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To be a bit fuming at Escape To The Country

(247 Posts)
jamoncrumpets Thu 28-Mar-19 16:05:38

Yes, yes, I know I am watching tv in the day and should be out working or volunteering or something, but both kids are ill so we're all having a down day today.

Anyway, I'm fuming because the couple (male, female) are viewing houses and every single time they walk into a kitchen the presenter says 'Well, will this do for you Sharon?' and then when they get to the outside space, garage etc, he turns to the man and says 'What do you think then, Nigel?'

The woman has already said that she isn't much of a cook. He's not letting her off the hook, he is absolutely DESPERATE to sell her a big old kitchen so she fit more neatly into her gender role.

I've never seen this show before, is it always like this? AIBU to want to take the presenter to a female boxing club and have him pummelled for a few bouts?

dontcallmelen Mon 01-Apr-19 15:54:40

Also the windows are always from Germany & cue the hand wringing that they may not fit, coz Tarquin measurements may not be spot on.

Cushellekoala Mon 01-Apr-19 16:05:05

Wallsbangers

Grand Designs is just brilliant. There must be a drinking game for it.
- Kevin has to wear a high visibility and hard hat despite no building work taking place
- Tarquin and Jemima have run out of money so are doing the roof themselves. They are investment bankers
- Jemima is pregnant with twins. They currently live in a caravan with their three older children
- architect quits
- builder takes over the architects job and will project manage the rest of the build
- it snows, for weeks
- the snow has melted and ruined the ground so they cant get the lorry with their imported windows to the house. A crew of German workmen are angry.

😂😂😂
Bonus points if kev uses the word floating, cantilevered or juxtaposition when describing anything to do with the house.

Motoko Mon 01-Apr-19 17:00:21

Can they get the house watertight before the winter storms?

iklboo Mon 01-Apr-19 17:02:12

Grand Designs

- finished result always looks like a primary school or so out of place it looks like it's been dropped in my aliens on serious drugs.

JuniorAsparagus Mon 01-Apr-19 17:22:33

Did anyone watch today's ETTC? Having fallen in love with property one Alistair said at the end 'now they have to sell their house in Woking' so basically they weren't in a position to buy anyway.
Or is it just like a free tour of your chosen area whether you intend to move or not?
If so, my family originated from Gairloch and I'd rather like a trip up there, even though I have no intention of moving. confused

AlexaAmbidextra Mon 01-Apr-19 17:27:49

Bonus points if kev uses the word floating, cantilevered or juxtaposition when describing anything to do with the house.

Or honesty. 🙄

thetemptationofchocolate Tue 02-Apr-19 11:21:35

I have only ever seen one house I really liked, on Grand Designs. This one:
www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/may/12/grand-designs-eco-home-for-sale-in-pictures

longearedbat Tue 02-Apr-19 13:51:05

I have noticed that the proffered properties are not always in the house hunters chosen area by quite a long way, which seems strange.
They (ETTC) have been in our village a couple of times. To the posters who wonder why retired people move to the countryside. Our village, like thousands of others, has a good mix of young and old. A lot of the older people (over 70) were born here and have lived here all their life, in fact their families have been local for, sometimes, centuries. According to all the extremely ageist ideas on here, no one over sixty should be living rurally as they won't have easy access to shops, healthcare, public transport etc. They should all shuffle off to the nearest town or over 60's complex where they will be much 'happier'. Elderly people have lived rurally for years, and will continue to do so. Just because rural living doesn't conform to some, dare I say it, townies ideal of a Starbucks on every corner and buses every 5 minutes, doesn't mean it's wrong or difficult. In fact, our local surgery (yes, we have one in the village, which also dispenses as there is no chemist nearby), if you phone for an appointment will usually see you on the same day, or even within a few hours. I certainly didn't have that luxury when I lived in a market town not far away.
And as for couples over 60 not needing large houses (someone suggested 2 beds was sufficient). Well, that would be one for me and one for my oh, so where would any guests sleep?! We love having lots of space, what's it got to do with anyone else how many spare bedrooms we choose to have? This thread may be lighthearted, but along with the ageism I also detect quite a few green eyed monsters.

CaptainMyCaptain Tue 02-Apr-19 14:42:03

A lot of the older people (over 70) were born here and have lived here all their life, in fact their families have been local for, sometimes, centuries.
In which case they probably have family members around to help them as they get older. I am 64 and don't consider myself old yet but I know what is to come as I had to help my own parents into their 80s (Mum) and 90s (Dad). The village you describe sounds ideal but I wonder how the people planning to live far from the dreaded roads and neighbouring houses will cope.

