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To think that letters home from school should not be hopping with typos, misused words and bad grammar?

(137 Posts)
ReanimatedSGB Wed 06-Mar-19 15:27:00

I was annoyed enough with the Momo letter anyway (yeah, thanks for including a picture of the fucking thing, DS had nightmares) but it's riddled with bad grammar and spelling errors. Now the school newsletter announces that 'Exam's' will be starting next month.

AIBU to email them a notice of my hourly rates for proofreading?

MaMaMaMySharona Wed 06-Mar-19 15:31:07

I'm a stickler for spelling and punctuation so this would drive me absolutely insane. I'm not sure whether I'd say anything for fear of being 'that parent' but it doesn't set a good standard.

MmaMakutsi Wed 06-Mar-19 15:34:54

Send it back by return of post with corrections in red pen. Add that detention will be on Friday at 4pm

SileneOliveira Wed 06-Mar-19 15:35:10

Send it back with the errors corrected in red pen. Go on, you know you want to...

sparepantsandtoothbrush Wed 06-Mar-19 15:36:15

I'd send it back corrected but would post it so they didn't know it was me!

gamerchick Wed 06-Mar-19 15:37:47

I couldn't get over the bairns EHCP. It's wincing territory reading that thing.

SukisKettle Wed 06-Mar-19 15:41:09

We had one a while ago about 'Sport's Day'. Did aged 8 was delighted when that letter came home. They'd been told to look out for rogue apostrophes for their homework. Part of me did wonder if it was wrong of me to allow her to take it back into school to show her teacher but the devil in me won. She got 5 house points for it anyway!

RiverTam Wed 06-Mar-19 15:42:43

as a publishing professional this drives me nuts. It's so unprofessional. Though our school types everything in Comic Sans...

Nautiloid Wed 06-Mar-19 15:42:53

I always wince at this!

CaptainMyCaptain Wed 06-Mar-19 15:45:47

It's all too common now sadly. When I was teaching the old headteacher wouldn't let any letter go out to parents without checking it first. She also proof read all children's end of year reports and would change commas she didn't agree with.

EnglishRose13 Wed 06-Mar-19 15:48:26

My mum was an English teacher and head of a department.

My school was known for sending letters home due to trivial matters (one example being the same trousers that were approved on the Friday, suddenly being unacceptable to the same teacher the following Monday!)

She was known for sending letters back to my school that she had corrected for them.

Nightmare 😂

RiverTam Wed 06-Mar-19 15:51:10

I must say these comments are great, whenever there have been threads like this in the past the usual response is normally along the lines of 'well, they're really busy and it doesn't really matter anyway'.

ChoccieEClaire Wed 06-Mar-19 15:53:15

My DDs school once sent a letter asking them to bring Willies to school for a trip...grin

Duchessgummybuns Wed 06-Mar-19 15:53:43

My daughter’s teacher sent a letter that the childrens’ “draws” would have to be emptied. My eye is still twitching.

JustAnotherPoster00 Wed 06-Mar-19 16:01:25

Absolutely OP any letter home should be a well crafted prose, on vellum

LeekMunchingSheepShagger Wed 06-Mar-19 16:07:20

It really annoys me that every letter school sends home is littered with spelling mistakes. The last newsletter was two full sides of A4 and didn't contain one single comma.

One of the other parents did correct one once and send it back covered in red pen. I thought that was a bit twattish tbh.

costacoffeecup Wed 06-Mar-19 16:11:02

I'd correct it and send it back. But I wouldn't say who it was from 😀

Seriously though, teachers should be getting this stuff right. They're supposed to be teaching it after all.

CatToddlerUprising Wed 06-Mar-19 16:16:12

I know a head of English whose grammar and punctuation is appalling - official emails, letters, teaching in lessons etc

sackrifice Wed 06-Mar-19 16:17:09

Exam's what?

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 16:22:53

Why does it matter? These people producing these letters aren’t professionals and as long as you read and understand the message, what’s the problem?

ShannonRockallMalin Wed 06-Mar-19 16:28:30

Absolutely with you OP. In addition to the poor spelling and grammar, I can’t bear the sloppy presentation of many school letters I receive. I’m not expecting a beautifully formatted masterpiece, but sometimes these letters seem to be random snippets of unrelated text in different fonts and sizes just stuck on a page. I’ve worked in publishing so perhaps I’m a bit over sensitive but surely a quick proofread is in order before they send these letters out?

lovelilies Wed 06-Mar-19 16:28:30

It would really get on my tits too. So far we've been lucky but if I ever get the chance, I will correct it grinwink

Bunnybigears Wed 06-Mar-19 16:31:09

ivykaty44 the problem is the people producing the letter are professional secretaries/receptionists. I am a secretary/receptionist and I would be hung for these sort of errors. Sometimes I do make errors outside of work through rushing etc but in work I couldn't send out a letter with errors in!

