but others don't so he's put on a lead in situations where it's clear he will run (discounting idiots who bring bitches in season to public places at peak times - he's been known to run two miles after catching that scent and there's no way I can predict it if I can't see it!)

AllFourOfThem Fri 18-Oct-19 10:50:52

She was BU and needs to train her dogs better before letting them off the lead.

JMoore Fri 18-Oct-19 10:51:19

That's just stupid. Where I live, there always are people with dogs out, especially on the tracks popular with joggers. If you can't overtake the dog walkers, what are you supposed to do?

And I am a dog owner, who often gets overtaken by joggers. We've never had issues. But my dog is always leashed and under control.

Weatherforducks Fri 18-Oct-19 10:52:52

No, you did nothing wrong, the woman knew you were there (as she stepped to the side), she should have prepared her dogs/reliably recalled them. My dog loves barking, would run off if she caught a scent (her recall is dependent on if I have sausages in my pocket), and she would think it was exciting to run with you...so she’s on a lead for most walks (unless we are in a safe place and she wouldn’t bother anyone). My dog is lovely, but others don’t know that and her barking can be off putting.

Occasionally, cyclists/joggers can surprise my dog if coming from behind, but my dog is my responsibility so I’m aware of what’s going on and most make themselves known anyway.

diddl Fri 18-Oct-19 10:53:12

Ah yes, that well known rule about not jogging behind & then overtaking dogs!

Sparklfairy Fri 18-Oct-19 10:56:49

Dogs have a chase reflex and a pack mentality so this can't be the first time this has happened to her! One decided to chase, they all follow, all bark. She's irresponsible and stupid. My dog became unreliable with recall in old age (deaf or cantankerous I'm not sure) and I never let him off the lead then because it was just too risky.

TheOrigRightsofwomen Fri 18-Oct-19 10:57:02

I'm a runner. In your situation I would make the dog owner aware of my presence and then darn well expect them to accommodate my running.

I would have been MAD to be forced to stop (my run time is precious).

Most dog owners are very respectful and I am sure to thank them for stepping aside. There's just the odd twat.

Zaphodsotherhead Fri 18-Oct-19 10:57:56

I run with my dog, so not many people pass us, but if I see anyone coming in the opposite direction I shorten up her lead as she will lunge. People running are prey to her and instinct kicks in, recall goes out of the window and the KILL signs light up in her eyes.

She's a lovely dog, just not when other people or animals are around.

Your dog walker was out of order but probably scared and embarrassed, which made her lash out.

SunshineAngel Fri 18-Oct-19 10:58:42

If her dogs aren't well trained enough not to go running off after people, they should be on short leads. Chances are she was embarrassed and just trying to shift the blame to you.

LakieLady Fri 18-Oct-19 10:59:08

Yes, her dogs should have been under control, and she was in the wrong.

What does help, especially with young dogs whose training isn't quite 100% reliable yet, is if you call out that you're a runner coming along a bit before you get to them. It gives the owner a chance to get the dogs under control before you get there. It's much easier to prevent a dog from running than to stop it once it's started.

I found a warning call really helpful. I could put the dog into a sit from a little way away, even when they were little. They wouldn't run once their bums were on the ground.

That didn't work the day we met a jogger with a dog though. His dog was fat and a good way behind him so he was constantly calling "Rover*, Rover", which happened to be my dog's name too. So she ran after him, thinking he was calling her.

He gave me a mouthful of very sweary abuse about keeping my dog under control, and told me to fuck off and get a life when I explained that she was under control, but it was his control!

On another occasion, I called my dog back, not realising that there were another 3 runners following, who overtook after I'd called her. One of them tripped over her as she ran back. On that occasion, it was apparently all my fault that I didn't have eyes in the back of my head and that my dog came promptly when she was called.

*Neither dog was actually called Rover

FreshwaterBay Fri 18-Oct-19 10:59:10

I would have kept on running. Let here get her dogs.

