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To think a baby in hospital is an exception to the rules

(266 Posts)
OnlyFoolsnMothers Mon 25-Feb-19 15:34:24

Thursday night my DD 18months had a seizure, no idea what was happening at the time. It was horrific, fortunately she is ok now (being referred for tests), but we were kept in hospital overnight and much of Friday whilst they ran tests.
Work have informed me I need take this as annual leave. Would your work follow the same line?

Gatehouse77 Mon 25-Feb-19 15:35:52

DH's definitely wouldn't. But it's a small company where everyone knows each other. Not sure what a larger corporation would do.

Gatehouse77 Mon 25-Feb-19 15:36:08

And fingers crossed for the tests!

Alsohuman Mon 25-Feb-19 15:36:49

You’d probably get compassionate leave in the public sector. I imagine a lot of private companies would make you take it as holiday.

peachgreen Mon 25-Feb-19 15:36:52

They'd probably give me the option of taking it as annual leave or unpaid carer's leave, I think.

MyDcAreMarvel Mon 25-Feb-19 15:37:58

Dh definitely be compassionate he works for the civil service.

Littlebelina Mon 25-Feb-19 15:38:10

Legally you can take off emergency leave for dependants but your employer doesn't have to pay you (mine would though within reason)

Twickerhun Mon 25-Feb-19 15:38:43

Quite possibly. When my DC nearly died in hospital I had to take a mixture of compassionate leave and annual leave. I was kindly told if I took compassionate leave when they were sick I couldn’t use it again if they died.

needsleepzzz Mon 25-Feb-19 15:39:24

No way, i would be allowed it as family leave, of which we get 5 days paid

Northernsights Mon 25-Feb-19 15:39:26

Mine would. Ds was in hospital for several weeks when he was 2. I had to use annual leave / make-up all the time. I work in charitable sector

Littlebelina Mon 25-Feb-19 15:40:04

www.gov.uk/time-off-for-dependants

Yura Mon 25-Feb-19 15:40:04

No way. big multinational here, they are quite generous

OnlyFoolsnMothers Mon 25-Feb-19 15:40:23

I was kindly told if I took compassionate leave when they were sick I couldn’t use it again if they die that’s vile!

needsleepzzz Mon 25-Feb-19 15:41:15

That is only applicable if the child is hospitalised. General illness you can work from home at manager discretion or take holiday

greendale17 Mon 25-Feb-19 15:41:21

No, my work would allow it and not log it as anything.

OnlyFoolsnMothers Mon 25-Feb-19 15:42:10

Work in a small office -10 people in the London office- corporate finance company! Checking my contract now on time off for dependants

justmyview Mon 25-Feb-19 15:43:06

I was kindly told if I took compassionate leave when they were sick I couldn’t use it again if they died shock

spreadingchestnuttree Mon 25-Feb-19 15:43:07

I'd have to take it as annual leave or unpaid leave. (Small, friendly, private company.)

Onefliesoverthecuckoosnest Mon 25-Feb-19 15:43:36

My14 month old DS spent 4 weeks in hospital, 300 miles from home and that was my AL for the year gone; it was either that or unpaid leave.

MondeoFan Mon 25-Feb-19 15:44:34

No mine wouldn't they would understand completely as we just get agency staff to cover when this type of thing happens, I probably wouldn't get paid for it though but they wouldn't expect me to take it out of my annual holiday.

SoyDora Mon 25-Feb-19 15:44:46

Anywhere I’ve worked (mainly large multinationals) would just let me take it and not log it as anything.

TFBundy Mon 25-Feb-19 15:45:17

I would expect to take it as AL or UL tbh.

Megan2018 Mon 25-Feb-19 15:45:37

We would allow it as contingency leave.
if it was longer than a couple of days then unpaid/annual - but up to 3 days would be allowed without issue.
They will generally allow up to 10 days in a rolling 12 months to deal with emergencies.

CandyPuff Mon 25-Feb-19 15:45:54

Would be compassionate leave for me

Comefromaway Mon 25-Feb-19 15:46:44

It would be unpaid compassionate leave or paid annual leave.

BarbarianMum Mon 25-Feb-19 15:47:08

Id have a choice. Annual leave if I wanted to be paid and unpaid leave if I didnt. Or make up the hours. Which is typical outside the civil service I think.