Otter46 Wed 06-Mar-19 16:31:25

We get a weekly newsletter every Friday and it's just so badly written, drives me mad!

LittleCandle Wed 06-Mar-19 16:46:09

I used to send back the letters corrected with red pen and I made sure that they knew who did it. On one famous occasion, I was asked to go on the school trip (I always went, due to DD's allergies). I replied that I did not know what I would be doing on X day in 4 years time. I knew when the trip was, and the date and the year AND the day were all wrong. The head was very cat's bum mouth when he got my note.

The school secretary was a lovely lady, but had less than no grasp of grammar or spelling. The head was a lazy bastard and never read anything that went out to the parents. When the inspectors came, I gave the school a really bad rating, and included copies of the notes sent home. Of course, the school had done nothing apart from stuff solely to impress the inspectors and so got a good pass.

The next head of that school was even less able than the original one and I removed DD2 to a school which was much better. Pity I hadn't done it earlier.

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 16:46:57

Bunnybigears I was always told by the professionals I’ve worked with that to be a professional you need to have studied extensively to achieve your qualifications.

School receptionist are lovely and do a great job but I think people are expecting far to much from them and it’s unfair.

AmIRightOrAMeringue Wed 06-Mar-19 16:49:00

I thought you could use an apostrophe at the end of a word to signify the word had been shortened. So photographs often becomes photo's. So maybe they are saying exam's as a shortened form of examinations? My grammar is rubbish though so likely to be wrong on this!

Malbecfan Wed 06-Mar-19 16:54:20

Like LittleCandle, I too corrected mistakes in red and didn't care that they knew it was me. The acting Head actually thanked me for doing it.

In my current school, the dragon receptionist thinks she knows it all because obviously a degree and postgraduate teaching qualification is handed out to just anyone, whereas a receptionist knows good grammar from birth My head of department writes very well but madam receptionist cannot resist changing things. Often this renders the letter useless (like her) so we bypass the system and send them out ourselves.

The last Head had a tenuous grasp of spelling and grammar and we often had to correct his stuff. The current one is very much better (in so many ways) but sadly the admin staff who send things out are not.

Pilgit Wed 06-Mar-19 16:54:42

I once corrected the spelling and grammar on a literacy display! Wasn't very popular but if you're going to do it - do it right!

Someone above said the office staff shouldn't be expected to get this right. I disagree. These letters are the public face of the school and give a bad impression. It makes people question the quality of education there. Whether it's fair or not on the office staff this is the way it is.

ReanimatedSGB Wed 06-Mar-19 16:59:41

Given the big deal that is being made of correct grammar for primary school DC, to the point that the poor little sods are having sleepless nights over their SATs already, I think it's fairly shit that school staff are allowed to get away with bad grammer and spelling errors TBH.

supersop60 Wed 06-Mar-19 17:07:52

A school where I work had their school show recently, and in the programme, the main parts were listed as "Principles".

Brilliantidiot Wed 06-Mar-19 17:08:38

I understand that an apostrophe between the end of the word and an s is the apostrophe stands for the I in is. So photo's would mean 'photo is' as in 'The photo's over there'. 'The photo is over there' and that an apostrophe at the end of a word that ends in s is changing it to plural so more than one photo is photos' BUT I'm not that sure on it either!
My autocorrect bloody changes stuff all the time to not what I mean when I put an apostrophe in, so I'm not too worried when I read stuff like that in general.
Did just read a police statement with 'should of' instead of 'should have' it's a completely different word and makes no sense, but it is obvious what is meant so I think it's just my personal view on that one.
Do think it's poor form from a school though.

wildbhoysmama Wed 06-Mar-19 17:09:34

piglit you've got it completely right, it's the face of the school and needs to be checked by the head/ depute.

I often had to hide behind my hands walking through nursery- their displays were truly awful, written, I think, by a trainee not long out of school.

My children now grimace when I change notices in public places with a pen!