LaLoba Fri 18-Oct-19 10:59:15

She was a dick, and if it’s any comfort that type of person spoils walks for dog owners too, because no matter how badly their dog has behaved, they never take responsibility.
I run with my dogs, so I’m very aware of the inconvenience and fear they could cause other people. My dogs are my responsibility, not anyone else’s. Her dogs shouldn’t be off the lead at all from the sounds of it.
I call out to people with dogs when running, but that’s just because I am soft in the head where dogs are concerned and don’t want to startle the little darlings! It’s in no way your responsibility. It’s entirely hers, and she can get in trouble with the law just for allowing her dogs to cause fear of attack.

megletthesecond Fri 18-Oct-19 11:00:08

Yanbu.
I'm a runner who loves dogs but if the owner has seen me then I jog on round.

LimitIsUp Fri 18-Oct-19 11:00:11

"She was an entitled twat, as are lots of dog owners."

Right back at you ginghamstarfish i.e. opinionated, generalising twat

cmac76, - the dog owner was completely in the wrong. I am a dog owner and would be mortified if my dogs chased a runner - as it happens they wouldn't because we have worked together tirelessly on recall and its a pleasure to walk them.

My dd and I have been chased before whilst running and its pretty frightening

RainbowBlanket Fri 18-Oct-19 11:01:35

YANBU, but if I were you I’d call out just before I got to her so she could put the dogs on a lead

AbuelitaAyahuasca Fri 18-Oct-19 11:01:46

I’d never run past a loose dog I didn’t know, and doubly extra cautious with groups of loose dogs. The dog walker you encountered was massively unreasonable, poor recall somewhere so public is indefensible.

Pukkatea Fri 18-Oct-19 11:02:15

Totally different to a horse. Horses could be spooked and become dangerous for their rider and passers by, and there is no absolute way to train that out of them. A dog that isn't trained not to chase after people isn't anyone's responsibility but the owners.

LaLoba Fri 18-Oct-19 11:02:43

On another occasion, I called my dog back, not realising that there were another 3 runners following, who overtook after I'd called her. One of them tripped over her as she ran back. On that occasion, it was apparently all my fault that I didn't have eyes in the back of my head and that my dog came promptly when she was called.

It was your fault. Your dog was too far away/out of sight and you failed to control her. If the person she tripped had been hurt, the local constabulary would have held you responsible.

LoveNote Fri 18-Oct-19 11:03:02

I’ve many a time found myself with a joyous little running buddy!

Sometimes I stop so the owner can catch up, sometimes I don’t....mostly, dogs like to run alongside

Spudlet Fri 18-Oct-19 11:04:13

She’s wrong. It is helpful to let people know when you’re coming up behind them and in the case of horses it’s sensible to ask if you can overtake - but it’s not ok for her to blame you for her dogs chasing you! I’m a dog owner and used to be a trainer pre-DC, and I always say morning (or whatever) before coming past because that’s polite and nice in the woods, and I don’t want to make people jump, but I certainly don’t expect to have to stop every time.

potter5 Fri 18-Oct-19 11:04:14

I have 2 dogs and they are always on the lead. Doesn't matter where we are. My eldest boxer was attacked by a Jack Russell who wasn't on a lead and was hanging off my dog's neck! TBF the owner did apologise profusely.

The lady with the dogs surely realises that people jog in that area. She is a complete fruitcake to behave like that.

ChilledBee Fri 18-Oct-19 11:04:31

I wouldn't but not because it is wrong or because I shouldn't be able to but because it will be me who is bitten if it spooks them.

Seasprayandsunshine Fri 18-Oct-19 11:05:25

Yadnbu - she sounds mental. If anyone thought she owned the park it was her.

My little dogs like to run with joggers, hence they stay on the lead!
I really can't understand the obsession with dogs being off the lead everywhere. There are free run appropriate spaces - this does not sound like one of them.

ChilledBee Fri 18-Oct-19 11:07:13

Horses could be spooked and become dangerous for their rider and passers by, and there is no absolute way to train that out of them. A dog that isn't trained not to chase after people isn't anyone's responsibility but the owners.

That kind if goes for dogs too. Maybe we expect them to lose too many of their instincts. Maybe horses shouldn't be out where they could cause danger if they were spooked by regular activity such as jogging. I don't get why we absolutely should not do that to a horse because we can't expect it to be trained not to respond that way but do expect that from a dog. I wouldn't have thought there was a great deal of difference in intelligence between the 2 species.

TwittleBee Fri 18-Oct-19 11:07:26

oh OP I feel for you - this has happened to me 3/4 of the times I jogged at our local country park so I no longer jog there and instead jog around the streets instead.