Just counted up and Ive been in A&E 12 times (inc 4 admissions) over the years so I guess its quite a common thing. Hope your lo makes a speedy recovery.

DeepfriedPizza Mon 25-Feb-19 15:47:26

Mine would let me have it off paid and without using my AL.

sleepylittlebunnies Mon 25-Feb-19 15:48:18

I’m a nurse in the NHS, it would be emergency annual leave or if I didn’t have any AL left then unpaid carers leave. Hope the test results are reassuring.

OnlyFoolsnMothers Mon 25-Feb-19 15:48:28

I’m confused- so there’s unpaid leave to deal with dependents and paid compassionate leave when a close relative is seriously ill...well which is it?

clairemcnam Mon 25-Feb-19 15:50:27

I would have to take unpaid leave or annual leave. I would take it as annual leave. It has been like that in a number of places I have worked so I would not find that unusual at all.

Noeuf Mon 25-Feb-19 15:50:59

https://www.gov.uk/time-off-for-dependants

This is the government position

But each organisation is free to develop a more generous or sympathetic policy so you need to look in your handbook really

PurpleDaisies Mon 25-Feb-19 15:51:41

I’m confused- so there’s unpaid leave to deal with dependents and paid compassionate leave when a close relative is seriously ill...well which is it?

It depends on the employer. You don’t have to be paid for compassionate leave.

Reastie Mon 25-Feb-19 15:51:54

Might be a bit discretionary of the workplace as to whether they deem it seriously ill (I presume it was set up to visit immediate family just about to die?). I was allowed compasionate leave when I was off the day my grandad died (helped calling ambulance etc) and for family funerals. Otherwise it’s always been my sick leave when I’m off ill or else unpaid dependants leave.

Twickerhun Mon 25-Feb-19 15:52:20

They may not think it’s serious enough to justify compassionate leave.

LostInShoebiz Mon 25-Feb-19 15:52:34

so there’s unpaid leave to deal with dependents and paid compassionate leave when a close relative is seriously ill...well which is it?

Children are dependents.

Sindragosan Mon 25-Feb-19 15:52:44

Would be expected to take either annual leave or parental leave (unpaid) for a whole day. Leaving in the middle of the day for an emergency would still be paid and not an issue.
Compassionate leave is generally only for deaths and beyond immediate family is at your manager's discretion.

clairemcnam Mon 25-Feb-19 15:53:06

Compassionate leave anywhere I have worked is only for an actual death.

asteri76 Mon 25-Feb-19 15:54:15

My work would allow us to take as much time off within reason.. paid and not using AL and if it's longer it would be up to the managements' discretion.. I work for advertising agency in London.. hope all goes well with the tests!!

OnlyFoolsnMothers Mon 25-Feb-19 15:54:26

They definitely understand the severity as my boss had the same thing with his 18yr old daughter a month ago, and he’s connected me to his wife for advice.

Checked my handbook, dependent leave unpaid, compassionate paid. Not sure whether to kick up a fuss.

MotherofDinosaurs Mon 25-Feb-19 15:56:22

Paid compassionate leave. I would never work for a company who didn't cover this.

MrsArchchancellorRidcully Mon 25-Feb-19 15:58:41

I work for a global not for profit. I have flexi time so I would take a couple of days of that. However failing that I'd take annual leave or unpaid leave. They would never just ignore it. It would have to be logged somehow.

elliejjtiny Mon 25-Feb-19 15:58:45

In dh's previous work it was unpaid parental leave. He was off for 2 weeks and then got a disciplinary so my pil had to take time of work to look after our older dc while I was in the hospital with our baby. Pil got fully paid compassionate leave for as long as needed (they took a week each).

youarenotkiddingme Mon 25-Feb-19 15:59:54

I'd get first 24 hours paid as emergency.
Unpaid after that.
Can't take annual leave as term time job!

PlainSpeakingStraightTalking Mon 25-Feb-19 16:01:30

NHS here - we get -

3 days compassionate
zero now on carers leave
and the rest is either unpaid or AL

amyboo Mon 25-Feb-19 16:02:34

I'd be able to take it as "special leave" (public sector - civil servant). We get 6 days leave for a seriously ill child per child/per year, and have to have a certificate from a doctor to use it. I used it when DS was hospitalised for a day surgery for example. We also get up to 6 days leave per child per year for when they're ill (which also requires a certificate), as does my DH who works in the private sector. We're not in the UK but a different EU country.