Photo's is not correct to the PP- apostrophes are used to show contraction e.g don't , shan't etc or to show possession e.g. Nicola's purse/ children's play area/ parents' evening- depending on singular or plural.

To another pp I think comic sans is a common dyslexia friendly font. Cream background is also recommended for the same reason.

supersop60 Wed 06-Mar-19 17:10:18

ivykaty - maybe the receptionists are lovely, but someone needs to proofread what they send out.
It's all about communication and meaning. I'm fed up of having to mentally translate what someone has written, to find out what they actually mean.

StealthPolarBear Wed 06-Mar-19 17:16:41

I'm sick of should of.

FrancisCrawford Wed 06-Mar-19 17:16:45

These people producing these letters aren’t professionals

Yes they are. They are professional teachers, professional teaching assistants, professional secretaries etc - they aren’t just doing it for a laugh

as long as you read and understand the message, what’s the problem?

As Shakespeare so rightly said, “aye, there’s the rub”.
Because punctuation makes sentences make sense. Faulty punctuation can change the entire meaning.

Schools above all should prioritise correct spelling and punctuation in all correspondence

CountessVonBoobs Wed 06-Mar-19 17:18:15

I am a secretary/receptionist and I would be hung for these sort of errors.

[small voice] it's "hanged"

I'm sorry

I'll see myself out

Bunnybigears Wed 06-Mar-19 17:19:28

ivykaty44 maybe you have to study extensively to be a professional surgeon but to be a professional secretary you just have to be bloody professional and spell things correctly and put the right dates and basically make your letter make sense.

TheBrilloPad Wed 06-Mar-19 17:21:44

@RiverTam I believe the reason why so many schools use Comic Sans as a font is that every other font available on Microsoft represents the letter "a" exactly how it is written in this mumsnet font. Whereas if you look at the letter "a" in Comic Sans, it is formed correctly, like you would teach to children.

PurpleMice Wed 06-Mar-19 17:22:23

There's a good explanation of why "exam's" is not correct here: www.sussex.ac.uk/informatics/punctuation/apostrophe/contractions

Basically it's the difference between contractions (which are valid) and "clipped forms", which are not.

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 17:25:14

A surgeon is a professional, a secretary isn’t a professional, and that is the problem due to expectation given a similar standard.

FrancisCrawford Wed 06-Mar-19 17:27:16

A secretary is certainly not an amateur

Expecting correct spelling and grammar is a very basic standard in any school,communication.

Ilove31415926535 Wed 06-Mar-19 17:29:11

Comic. Motherfucking. Sans.
No, YANBU! grin
One of my favourites was when a school disco letter (written in Comic. Motherfucking. Sans!!) announced that glowstick's, tattoo's and snack's would be available.
This is the establishment I trust to teach my children!! confused

caughtinanet Wed 06-Mar-19 17:30:52

Of course proper SPAG matters, schools can't have double standards where they expect the pupils to learn it for their SATs but condone errors in school communications. Are the teachers wasting their time?

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 17:31:33

I doubt a school secretary would even earn an average uk wage of £28k and that’s in no way belittling the work they do

MillicentMartha Wed 06-Mar-19 17:33:32

I think it's fairly shit that school staff are allowed to get away with bad grammer and spelling errors TBH *grammar

Sorry, SGB but it’s such a great case if Muphry’s Law , I couldn’t resist.

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 17:35:51

Yet everyone understood the sentence that SGB had written, so what was the problem?

Skittlesss Wed 06-Mar-19 17:36:11

Countess, I was thinking the same grin

kaldefotter Wed 06-Mar-19 17:36:29

Sorry, AmIRight, but you are a meringue. wink

Skittlesss Wed 06-Mar-19 17:37:36

case if Muphry’s Law

Murphy strikes again grin

FrancisCrawford Wed 06-Mar-19 17:39:56

I doubt a school secretary would even earn an average uk wage of £28k and that’s in no way belittling the work they do

What has that got to do with anything?

I was earning less than that when I was called as an expert witness in a court case. And, as it turned out, it was my evidence that was the deciding factor and the judge personally praised my work.

UtterlyDesperate Wed 06-Mar-19 17:41:55

Ah
i helped my uncle jack off a horse

But you understand what I mean, right?!

x2boys Wed 06-Mar-19 17:43:59

Tell me about it a @gamerchick when I first got ds2 statement as it wa than they gave in the wrong chromosome disorder ,my friend was very happy with her sons Ehcp other than the fact they called him Sam he isn't called Samhmm

kingfisherblue33 Wed 06-Mar-19 17:44:58

I would be hung for these sort of errors.