Lunafortheloveogod Fri 18-Oct-19 11:07:30

Some dogs do chase, but they should be on a lead. What if it was a child playing running past them? A large dog could easily bowl them over without being aggressive but that’s still enough to hurt/frighten them.

Had dogs since I was in nappies.. have a chaser at the mo he’s on the lead and had an overly friendly chasing bull mastiff (my ex’s) her recall was usually amazing.. except the one jogger who wore bright yellow Lycra everything, he used to run up behind me and shout laughing (we discovered he was the postman so she knew him well As he fed them small treats to try n break the evil postie cycle) he really just didn’t want a wet arse from slobber chops. Any time I heard him I grabbed her onto her lead and she’d wait fine.. lead meant no running.

Those dogs weren’t trained well enough at all or should’ve been on a lead. Bolting could so easily be after a car next time.

Huntlybyelection Fri 18-Oct-19 11:08:23

YANBU

I stop running and walk past dogs now because a lot of dog owners near here think it's adorable when their dogs jump up at me when I'm running past. Because they won't put the dogs on the lead, I've changed my actions so that I don't get jumped on/nipped by puppies/muddied.

Junkmail Fri 18-Oct-19 11:08:26

She’s mental and she hasn’t trained her dogs properly which she’s probably embarrassed about and lashed out at you as a result. I have four dogs and as I know that I will encounter joggers and cyclists on a daily basis while out walking they are trained to behave and wait at the edge of the path when I ask them so people can pass. It’s not that difficult to do but for some reason some dog owners can’t be bothered even putting in that little bit of effort and instead expect the rest of the world to tiptoe around their badly behaved dogs. Carry on jogging OP—it’s a shared, public space and she has no right to dictate to you what you can and can’t do.

Lipz Fri 18-Oct-19 11:11:20

What did she expect you to do ? Run behind her ? Would she expect all joggers to run behind her ? She moved aside, I'd take this as her letting you past. I would have asked her what she'd like you to do seen as she'd no control, maybe an airhorn in future, that'd give her plenty of notice.

WildfirePonie Fri 18-Oct-19 11:14:26

YANBU - her dogs were out of control.

www.gov.uk/control-dog-public

I am so sick and tired of dogs running up to me and my kids and jumping on them/me and the owner saying "oh it's fine they are just saying hello".
No, I don't want your f**king dog jumping all over me/my kids or in my space.

Next time just kick the dog/s out of your way, you'll be helping the dogs in the long run. Teach them it's not their business to run up to whoever they want.

Derbee Fri 18-Oct-19 11:17:26

She’s an arsehole. Even if her dogs wouldn’t have chased you, she should have kept them close or on a lead when she knew you were running past. Dog owners shouldn’t make runners have to worry about whether it’s safe to go past or not.

If you’re walking a dog, and there’s a runner approaching, you should take charge of the situation and keep your dogs close so that the runner doesn’t need to worry.

I’m a runner, and a dog owner. But i don’t like running past dogs as you never know how they’ll behave. Onus is on the dog owner to keep the situation safe/comfortable, so YANBU

cmac76 Fri 18-Oct-19 11:17:27

Thanks for all the responses - relieved to read that I wasn't being unreasonable! I think I will call out in future when I see dogs up ahead though as it's not the first time I have had dogs approach me on my run - others have jumped up at me which I really hate.

Also dreading the moment when I bump into this lady again as is bound to happen 🙄

WildfirePonie Fri 18-Oct-19 11:21:31

Tell the owner to recall their dog right now and if they don't comply/can't recall after a few seconds then it's safe to assume the dog is out of control and you can kick it out your way.

Seasprayandsunshine Fri 18-Oct-19 11:23:12

Please do not kick the dogs 🙄

What a ridiculous suggestion, for so many reasons Wildfireponie

DogAndCatPerson Fri 18-Oct-19 11:24:59

I’ve got a dog. She’s batshit

missbattenburg Fri 18-Oct-19 11:27:00

She was an entitled twat, as are lots of dog owners people

Of course some horses can be trained out of being spooked. Otherwise they'd be pretty shit for crowd control. Whilst every owner of every animal should do their best to train them so they can cope in the world in which they live with minimum impact on others, it's often only dogs that perfection is expected from.