MrsJBaptiste Mon 25-Feb-19 16:02:45

I work in the public sector and this would definitely be a day taken as compassionate leave.

The pay in the public sector may be lower than we'd like but my work is just great for time off for hospital appts, school drop offs, taking flexi time, etc.

MrsArchchancellorRidcully Mon 25-Feb-19 16:05:09

Same as others, parental leave is unpaid unless it's for emergency childcare but we'd be expected to sort that out within 24 hrs. Compassionate leave is paid but usually for a death.

As for kicking up a fuss.... on what grounds. I hope your child gets better but businesses are not charities. If they have a policy I assume it's applied to all staff equally. I'd only kick off if my manager had been treated differently.

Mof3K Mon 25-Feb-19 16:06:27

I wouldn't have thought it was classed as compassionate leave. It would be unpaid dependent leave or carers leave in the NHS.
However Even if it is classed as paid compassionate leave it's not a limitless amount of time so you will need to check your policy.

IM0GEN Mon 25-Feb-19 16:06:41

When my DC nearly died in hospital I had to take a mixture of compassionate leave and annual leave. I was kindly told if I took compassionate leave when they were sick I couldn’t use it again if they died

Was that the NHS? When my DS was dying in hospital, they refused to give me parental or compassionate leave because you had to apply for that in advance. So my GP signed me off sick with stress.

My line manager phoned me up the next week and demanded that I come in for a medical with an occupational health doctor. I told them I couldn’t attend as we were at the hospital every day, DS wasn’t expected to live more than a few days.

So he phomed me back on the next Monday and was really cross to hear that Ds hadnt died yet. He died on the Wednesday and they sent me an appointment for a few days later , accompanied by a very rude letter.

So I went along to see this doctor in the week before the funeral . The doctor was utterly appalled and signed me off for the next 8 weeks ( I was 7 months pregnant ). Before that, I’d had one day off sick in the more than 10 years I’d worked there.

Todaythiscouldbe Mon 25-Feb-19 16:06:59

Compassionate leave is for the death of a close relative in my company. Dependents leave is for dealing with emergencies.

OnlyFoolsnMothers Mon 25-Feb-19 16:07:08

I think I’m extra pissed off as I work for a company where we work out of hours as the ‘norm’- when we take leave we aren’t allowed to put an out of office on and are still expected to check our emails etc.

TheSconeOfStone Mon 25-Feb-19 16:07:58

I work in the NHS and would probably get the first day off paid as an unplanned emergency while we put plans in place to find child care or whatever, but unpaid or AL if anything else was required. Not all public sector jobs are equal with pay and conditions.

SassitudeandSparkle Mon 25-Feb-19 16:09:00

Compassionate leave is at the discretion of the employer though, and dependent leave is meant to be short-term unpaid to make arrangements for cover so I wouldn't (personally) call this dependent leave because I'd fully expect that you'd want to be with your child.

While they are right in the legal sense, it is a disappointing stance to take.

OnlyFoolsnMothers Mon 25-Feb-19 16:09:04

IM0GEN omg!!! You poor thing, this made my blood boil

MrsArchchancellorRidcully Mon 25-Feb-19 16:10:33

OP your comment about annual leave and checking emails is a while different matter.

That I believe is illegal as it means you aren't actually being given proper leave. Do you have a union?

arethereanyleftatall Mon 25-Feb-19 16:11:35

I wouldn't kick up a fuss, I'd just thank my lucky stars that my dd was ok.

cjt110 Mon 25-Feb-19 16:13:22

I will ill in hospital having neuro surgery as a child and my Mum had to take unpaid leave. This was about 25 years ago.

Surely emergency time off for dependants is when they're sick at home, or child care falls through. Not when they are hospitalised. I would seek advice from HR if you have one.

OnlyFoolsnMothers Mon 25-Feb-19 16:14:26

No union, we aren’t supposed to “work” on leave but monitor our emails, forward them to someone who’s covering for us etc.
Fully appreciate its a different thing, I guess I’m showing how flexible and accommodating I think I am to them that it’s sad they can’t do that back.