You are not a tapestry. It's hanged.

Slowknitter Wed 06-Mar-19 17:46:38

YANBU, it's double standards. School secretary jobs are highly sought-after. Schools should be able to employ secretaries who can send out letters with correct grammar. The Head at ds' primary school often sends out emails to parents himself. They are not always free of grammatical errors either.

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 17:46:40

Yes

But I would have included the word get before off

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 17:47:54

What has that got to do with anything?

You get what you pay for

RafaIsTheKingOfClay Wed 06-Mar-19 17:48:02

The surgeon comparison doesn’t really add up though. The correct use of apostrophes isn’t an essential job skill for a surgeon, it is for a secretary. And it doesn’t require years of degree level study.

greenelephantscarf Wed 06-Mar-19 17:53:11

comic sans and rogue aprostophes here...

<runs away screaming>

exLtEveDallas Wed 06-Mar-19 17:54:15

Sorry SGB I'm going to slightly derail your thread (I agree with you though, SPaG should be immaculate in all school missives)

Anyone at a school (working or parent of) where they are using Comic fucking Sans could suggest they download Sassoon Penpals font for their work if they are using it due to the 'correct a' for the children. I've been fighting this battle for a while because of my hatred for Comic Shite and found the Sasson fonts (including one that is perfectly joined up for KS2) has been widely praised, our local SEN team is recommending it as well.

(Sorry, as you were...smile)

WatcherintheRye Wed 06-Mar-19 17:55:57

I remember receiving newsletters from the dc's primary school, which often had a section pushing the school lunches, including a sample menu with the encouraging footnote 'crudities always available'. I know the dinner ladies had a fierce reputation, but....... shock grin

Jinglejanglefish Wed 06-Mar-19 17:56:38

I doubt a school secretary would even earn an average uk wage of £28k and that’s in no way belittling the work they do

We’re paid peanuts, doesn’t excuse it! It’s just lazy.

Pieceofpurplesky Wed 06-Mar-19 17:59:50

My Heqd would go ballistic at this and every letter has to be checked by a member of SLT before being sent out.

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 18:00:39

I’d be concerned about a report from a surgeon if it didn’t make sense, as his secretary would copy what she/he had written and that would cause problems

A school secretary wouldn’t have the same repercussions if they made similar errors

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 18:02:16

SLT means what?

Slowknitter Wed 06-Mar-19 18:04:38

Senior Leadership Team

RomanyQueen1 Wed 06-Mar-19 18:11:39

In my dd reception class there were plastic labelled boxes with various play things stored.
The best I saw was Roll Play. There was a TA who asked if she'd brung her teddy to school.
These people are educators.

GabrielleNelson Wed 06-Mar-19 18:13:43

I was at bog standard state primary schools in the 1960s and early 1970s. Understanding how to use apostrophes correctly and other basic aspects of punctuation, how to write grammatically and how to spell common words was expected of every child unless they had what wasn't then called a learning disability or specific learning difficulty. All our teachers could do it without even thinking about it. What went wrong?

Blenderthegoodmakeupwitch Wed 06-Mar-19 18:13:54

There was a thread at the weekend touching on this. Poster couldn't get sch admin role but those that did get role ,made error after error.

I agree, sch admins should be able to to produce grammatically correct documents.

Yes, point it out, it's a poor show!

Defenestrator Wed 06-Mar-19 18:18:42

I'm a professional secretary. That means I'm trained and experienced and I do it for a living. I am expected to have an excellent command of written English and I live in hope of earning £28k!

GabrielleNelson Wed 06-Mar-19 18:22:51

A cynic writes: Could it be possible that the headteachers and other members of the senior management team in many schools would be unable to check a test piece of writing, hence veto using that as part of the selection process? When I was at school, either it would have been taken for granted that a secretary could write grammatically or the head would have made the time to check all missives going home to parents.

I can't help thinking that perhaps some teachers and admin staff don't grasp that a good many parents do notice this stuff and judge the school accordingly. Dunning Kruger effect.

And yes, it does matter, because children end up in the jobs market and those who can't write grammatically, punctuate correctly or spell are going to be at a disadvantage for most of the better paid jobs.