Notwithstanding that, pets are rarely trained to the same standard as working animals (dogs or horses) and this is generally to be expected. Whilst I would always leash up Battendog if a runner was anywhere near by, then step off the path out of their way as they pass, I also really appreciate a head's up from them before they get to us. It means I have a few seconds to get him back with me and clipped up and a treat out my pocket so I can reinforce that focussing on my in the presence of runners is a Great Thing To Do. Generally I have found that if all that happens then the runner and I get to share a very pleasant "morning!" as they pass without any angst or problem.

(Unlike the tits who were moutain biking in a nearby woods the other day and flew past us as a herd of about 10 of them at fast speeds.)

p.s. Next time just kick the dog/s out of your way, you'll be helping the dogs in the long run. Teach them it's not their business to run up to whoever they want. That's not what the dogs will learn from that example. They will learn that runners are dangerous and so likely require aggression to keep them away.

DogAndCatPerson Fri 18-Oct-19 11:27:29

Do not kick the dog. Not only is it cruel but you are just going to make the problem worse and turn a dog with a high chase drive into a dog with fear aggression who is likely to attack people.

DogAndCatPerson Fri 18-Oct-19 11:28:09

Agreed missbattenburg

sparepantsandtoothbrush Fri 18-Oct-19 11:29:15

Anybody who has their dog off lead when they don't have instant recall is quite frankly a dick. My dog is a shit and doesn't listen most of the time so he's always on his lead for this is reason

Scarydinosaurs Fri 18-Oct-19 11:30:51

What on earth did she want you to do?? I don’t get it. You had to run past her!

IfIHadAPenny Fri 18-Oct-19 11:31:21

A jogger came up very quietly behind my DH who had our young medium-sized dog on a lead, on a narrow footpath. Our dog got a fright and jumped up and nipped her on the elbow.

@PenelopeFlintstone Do you think that was your fault for not being aware of your surroundings and failing to control your dog or the jogger's fault for not announcing herself?

I hope you muzzle your dog now in case it has a 'fright' again.

AmIThough Fri 18-Oct-19 11:32:54

@WildfirePonie try kicking my dog and see where it gets you.

FWIW being aggressive towards and animal will make the animal aggressive.

LaLoba Fri 18-Oct-19 11:33:52

OP, maybe make a point of taking a picture of her dogs off lead?

I had a nightmare recently with an idiot man locally, who didn’t even carry a lead for his poorly trained dog. He repeatedly allowed it to charge up and aggravate my on lead terrier - we’re still working on walking past other dogs without her having a meltdown as a direct result of his actions. And I needed a stick to walk due to balance issues at the time, so trying to block his dog to prevent it being mauled by my small savage was a serious falling risk to me. He just stood there grinning like a fool each time.

My husband took to putting on a performance of taking a picture of him and his off lead dog every time he saw him. Now idiot man uses a lead. I am a non violent middle aged woman, but the sight of that stupid smirk makes me want to punch him!

redchocolatebutton Fri 18-Oct-19 11:34:14

yanbu

her dogs were out of control and should have been/stayed on the lead.

LinoleumBlownapart Fri 18-Oct-19 11:34:46

Her dogs needed to be on leads. People who throw horse analogies about when they are talking about completely different animals are usually in the wrong.

adaline Fri 18-Oct-19 11:34:47

Next time just kick the dog/s out of your way, you'll be helping the dogs in the long run. Teach them it's not their business to run up to whoever they want.

That's not what you'll teach the dog at all hmm

All the dog will learn is that strangers/runners are dangerous and will hurt them. Then the dog could try and use aggression to keep people/runners away from them in the future because they're scared of being kicked again.

Please don't go around kicking strange animals. You have no idea what their temperament is like and whether they'll just cower away, run or retaliate with biting.

Spudlet Fri 18-Oct-19 11:35:35

Kicking the dog would be really, really stupid. Don’t kick the dog. (I can’t believe that needs to be said, but some people are stupid, so...)

ChrisPrattsFace Fri 18-Oct-19 11:35:39

I would have kept running.. not your fault her dogs aren’t under control or have any recall.