“Disappointing stance”..so using this in my email back to them on this.

user1471426142 Mon 25-Feb-19 16:15:16

IM0GEN That Is a disgrace and made me angry just reading that on your behalf. Your manager should never have been allowed to manage anyone again after how you were treated. Did you raise a grievance?

For what it’s worth, my place is quite strict on annual leave or unpaid leave for normal childhood illness stuff but the two times my little one has been really ill, they’ve just written it off which has been really appreciated. You just don’t need the hassle.

As a manager, I’d try and stretch the rules as much as possible for anyone dealing with serious illness or bereavement to make their life as hassle free as possible. If I couldn’t, I’d just tell a report to get signed off with stress.

codenameduchess Mon 25-Feb-19 16:15:53

@IM0GEN that's awful, I'm so sorry for your loss and the appalling treatment you had.

@OnlyFoolsnMothers it'd be AL or unpaid for me too (public sector). Compassionate is generally if the close relative is dying/has died and is for a pretty small amount of time - I think our policy is 1 day up to 2 weeks depending on relationship (as in more for parent than great aunt).
I've had a fair few a&e trips with dd and always had to take AL or unpaid.

I hope your DDs tests are good news.

Aintlifelikethat Mon 25-Feb-19 16:15:59

I work in a university. I would be allowed time off for dependents (paid) in the situation you describe. We are also entitled to compassionate leave (again, paid) for situations like seriously ill close family member/ family funeral.

I guess it depends on your company policy though, and the kindness of your manager....

Queenofthestress Mon 25-Feb-19 16:18:33

My mums NHS, she had 3 days paid carers leave when I had to get a tumor removed

caringcarer Mon 25-Feb-19 16:18:55

Unpaid carer leave I think, or hols if you want it paid.

IM0GEN Mon 25-Feb-19 16:20:09

Thank you for the condolences, it was a long time ago so isn’t so raw now.

adaline Mon 25-Feb-19 16:20:08

We would get the option - unpaid leave, paid compassionate leave at the discretion of management or annual leave.

Mrscog Mon 25-Feb-19 16:26:56

I'm a manager in a university. I would let you use compassionate leave for this. You do only get 5 days a year though - so I can see how someone above was told they couldn't use it again if someone died. However if you had a serious bereavement you'd just get sick leave anyway - which where I would would be on full pay for a good while.

Annual leave isn't just for fun stuff though - it's an allowance to use when you need time out of work for anything your life demands. I have to remind people of this when they're moaning about taking it for household emergencies - broken down heating etc.

BoringPerson Mon 25-Feb-19 16:27:44

I'd expect to take it as unpaid leave or annual leave.

murmuration Mon 25-Feb-19 16:28:33

We get up to 3 days of carer's leave and 5 of compassionate. Carer's can be any emergency, but compassionate is death/serious illness. I know people who have been away months, e.g., during the prolonged death of a spouse, thus I assume they took the rest as unpaid.

Youshallnotpass Mon 25-Feb-19 16:32:15

Was that the NHS? When my DS was dying in hospital, they refused to give me parental or compassionate leave because you had to apply for that in advance. So my GP signed me off sick with stress.

My line manager phoned me up the next week and demanded that I come in for a medical with an occupational health doctor. I told them I couldn’t attend as we were at the hospital every day, DS wasn’t expected to live more than a few days.

So he phomed me back on the next Monday and was really cross to hear that Ds hadnt died yet. He died on the Wednesday and they sent me an appointment for a few days later , accompanied by a very rude letter.

So I went along to see this doctor in the week before the funeral . The doctor was utterly appalled and signed me off for the next 8 weeks ( I was 7 months pregnant ). Before that, I’d had one day off sick in the more than 10 years I’d worked there.

I hope you raised a grievance, this is beyond appalling. I think I'd have struggled not to hit my line manager in those circumstances.

Witchend Mon 25-Feb-19 16:36:37

With your scenario it sounds initially unfair that you can't take it as compassionate as a one off. But the problem is that if they let you for that then any child a&e followed by tests can be challenged that they should also be able to use compassionate leave.

To put it in context I don't use a&e much. In fact I rarely have been except when told To go by the GP.
There was one year where between my 3 DC (actually to be fair, 2 of them, the third has never been) I went 11 times in 5 months. (Hardly been since either)
All of them would have involved a day in a&e and 1-2 days of tests follow up.

So I can see why they'd be reluctant to set a precedent.

