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To think that schools and NHS are not accountable for knife crime?

(37 Posts)
malificent7 Mon 01-Apr-19 18:25:54

Of course if kids are weilding kives into school then schools need to report it...not sure how the nhs are responsible except for treating stab wounds.

Aibu to think the government is accountable and austerity? What about policing our streets properly? 20, 000 police laid off? No coincidence knife crime is on the up.

Teatimeted Mon 01-Apr-19 18:30:26

I agree. It just feels like another stick to bash an already overworked segment of the public sector with.

BecauseYouAreWorthIt Mon 01-Apr-19 18:33:07

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Tomtontom Mon 01-Apr-19 18:35:34

Giving them a statutory responsibility is a slippery slope. What happens if they miss someone who goes on to commit a crime? Another scapegoat for the government to blame.

malificent7 Mon 01-Apr-19 18:35:40

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malificent7 Mon 01-Apr-19 18:36:16

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aintnothinbutagstring Mon 01-Apr-19 18:41:45

Serious youth crime is everybody's problem, not just an issue for police. Teens spend most of their day in school, interpersonal conflicts arise in school. Lots of kids are groomed into gangs through contacts at school. Schools should improve pastoral care, educate children on conflict resolution, gang involvement, county lines. Same goes for the NHS, deal properly with teen mental health, teen drug and alcohol addiction, it might contribute to reducing youth crime.

StoneofDestiny Mon 01-Apr-19 18:44:16

A lot of knife hooligans don't go to school.
Unless they are welding scalpels, what has it do do with the NHS?

mbosnz Mon 01-Apr-19 18:46:38

Maybe schools and NHS could improve services if they had the FUNDING to improve services? Ditto the police? Instead of constantly being required to do more with even less?

SimonJT Mon 01-Apr-19 18:47:20

Knife crime (like most violent crime) is a societal issue, until society changes as a whole crime rates will not significantly fall.

Teachers, nurses etc can educate young people as much as they like, but they cannot change that young persons home life. If we look at knife crime most offenders are young, urban, living in poverty, a family with little aspirations/work ethic, little parental involvement in behaviour expectations etc. Until we can change those things in a childs life we cannot change their future.

wigglybeezer Mon 01-Apr-19 18:49:50

They haven't explained it well but they are referring to the joined up thinking approach taken in Glasgow that massively cut knife crime. Hospitals informed an agency whenever a stabbing victim came in ( most victims were gang members) and an intervention would then take place to get the stable straight into an anti violence programme with training and employment support. Schools also implemented anti violence education starting at about 8/9. The funds came from public health money.

slashlover Mon 01-Apr-19 18:55:00

Watching the Scottish news and it said that Scotland changed it's way of dealing with it about 10 years ago and it lead to a reduction. The police gathered the suspects and had paramedics/A&E doctors speak to them as well as victims and people who previously had been involved in knife crime.

It was basically, "we know you do it so either you go to jail or you engage with us and let us help you". So NHS, schools, police etc. have to work together and not just leave it to one department.

EmeraldShamrock Mon 01-Apr-19 19:03:21

I think we all need to be accountable for knife crime, Parents firstly but all those in authority need to pull together too, starting with education, showing the DC the repercussions of knife crime, how it tears family after family apart.
Every other day I read of another teenager's life destroyed.
I think society is going backward. I fear my DC becoming teens in this world.

user1493413286 Mon 01-Apr-19 19:05:31

It’s just a way of distracting from the government actually doing anything. I have no doubt that they already report it but then what happens? Reporting it doesn’t solve it.

EmeraldShamrock Mon 01-Apr-19 19:06:17

but they cannot change that young persons home life
I agree some start young, but some start carrying in fear of meeting a gang.

jellycatspyjamas Mon 01-Apr-19 19:10:32

The Scottish approach didn’t include statutory reporting of young people who might maybe possibly become involved in knife crime - that’s an impossible assessment to make and teachers, health staff aren’t trained and equipped for that along with the million other things they’re meant to spot.

The Scottish system worked with victims and alleged/convicted offenders, not people who the government deemed to look a bit dodgy.

malificent7 Mon 01-Apr-19 19:10:52

I would guess that most knife related incidents are reported although schools can be reticent to admit any problems.

tinkywinky777 Mon 01-Apr-19 19:14:47

No, schools should not be accountable for knife crime. As a teacher I shouldn’t also be dealing with treating HSB (harmful sexual behaviour), mental health crisises, family financial issues and counselling of parents but unfortunately I am.

And that’s without the responsibility of teaching kids to use a knife and fork, dress themselves, provide breakfast when they arrive partway through the morning and find them a warm coat from lost property. But unfortunately I do that as well.

It’s possibly why it’s sometimes hard to fit in the teaching of lessons.

CognitiveDissonance Mon 01-Apr-19 19:18:33

I just want to know at what point we start applying some of these accountability measures to parents. If I'm to be held to account for a young person in various capacities, then so the hell should they.

CognitiveDissonance Mon 01-Apr-19 19:20:58

Maybe schools and NHS could improve services if they had the FUNDING to improve services? Ditto the police? Instead of constantly being required to do more with even less?

THIS

BecauseYouAreWorthIt Mon 01-Apr-19 19:24:48

My guess is that the personality disordered fathers are long gone. The personality disordered professionals and personality disordered politicians will leave it for decent people to deal with as usual.

I guess we requested personality disordered people to ward off invaders allowing the rest of a societal group to survive, hence the evolutionary brain development lacking in empathy etc.

IceRebel Mon 01-Apr-19 19:29:36

Maybe schools and NHS could improve services if they had the FUNDING to improve services? Ditto the police? Instead of constantly being required to do more with even less?

I agree 100% with this.

and this

Giving them a statutory responsibility is a slippery slope. What happens if they miss someone who goes on to commit a crime? Another scapegoat for the government to blame.

It's not a solution, it's a sticking plaster at best, and will end up shifting the blame onto others.

BecauseYouAreWorthIt Mon 01-Apr-19 19:32:04

Why does the money always go to middle-class non victim virtue signifiers to build their pension pots and career rather that directly to the working-class victims and those in actual need? Narcissistic much?

Intohellbutstayingstrong Mon 01-Apr-19 19:36:03

Yes....lets hold schools and NHS accountable but yet again not a fucking word about feckless parents

BaconMushroomAndScrambledEggs Mon 01-Apr-19 19:36:22

Yanbu, I agree with you op.

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