(And I have many dogs, and would acknowledge it would be own fault if it happened to me)

LakieLady Fri 18-Oct-19 11:36:29

It was your fault. Your dog was too far away/out of sight and you failed to control her. If the person she tripped had been hurt, the local constabulary would have held you responsible.

She was probably within about 5 metres of me and was perfectly under control, as evidenced by the fact that she turned back and came to me the minute I called her. I couldn't have reasonably foreseen that a runner, who I didn't know was behind me, was about to overtake and run towards my running dog.

yabadabadontdoit Fri 18-Oct-19 11:37:04

I have spaniels who are walked off lead. They don’t chase but can be a trip hazard to runners as they may run across the runner ( because they are small brained and fast moving!) For this reason I always call them and make them sit whilst runners pass. If I haven’t seen a runner from behind I always warn them a spaniel might run across them, if I call them at this point they’re more likely to run across the runner. The only time it could potentially be a problem is when the runner has headphones in and doesn’t hear me, but then I think that’s their choice to run in a public place and cut out their hearing.

trendingsomewhere Fri 18-Oct-19 11:37:12

I am a runner - with a dog - and I run with / walk my dog off lead.
Ddog is not perfect, but she would never chase or intimidate anyone, otherwise she would be muzzled / on lead (she's quite small and fluffy so not a chance anyone would be scared apart from some small children) but I have owned larger dog before and I treat ddog the same as I would have treated them.

100% this women's dogs have done this before and she shouted at you because as has been said, some people believe attack is the best form of defence.

I would just forget it, you were in the right.
It's quite unusual for dog owners to be this bad and especially to have 3 dogs, so hopefully you won't encounter her again.

adaline Fri 18-Oct-19 11:38:06

It was your fault. Your dog was too far away/out of sight and you failed to control her. If the person she tripped had been hurt, the local constabulary would have held you responsible.

No. It's the runners fault for not watching where she was going and tripping over the dog! Not everything is the fault of the dog - humans can be to blame too hmm

Zeldasmagicwand Fri 18-Oct-19 11:39:08

The dogs should be on a lead in a place frequented by the public, full stop.
It's irrelevant whether they have good recall.
Children are likely to run up to them and you need to be able to control the dog and grab it easily, if necessary.

If I got surrounded by free ranging barking dogs when minding my own business a few swift kicks would have been metered out.

OrchidInTheRain Fri 18-Oct-19 11:39:57

It's not generally a good idea to run up behind a dog on a lead as the previous poster said. But off lead? No, her dogs should be under control.

She knew you were coming and so should have put the dogs on leads if she thought they were going to react.

adaline Fri 18-Oct-19 11:41:58

If I got surrounded by free ranging barking dogs when minding my own business a few swift kicks would have been metered out.

And what do you think that would achieve, exactly? hmm

All you would do is hurt them, teach them that strangers are something to fear, and make them more prone to aggressive behaviours in the future.

If a dog is running around you, the best thing is to stand still, fold your arms and avoid eye contact.

Emptyspacex Fri 18-Oct-19 11:42:00

3 dogs off the lead is a lot for one women to handle. They should of been on the lead or taken out seperately.
I sometimes struggle with one dog off or on the lead.
Try not to let it get to you. Continue your jogs as you were. Hopefully dog owner will learn from this.

Toucan123 Fri 18-Oct-19 11:42:27

You should "never run behind a pack of dogs"? So if I'm out for a run and I see dogs in front of me I have to stop running? What a load of bollocks. She is batshit.

SugarPlumLairy2 Fri 18-Oct-19 11:42:51

YANBU

Dog owners like that really piss me off😡
I have a large dog. She is nervous and doesn’t like people approaching her or moving suddenly etc. Guess what.. it’s MY “problem” not everyone else’s. We adjust OUR behaviour so she can walk safely which means I’m alert, she’s on lead, we avoid popular jogging paths etc.

Her dogs were not controlled and, worse, would have picked up on her anger/aggression. That could’ve turned nasty.

Take care, I’m so sorry that some dog owners spoil it for the rest of us.

PenelopeFlintstone Fri 18-Oct-19 11:43:46

@PenelopeFlintstone Do you think that was your fault for not being aware of your surroundings and failing to control your dog or the jogger's fault for not announcing herself? I hope you muzzle your dog now in case it has a 'fright' again.