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 18:23:33

I was at bog standard state primary schools in the 1960s and early 1970s. Understanding how to use apostrophes correctly and other basic aspects of punctuation, how to write grammatically and how to spell common words was expected of every child unless they had what wasn't then called a learning disability or specific learning difficulty. All our teachers could do it without even thinking about it. What went wrong?

What did the teaching assistants do in the 1960s state school?

CoffeeMilkNoSugar Wed 06-Mar-19 18:24:55

I have corrected school letters in the past with an attached note 'please correct and re-send'.

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 18:26:44

And yes, it does matter, because children end up in the jobs market and those who can't write grammatically, punctuate correctly or spell are going to be at a disadvantage for most of the better paid jobs.

Further up thread I was asked why it mattered what a school secretary earned, as I doubted it would be a well paid job achieving even national average earnings

YourSarcasmIsDripping Wed 06-Mar-19 18:27:01

Let's eat, Grandma!

Let's eat Grandma!

Save a life,use a comma.

MitziK Wed 06-Mar-19 18:27:38

It's what happens when schools employ whoever will work the required hours for the least amount of money, rather than being prepared to pay a little bit more for somebody who has higher qualifications or needs something that represents a full time, term time only job.

I twitch whenever I read some of the things sent out, but if I were to do the job, it would mean taking a paycut of approximately six thousand pounds and dropping two full grades with the consequent effects upon my pension, sick pay, projected redundancy sum and I don't have a wealthy husband to fund a desire to have all letters correctly typed. And no, I am not going to embarrass the typer by criticising her work; her line manager should be explaining it to her privately.

FamilyOfAliens Wed 06-Mar-19 18:30:04

One of my favourites was when a school disco letter (written in Comic. Motherfucking. Sans!!) announced that glowstick's, tattoo's and snack's would be available.
This is the establishment I trust to teach my children!!

I doubt very much that the letter was written by one of the teachers. More likely to have been a member of the PTA, who are volunteers. Anyone criticising PTA members’ grammar needs to get off their arse and volunteer.

Lovewinemorethanhusband Wed 06-Mar-19 18:31:32

It drives me nuts when the letters come home and it's full of spelling mistakes and things. I mentioned it one day to the receptionist when a particularly bad newsletter went out and asked if they were proof read at all as the mistakes were awful in it, she was like I do it all myself and no one else has ever mentioned any errors , I had to show her the mistakes for her to believe me !

goodwinter Wed 06-Mar-19 18:33:46

Don't schools use comic sans because it's an accessible font i.e. easier for people with dyslexia to read?

HollaHolla Wed 06-Mar-19 18:39:22

It’s like the old ‘I had all my teeth out and a gas fire put in....’
Use a comma/semi-colon/full stop. Dear Lord.

FrancisCrawford Wed 06-Mar-19 18:39:41

I’d be concerned about a report from a surgeon if it didn’t make sense, as his secretary would copy what she/he had written and that would cause problems

They are dictated.

GabrielleNelson Wed 06-Mar-19 18:42:43

ivykaty, we had no teaching assistants! Class sizes were 40+ and the teacher stood at the front and taught. I have no doubt at all that a substantial number of the children were not keeping up and many spent increasing amounts of time in the 'remedial' class or even disappeared to special school. But all the children of average ability were expected to spend approaching half the school week on learning to read and write (most of the rest of the time went on arithmetic). I was very lucky. Lots of kids my age were at schools where they were already jettisoning traditional primary education.

FrancisCrawford Wed 06-Mar-19 18:44:00

Further up thread I was asked why it mattered what a school secretary earned, as I doubted it would be a well paid job achieving even national average earnings

Which is irrelevant. Because learning how to use apostrophes and other basic rules of punctuation should be taught and learnt in primary school. It is a basic as learning times tables. It is not something difficult or unusual, far less something that only high wage earners could be expected to know. It is basic.

FrancisCrawford Wed 06-Mar-19 18:45:59

What did the teaching assistants do in the 1960s state school?

They didn’t exist.

But primary school children all learned how to parse a sentence, use apostrophes and knew when to use a colon rather than a semi-colon. In other words, basic grammar.

ginghamstarfish Wed 06-Mar-19 18:46:47

All too common everywhere, and I'm not sure it would be well received if you were to point it out to the school. I'd do it anonymously, but not expect it to have much effect. It's no wonder the standard of written English is going downhill if teachers can't get the basics right. One recent post on here about the grammatical horror 'I was stood/sat ...' had at least one teacher respond saying that they did not see anything wrong with this (or words to that effect). I despair.