Aridane Mon 25-Feb-19 16:44:04

Copaona leaveis no

Aridane Mon 25-Feb-19 16:44:12

Eh?

Aridane Mon 25-Feb-19 16:45:04

Compassionate leave is not a statutory entitlement.

Emergency time off for dependants (or whatever it's called) is a statutory entitlement, albeit unpaid

Whatnotea Mon 25-Feb-19 16:46:26

In my old company hard nosed corporate affair, I had a team member whose grown up daughter with her own children was very sick (brain hemorrhage). At mine and 2 senior managers up the ladder's discretion she has nearly 3 weeks off to deal her daughter and the children. We said we do not want her to worry about money, it was not an issue and she was US based but reporting to me in the UK. She bought the kids back with her for the summer & we let her work from home.
I would have just given you the days off.

caughtinanet Mon 25-Feb-19 16:47:18

The only relevant issue is what your contract says, it doesn't matter what other employers offer surely

Of course your employer should honour what you are contracted to, I'm not sure what you will achieve by knowing what other people get apart from being more annoyed at the comparison.

At the moment I'm self employed so would get nothing, others get very generous treatment it seems. When I was in employment I would not have expected compassionate leave to cover my children being in hospital. In fact I can think of at least one occasion when I took holiday.

I hope your DC makes a full recovery.

Ilovewillow Mon 25-Feb-19 16:48:53

The comment is dispicable! As a small business owner we would have given it as compassionate leave and paid you. However, there would be no requirement to pay but I always take the view of how I would want to be treated! I hope that they are ok!

CouldntThink Mon 25-Feb-19 16:52:16

NHS here, it would be purely at my manager’s discretion. I’ve been made to take annual leave or take it as sick before.

WhatNow40 Mon 25-Feb-19 16:56:47

As other PPs have said, it's usual policy for unpaid leave or annual leave. The only discretion I've ever had on this is to allow people to make back the time, or take it from overtime worked but not yet paid.

"I was kindly told if I took compassionate leave when they were sick I couldn’t use it again if they died."

Yes, a good manager would need to find a way of broaching this as well. It's not fair to leave someone without the full knowledge of their options, only to then be in a worse situation financially when grieving. I would have also followed it with - cross that bridge if you need to. You have x days sick entitlement and stress of sick child/bereavement is a jolly good reason to be signed off for. It's a managers job to have these very difficult conversations and, while factually correct, the art is in the delivery.

littlepeas Mon 25-Feb-19 17:03:01

My dd was poorly as a baby and in and out of hospital for her first 6 months, including 3 stays of over 2 weeks (once on HDU, one in ICU and once for heart surgery) - one of these was far from home as it was the only hospital with an ICU bed. We had toddler ds to look after too and little family support. He had all the time off he needed on full pay - reading this thread has made me realise how exceptionally lucky we were.

maddening Mon 25-Feb-19 17:03:58

I get 5 fully paid emergency carers days per year and then it would be unpaid parental leave.

VanGoghsDog Mon 25-Feb-19 17:04:16

I’m confused- so there’s unpaid leave to deal with dependents and paid compassionate leave when a close relative is seriously ill...well which is it?

Dependents leave is a legal entitlement, unpaid (though your employer can pay if they want).

Compassionate leave is not a legal entitlement, it's entirely up to your employer.

VanGoghsDog Mon 25-Feb-19 17:05:33

You have x days sick entitlement

There is no such thing as 'days sick entitlement' - it's not the 1970s.

CottonSock Mon 25-Feb-19 17:06:29

I could have the time off, but wouldn't get paid. Public sector role

maddening Mon 25-Feb-19 17:07:40

Ps also possibility of compassionate I suppose dependant on circumstance and on a discretionary basis eg my previous employer allowed me to have a day so I could rush to my grandma as she had hours to live and I got to say goodbye

GrapesAreMyJam Mon 25-Feb-19 17:08:25

I think it depends on your job. I'm a nanny and I'd be given the time off paid and wouldn't need to make the time up or use my annual leave.

maddening Mon 25-Feb-19 17:09:16

Vangoch - perhaps they mean full pay sick - eg you get x amount at full pay tjru ssp after that

BuggerOffAndGoodDayToYou Mon 25-Feb-19 17:09:30

I’ve been in that situation... for me it was unpaid time off. As I work in a school there is no such thing as annual leave. DH would have been given the option of unpaid or annual leave (public sector).