According to all the extremely ageist ideas on here, no one over sixty should be living rurally as they won't have easy access to shops, healthcare, public transport etc.
I'd just like to be able to walk to the village shop for a bottle of milk from time to time or be able to get help if I fall (happened to my Dad twice - luckily I was less than half an hour away). I would like to be able to use public transport too if I became unable to drive. It happens.

I don't think the people on the thread are being ageist, in fact I think they may be those that are a little older, like myself, and are sensibly thinking of the future.

Ginnymweasley Tue 02-Apr-19 15:21:01

Someone I know was on grand designs. Funniest thing I've ever seen. Lovely house. But it was all ridiculous. They never mentioned his job which I found odd cause they were building the house on his parents farm land but they never once mentioned livestock etc. Hes a lovely guy but was completely out of his depth with the filming and it was all driven by his wife. They kept asking his opinion on things and he just lokkes like a fish out of water. Still to his friends its entertaining viewing.

Hazlenutpie Tue 02-Apr-19 15:33:29

If so, my family originated from Gairloch and I'd rather like a trip up there, even though I have no intention of moving

Give it a go:

www.bbc.co.uk/showsandtours/takepart/escape

Insecure123 Tue 02-Apr-19 15:40:19

I get more annoyed at their £650k budgets next to my £120k......... *not at all envious* envy

RedForShort Tue 02-Apr-19 15:50:51

According to all the extremely ageist ideas on here, no one over sixty should be living rurally as they won't have easy access to shops, healthcare, public transport etc.

Hardly 'extremely ageist' to think that a couple in their mid-60s when making a huge financial investment such as buying an expensive house in the country should consider that in ten years or so they will more than likely not be in the same position.

They might not be as as health or mobile as they are now. They might not be able to drive for one reason or other. Or even one of them might be alone. Considering the location of basic requirements like assistance or help, shops and company should be something to consider long term.

Anyone, no matter what age, buying a house needs to think it'll suit them long term. No point kidding yourself that when you are in your 70s it's more liking your health might deteriorate and effect you lifestyle and needs.

On a personal note this exacly thing is a huge worry for me with my parents. They had the same attitude as you in their 60s. Now my dad's had a stroke (not a major one thankfully) and my mum's cognitive ability is declining. They are too far away for me, or any of my siblings to call on them.

JuniorAsparagus Tue 02-Apr-19 15:58:00

Thank you Hazelnutpie. Unfortunately it asks for people in hectic cities, and I live in a town with a population of about 9,000.

Alsohuman Tue 02-Apr-19 16:04:46

I don’t think buying a house for ten years is particularly foolish. It’s exactly what we intend to do with a view to moving into a town or small city when it becomes necessary. My parents made their “sensible” move in their early 80s.

CaptainMyCaptain Tue 02-Apr-19 16:13:38

They were lucky to be able to. There is no way my parents would have been able to move in their 80s for all kinds of reasons. All my experience tells me to make that move before it becomes necessary not after.

Alsohuman Tue 02-Apr-19 16:24:36

It was before it was necessary. They were well over 90 before necessity kicked in. Great genes here!

Timeforachange68 Tue 02-Apr-19 18:01:48

juniorasparagus they also had to find jobs!

JuniorAsparagus Tue 02-Apr-19 18:50:41

Ah yes, a minor point!

stofi Tue 02-Apr-19 18:56:48

My pet hate, the couples who find the house of their dreams, wife in tears, everything is perfect and to top it all it's way below budget.

Then the announcer says at the end, 'They put in a low offer, it was rejected, so they've decided to widen their search',

LarryGreysonsDoor Tue 02-Apr-19 21:06:24

According to all the extremely ageist ideas on here, no one over sixty should be living rurally as they won't have easy access to shops, healthcare, public transport etc. They should all shuffle off to the nearest town or over 60's complex where they will be much 'happier'. Elderly people have lived rurally for years, and will continue to do so. Just because rural living doesn't conform to some, dare I say it, townies ideal of a Starbucks on every corner and buses every 5 minutes, doesn't mean it's wrong

My parents live very rurally and I am certainly not a ‘townie’ but I worry about them living where they do for much longer and I know they are looking to move into the town.
There is no doctors or shop in their village and they have no family nearby.
If they became unable to drive they would be stuck.
Of course elderly people have lived rurally for years but I dare say this was at a time when they had family near by and every village had a shop, post office and doctors. Ours no longer does.

SewingSee Tue 02-Apr-19 21:35:06

*I guess a few are ringers on these shows, or had big inheritance from Gran or Grandad/ trust funds etc etc.
There is money floating around - just not near me*

Yes 80s were great!

I take some comfort from the sense that though a lot of these retirees etc escaping to the country are pleasant people, they're often dull as dull can be. I sometimes wonder how they "made" their money too hmm!

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