Well, it wasn't my fault because I wasn't there but I would say that it would be hard to completely aware of what is behind you if it doesn't make any noise at all.
My DH also got a big shock as the dog had never done anything like that. I think the jogger could've given them a wider berth or made a noise. My DH was very apologetic. The jogger said she shouldn't have been so close. The dog is a popular breed but known for being a bit bitey sometimes. The dog only gave a warning nip, thank goodness and didn't do any damage.
We moved to a rural area quite soon after but that dog was always muzzled at the vets for uncomfortable ear inspections, just in case.

LakieLady Fri 18-Oct-19 11:44:28

they are trained to behave and wait at the edge of the path when I ask them so people can pass.

Mine too. They sit patiently, in the knowledge that a biscuit is coming their way.

They even did it when we encountered the hunt one Boxing Day: sat beautifully at the side of the birdleway while the hounds and what felt like about 100 horses trotted past. The master or one of the officials (I think - bringing up the rear, red coat, very well turned out - but I'm not up on that sort of thing) made a point of complimenting me for their excellent behaviour.

LaLoba Fri 18-Oct-19 11:44:56

She was probably within about 5 metres of me and was perfectly under control, as evidenced by the fact that she turned back and came to me the minute I called her. I couldn't have reasonably foreseen that a runner, who I didn't know was behind me, was about to overtake and run towards my running dog.

Your dog is considered out of control in uk law if she injures someone. Mistakes happen, we all make them, but you need to be aware of your responsibilities for your dog’s sake.

yabadabadontdoit Fri 18-Oct-19 11:47:01

Children should be on a lead in a place frequented by the public, full stop.
It's irrelevant whether they have good recall.
Dogs are likely to run up to them and you need to be able to control the child and grab it easily, if necessary.

If I got surrounded by free ranging screeching children when minding my own business a few swift kicks would have been metered out

Nope, it doesn’t work that way round either Zelda How about
The dogs should be under control in a place frequented by the public, full stop.
They should have good recall.
Children should never run up to them, and you need to be able to control both children and dogs and grab them easily, if necessary.

If I got surrounded by free ranging screeching children or barking dogs whilst minding my own business I would remain calm and wait for the parent/ owner to control them. I would NEVER kick an animal or child.

PenelopeFlintstone Fri 18-Oct-19 11:47:38

IfIHadAPenny - and, as I said, the dog was on a lead but the jogger came very, very close. It happened in a flash.

ShinyGiratina Fri 18-Oct-19 11:47:46

As a runner, I slow down and keep as wide of dogs as I can. I don't know which dogs are poorly controlled, which ones are trip hazards and which have stupid owners (although there are a few locals I recognise through experience...) It is the owner's responsibility to control their dogs and this one has failed in her duties which is an offence. I can do what I can to modify my actions and reasonably not provoke a dog, but ultimately the owner knows the dog and has a legal responsibility to it.

If your dog is not very sociable and reliably trained, you can use a lead, go to quieter places and go at quieter times.

Most issues I've had with dogs have been when walking slowly (with or without children) rather than running.

Enwi Fri 18-Oct-19 11:47:56

It sounds like she didn’t have her dogs under control, which in itself is unacceptable regardless of what you did.
However, I do think YABU to run up behind 3 dogs and not make yourself known. Even a ‘good morning’ would have given the lady less of a fright and given her a chance to put her dogs on a lead.
My dog has great recall, and has never displayed any signs of aggression, but actually if someone ran past me and spooked me I wouldn’t be wholly surprised if he barked at them. Dogs are very attentive to their owners feelings, and if the owner felt scared then that’s signifying for her dogs to feel the same way.
I’ve had a cyclist go past me before without declaring himself and that half scared me to death too.

cmac76 Fri 18-Oct-19 11:52:17

enwi - she knew I was coming as she moved to one side to let me past so I don't think I 'spooked' her.