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 18:51:31

FrancisCrawford, And do teaching assistants teach grammar in school or is this left to the teacher?

PinguDance Wed 06-Mar-19 18:53:42

Teachers don’t write these notices in my school - it’s office staff. Still not great!

llangennith Wed 06-Mar-19 18:55:55

Over 30 years ago I did my final 12 week teaching practice in a primary school and every day I was faced with display boards full of spelling mistakes. Excercise instead of exercise, scissers instead of scissors and many more. I didn't dare mention it to anyone in the school but did point it out to my college tutor when he visited. He agreed I should say nothing.

YourSarcasmIsDripping Wed 06-Mar-19 18:57:56

* And do teaching assistants teach grammar in school or is this left to the teacher?*

Sometimes they do. They might teach other subjects as well.

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 18:58:47

I always have to look up affect and effect, it wasn’t until a colleague pointed out that there was a difference I even realised I was getting this wrong 😬

MitziK Wed 06-Mar-19 19:01:03

@FrancisCrawford, one of the most basic rules taught in class would be to write 'Which is irrelevant, because...', 'Which is irrelevant - because...' or 'Because learning how to..., the earnings of a school secretary are irrelevant.' - not as you have typed.

It is as basic as learning times tables, too.

(They'd also be encouraged to find a different way of beginning three sentences, rather than using 'It is' every time.)

It should be known by all, but it isn't - and differences such as that are why somebody working on a School Reception Desk is a Grade 2 with such skills required as 'making a list' or 'taking a telephone message and writing it down' in the National Employment Competencies/Standards which are used to set the salaries of staff'.

If all you are prepared to pay is 5p/hr above National Minimum Wage (and then make it reduced hours, and then pro rata it down by 20% to allow for Term Time Only contracts), then you are not going to get people who are hugely confident or knowledgeable about the correct placement of apostrophes or other rules regarding punctuation.

ivykaty44 Wed 06-Mar-19 19:02:22

Sometimes they do. They might teach other subjects as well.

Will the teaching assistants be proficient at grammar?

Phineyj Wed 06-Mar-19 19:02:25

Hopefully the problem will solve itself when the current generation hit the workplace. I was educated in the 70s and 80s and formal teaching of SpaG pretty much disappeared by the time I was in mid secondary, but I think I must have picked it up from reading well written books. In any case, if SLT don't have the skills (many of them are v young these days) and aren't prepared to proof read, there's no easy solution.

Phineyj Wed 06-Mar-19 19:04:49

My DSis a a qualified teacher working as a TA. There are quite a lot of TAs in that position. She's extremely proficient at SpaG. But I don't think anyone's asked her to proof read school communications (they're too busy exploiting her by making her plan and teach for a pittance).

Phineyj Wed 06-Mar-19 19:06:18

SPaG. Forgot the Punctuation and not a term we ever used at school!

Heyha Wed 06-Mar-19 19:06:56

As a teacher I wish I could say that we don't get involved in writing letters and so on, but we do. Certainly at secondary I'd never allow a letter to go out that had anything to do with me if I hadn't written it myself. So it'll be the teachers or the leadership team making the mistakes in most cases. Drives me mad, there is a group of us pedants who sit together at lunch and red pen school communications then leave them strategically lying around. It makes us feel better anyway!

There is absolutely no excuse for a school to be sending out badly-written material or to have it on their website and I secretly applaud any parent who chooses to point out mistakes. Especially when you work for a head that insists on proofreading everything despite being one of the main offenders. Or the deputy that claims English as their second subject but couldn't use an apostrophe to save his life...

YourSarcasmIsDripping Wed 06-Mar-19 19:09:09

Don't know about others, I am.

Slowknitter Wed 06-Mar-19 19:14:49

Will the teaching assistants be proficient at grammar?

Not necessarily. Doesn't stop them being relied upon to teach classes. But then again, teachers aren't necessarily proficient at grammar either. I'm a teacher and have worked with many who aren't.

ElfrideSwancourt Wed 06-Mar-19 19:16:57

My DD's Y6 teacher used to make loads of mistakes in their homework - I started highlighting them because it bugged me so much, although it didn't make any difference.

I'm now a primary teacher and I triple check everything I send out.

MillicentMartha Wed 06-Mar-19 19:25:31

Sorry, SGB but it’s such a great case if Muphry’s Law , I couldn’t resist.
*of
That was me, that’ll teach me! blush grin

But it really is Muphry not Murphy.

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