WhatNow40 Mon 25-Feb-19 17:13:39

@VanGoghsDog

*You have x days sick entitlement

There is no such thing as 'days sick entitlement' - it's not the 1970s.*

Ok, poor choice of wording simply for speed.

I'd check the sick record, and length of service. Tell them their entitlement to paid sick leave, and how much of it they have used in this rolling period. Clarify it with a number. You have x days sick leave entitlement at full pay, and x days at half pay. If you were to be signed off, x days is the maximum you will receive full company sick pay for. You may want to bear this in mind when making decisions, as financial pressures can make a devastating situation intolerable.

Is that better?

AnneElliott Mon 25-Feb-19 17:16:23

I'd get compassionate leave but I am a civil servant.

I think DHs company would just write it off - they are a small private company but are like a family and so would just let him have what he needed.

ElfridaEtAl Mon 25-Feb-19 17:17:17

I work for the council and under ours its called Urgent Domestic Leave.

DaveCoachesgavemetheclap Mon 25-Feb-19 17:20:22

When my mum (who's 86) was taken to A&E after a fall, I stayed with her until she was admitted as she was very scared. I was there from 9pm on Sunday until they found her a bed at 3pm on Monday, so I had to ring work and told them I wouldn't be in. I teach in a small Primary School, so can't take annual leave, but if the Head had said I wouldn't be paid for that Monday, I would have thought it fair enough (She didn't, though!)

aliceelizaloves Mon 25-Feb-19 17:21:47

We've had something similar and both of us got it as compassionate leave. (Me- teacher, dh- civil service).

FermatsTheorem Mon 25-Feb-19 17:22:00

Public sector here - I've been granted compassionate leave while DS was in hospital.

DonutCone Mon 25-Feb-19 17:22:16

Compassionate is normally for when you have sufffered a bereavement though.

StarbucksSmarterSister Mon 25-Feb-19 17:23:32

Worked for a large multinational. No question, stuff like that was compassionate leave.

gamerwidow Mon 25-Feb-19 17:23:34

For the NHS staff I manage this would be annual leave or unpaid leave the same as any other leave to look after a sick child BUT if it had turned into a serious incident and the child was seriously ill rather than just having a nasty scare requiring an overnight stay I would try to work something out with HR. I think the official line is all carers leave is unpaid though.

BartonHollow Mon 25-Feb-19 17:24:10

Would definitely be CL here and it's a small business owned by 4 people whose morals I have reservations about as a result of working for them and I'm not alone

And even THEY wouldn't expect this sort of thing to be AL

BartonHollow Mon 25-Feb-19 17:26:22

@IM0GEN

That is absolutely fucking shocking and I hope he got some kind of comeuppance

BikeRunSki Mon 25-Feb-19 17:37:47

I’m in the public sector. DS was in hospital for 9 days when he was 17 months old. We work flexi time and was expected to use that first. Then I had a couple of days that I didn’t work anyway. Then DH stayed in hospital and i went to work. I did get a couple of days compassionate leave after I had used up other options, but not annual leave. My very rational and lovely boss pointed out that annual leave was for r & r, and being in hospital with a sick child was neither of those things.

perfectstorm Mon 25-Feb-19 18:15:11

My understanding is that paid compassionate leave is down to an employer's discretion. Unpaid leave for dependants is not, though it can't be so frequent or lengthy that it interferes with your ability to do the job - similar to sick leave in that way, I think? It seems wrong to me that you've been told you have to take it as annual leave. Perhaps they just don't know unpaid is an option? And could you afford it to be, if that's all that is available?

My husband was given a week of compassionate leave on full pay over the summer, but it was when I had complex (think 9 hours in theatre) cancer surgery, and was planned in advance. He also needed a day off at short notice before that when I had a PET CT scan, as I was fitted in a cancellation slot, and as that wasn't planned his manager had to take advice on whether that should be paid or unpaid. It came back as paid. So you can get compassionate leave without a death with some employers, but it may require blatantly life-threatening illness in a close family member, perhaps.

I do also think DH has extra sympathy because our eldest is ASD, and home educated, with the youngest at preschool. And he's never asked for or needed any allowances made before, for any reason, and he performs really well. But we're also very lucky in his employer. They're massively supportive and understanding.

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