Maryfloppins Fri 18-Oct-19 11:53:45

Runner and dog owner here .
She was being unreasonable . A dog owner should control their dogs at all times , if they cannot then they should be on a lead . If my dog had bitten a runner whilst out they would now be muzzled . It is not the job of the general public to bow down to my dog , he is a dog .

beachandcocktails Fri 18-Oct-19 11:56:05

I'm a runner and a dog owner. YANBU. If I'm out running and I see a dog, I do just be a bit cautious as I know some dogs do get a bit spooked/overexcited by someone running. But the responsibility is on the dog owner to have control of their dog. They should have been on a lead, they were out of control because they weren't on one - that's her fault, not yours.

jollygoose Fri 18-Oct-19 11:56:17

Agree with other posters she was totally unreasonable. I`ve told this before but last year I was walking in a park with dh when an excited dog on an extended lead got under my feet and tripped me up. I was just righting myself and expecting an apology from the walker when she rounded on me and demanded aren`t you going to apologise to the dog? Totally batshit and I`m a dog lover.

bingoitsadingo Fri 18-Oct-19 11:57:29

I think as long as you leave a bit of space, it's fine. Every owner has a responsibility to control their animals, dog or horse. So you should give them a suitable amount of space, enough that they can't kick/bite/jump at you, but it's the dog owners responsibility to stop their dog chasing after you. And if a horse gets scared by you running near it, that's the riders responsibility to deal with.

NameChange789435 Fri 18-Oct-19 12:01:18

I'm a runner and I run in the local Common with my dog and have worked really really hard on his recall so that we can run together. I come across most of the issues talked about every week!

The "recall? what recall?" (just runs about completely oblivious to owner who shouts and blows whistle to no effect)
The "last minute lunger" (looks perfectly fine until you're about 1 metre away and then suddenly lunges at either me or my dog)
The "Savannah stalker" (lies down like a lion in the middle of the path and stares at us completely motionless, scares the shit out of us as we try to decide if it's friendly or not! Often then becomes a "lunger"!)
The "don't mind me" (sudden change of direction and bolts right in front of your feet)
And my personal favourite the "no it's friendly!" (as it pins my dog to the floor and then jumps all over me looking for treats in my pockets) grin

I like dogs and most dog owners are nice. Mostly they apologise if their dogs do something unpleasant and I usually smile back and we part ways cheerfully enough. I enjoy interacting with other people on our runs and my dog loves meeting new dogs. A bit of courtesy on both sides counts for a lot.

You'll always get the odd arsehole unfortunately. The woman was unreasonable and hostile, I probably would have shouted back too. Try not to let it bother you, you won't be the first or the last run in she has!

WhenOneDoorClosesAnotherOpens Fri 18-Oct-19 12:01:31

I regularly walk my large dog in one of these type places, but he is always on a lead. You and a classroom full of children could have happily jogged past us and he would not have chased anyone or paid much attention at all tbh.

Her dogs sound out of control and they most likely should not have been off lead. In saying that, I've come across a few people who have multiple dogs off lead and they tend to think it's ok for their dogs to behave inappropriately and no one else should mind. It's to the point I avoid certain areas locally where I know this is a problem (spots frequented by unhindged people with multiple 'problem' dogs kept off lead).

NewNameGuy Fri 18-Oct-19 12:02:44

YANBU. I think she kicked off because she didn't have any control of her dogs and was embarrassed

WomensRightsAreContraversial Fri 18-Oct-19 12:02:58

Oh good, the mumsnet posters who don't understand and categorically don't want to learn basic animal behaviour are out in force again, advising dangerous things to do around animals. Fkn brilliant.

OP I'm really sorry you had that experience. She was an utter dick.

Taking a wider detour around them and calling out in advance is your best strategy in general. I'm sorry to say that it sounds like her and her dogs will be difficult whatever you do.

Kicking a dog is likely to get you bitten, FYI <glares at the idiots who suggested that>

If a runner came up close behind me and my dog, my dog would likely be scared of the sudden and fast appearance of a human and run from you. That's not a problem for me because she'd be on a lead, but as I'm trying to build her confidence I'd really appreciate it if you gave us some space and called up ahead so I (and she) were alerted to your presence and I could take the opportunity to train her that you're nothing to worry about. I'm partially deaf, for the ignorant poster who thinks I should be aware of somebody coming into mine and my dog's space. My attention is on my dog and my surroundings including behind, but it would be very easy for a runner to appear in the time that my focus is on my dog, training her something specific. I have a better chance of hearing a clear friendly call ahead than I do footsteps. Again, if the runner passes us wide that's helpful too.

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