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to ask how to find a job after 17 years as SAHM?

(78 Posts)
ThreeRandomWords Thu 14-Mar-19 19:28:16

Really want to find a job to have my own income and for my own sanity. But I feel I have lost my confidence after so much time out of the workplace and I am battling feelings of defeatism.

I can't go back to my old job as that was in IT and my skills are obsolete now. I have thought about training as a teacher maybe, which is something I have always fancied. I worry that I am too old (48) and too long out of the workplace to be of interest to anyone.

Any advice? Or inspiring stories of people in a similar position?

Thanks.

Jam82 Thu 14-Mar-19 19:29:29

I would start small and build your way up. Something like a dinner lady in a local school to get a bit of confidence and work experience under your belt and then take it from there x

mbosnz Thu 14-Mar-19 19:30:47

Um, what was your job in IT? Because your languages might be obsolete, but your training?

fitbciz1 Thu 14-Mar-19 19:35:47

I did an MSc and went back to software development after a 15 year gap. I was 46 when I got my lovely new job, nobody cared about my age. You’re never too old smile

ThreeRandomWords Thu 14-Mar-19 19:35:55

I was a Cobol programmer.

ThreeRandomWords Thu 14-Mar-19 19:37:24

What was your MSc in, if you don't mind me asking?

To be honest, I never loved my job, but I was well paid.

jellymaker Thu 14-Mar-19 19:37:39

You have one life . Don't waste it thinking you can't do something. Sorry to sound dramatic but my friend died last year unexpectedly. It really made me reevaluate what I believe about myself. If you want to do it, do it. You have tonnes of skills from running a household that are transferable to loads of places. Being a mum requires hard work and resilience. We all know it's the toughest job in the world. You won't find another job that is tougher. Go for it

fitbciz1 Thu 14-Mar-19 19:43:52

It was a computer science one and I loved it. Didn’t like my job before my break (rubbish company), completely love my one now.

Ariela Thu 14-Mar-19 19:45:29

Heaps of articles about over 50s going into teaching.
eg www.telegraph.co.uk/goodlife/11742224/Why-the-best-teachers-are-over-50.html

Justanotherlurker Thu 14-Mar-19 19:48:12

Cobol is still sought after in legacy system programming, depending on where you are in the country you could just do a bit of refresh and get some interviews easily.

RoseGoldJuliet Thu 14-Mar-19 19:50:05

One of my friends trained as a teacher when she was 47, and was HOD when she retired! She was brilliant.

jennymalone Thu 14-Mar-19 19:50:09

a dinner lady in a local school to get a bit of confidence and work experience

I think this is terrible advice for someone who's worked in a professional career job with a computer science background.. might be ok for someone wanting to get any work experience having never had a job, but not great for the OP.

Op, look at some of the "return to STEM" jobs/support groups, there's many available at big employers and professional associations due to the STEM skills gap. Some offer more support than others, it depends where you are/what you could commit to.

dizzycatdance2 Thu 14-Mar-19 19:51:51

I went back into it after 16 year gap. I wrote ,not emailed, local companies I thought might suit, offered to work for a couple of days a week to "try me out" (asks give me a chance to see if I could still do it) .
I wrote to 13, got relies from 3 and have been with one of those since 2015.
Worth a shot if you aren't currently working so not "losing" a wage.

mbosnz Thu 14-Mar-19 19:56:05

Okay, talking to DH who is reasonably high up in IT, COBOL being one of those vanishing languages, can be highly paid if you can find the work in it. But can be hard to retrain in the modern languages.

But if you didn't enjoy it, where is your passion? You're clearly intelligent and capable. I'm 47. It's really easy to think we're further over the hill than we actually are, I reckon.

Justanotherlurker Thu 14-Mar-19 20:09:31

Okay, talking to DH who is reasonably high up in IT, COBOL being one of those vanishing languages, can be highly paid if you can find the work in it

If you have expertise in a legacy language you will not really need to touch modern languages, its sought after and any work history however far back and can pass a tech test will be in demand.

Don't need anyone's DH as there are plenty of us on here working high up in IT (sorry but the 'I asked my DH' kind of annoys me)

GeorgeTheBleeder Thu 14-Mar-19 20:20:57

A brand, shiny new qualification would be a good place to start. Studying something you're interested in amongst a probably diverse group of people is both exciting and challenging. And combined with maturity you're likely to sweep through exams and graduate with impressive new skills.

Anything you'd like to try?

Jimjamjong Thu 14-Mar-19 20:21:28

I have just been to a meeting where they are recruting Cobol programmers and providing the training. It's not obsolete, apparently it is very much used by banks, transport companies, etc... but it's not that easy to find people trained in Cobol. I am on the other side of the channel but worth having a look around. You could also retrain in Java with a 3 months training course.

GeorgeTheBleeder Thu 14-Mar-19 20:41:56

I have to say, I too find it worrying that anyone might suggest a previously highly paid and skilled professional could only aspire to (forgive me) very low status work after being a SAHM. How on earth would women ever progress in the workplace, and have any power in the world, if that were the case?

I probably haven't put this well. Of course minimum wage, unskilled jobs are worthwhile. But they are not automatically the correct realm for every mother. Nor for anyone who might have had a break from work for any number of reasons.

Jam82 Thu 14-Mar-19 21:00:13

GeorgeTheBleeder I work in a school. Almost everyone of our dinner ladies have previously held good careers and are finding their feet getting back into the workplace. They tend to only stay for around 6 months after it has given them a confidence boost and the realisation that they can return to work and that it’s not as hard as they built it up to be in their heads. When they leave a lot go into teacher training, but I have known others go back into their former careers after leaving, so maybe get off your high horse? 😂

Jam82 Thu 14-Mar-19 21:01:24

Oh and btw we have male ‘dinner ladies’ too before she start on your feminist crusade again

Justanotherlurker Thu 14-Mar-19 21:04:51

I have to say, I too find it worrying that anyone might suggest a previously highly paid and skilled professional could only aspire to (forgive me) very low status work after being a SAHM. How on earth would women ever progress in the workplace, and have any power in the world, if that were the case?

Whilst I agree with your overall statement, a developer with apparent COBOL experience (the time out is becoming somewhat irrelevant in legacy systems) wouldn't be posting a thread on how to find work.

Its a confidence issue, if she has the knowledge she will be in demand and highly paid, re training now is a cost negative that if you include having to learn new languages so you can teach will be more cost effective of being a highly paid dev on legacy systems and learn on the job.

Lwmommy Thu 14-Mar-19 21:05:29

Looks like Cobol dictates a pretty good salary and benefits

jobs.trovit.co.uk/index.php/cod.search_adwords_jobs/type.0/what_d.cobol%20developer/tracking.%7B"acc"%3A118%2C"c"%3A903991677%2C"a"%3A45749604860%2C"k"%3A299346943570%2C"d"%3A"t"%2C"targetid"%3A"kwd-299346943570"%2C"cr"%3A"213359028362"%2C"ap"%3A"1t2"%2C"n"%3A"g"%7D/ppc_landing_type.2/origin.11/device.t?gclid=CjwKCAjw96fkBRA2EiwAKZjFTW1HW-f65b2YNxZmvE4b4njtjBvwwHZS30JmxLRNX01FTekiBhOQwhoCvFwQAvD_BwE

GeorgeTheBleeder Thu 14-Mar-19 21:07:32

Is it me - or is it my new name?

Everyone seems to want to fight me now ... confused

Justanotherlurker Thu 14-Mar-19 21:11:27

Everyone seems to want to fight me now ...

No one is fighting you, its a continuation of discussion as the OP hasn't come back

Mixingitall Thu 14-Mar-19 21:14:17

Apply and see what happens. I was a SAHM for 8 years, applied for a role in the field of IT I worked in before and got a great job on a great salary. IT changes so fast that an understanding of technology and the technical mind to learn are big assets in themselves. Being personable goes a long way too! Good luck, don’t let confidence hold you back.

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