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To do an intensive driving course?

(20 Posts)
IAmSamSamlAm Fri 12-Jan-18 22:47:17

Do they work? I've failed three times, but I do think it's mainly because of nerves. So I thought if I did 10 hours over 2 days, finishing with the test, it might make the nerves dissipate.

But do they work?

ThisLittleKitty Fri 12-Jan-18 22:57:05

Didn't work for my sister

IAmSamSamlAm Fri 12-Jan-18 23:09:37

sad did she have driving experience first? I've had hundreds of lessons, so I'm not a new driver hoping to pass in a week <hoping that makes a difference>

Jipiandme Fri 12-Jan-18 23:14:33

I failed my test twice when i was 17 so gave up. Then at 30 i did a two day intensive and passed. Definately worth it for me as i wouldn't have been able to keep up weekly lessons due to work pattern and i got it over and done with quickly. Go for it! Good luck smile

RosiePosiePuddle Fri 12-Jan-18 23:14:43

Have you considered an automatic. If your instructors have thought that you were ready 3 times and you failed I am not sure how repeating everything again will help. I drive an automatic after years of a manual. They are so easy to drive that you can concentrate on the road more easily which would probably help in a test.

dingdongdigeridoo Fri 12-Jan-18 23:16:20

I did a semi-intensive course over a month, so about 10 hours a week, and passed first time. However, I drive an automatic which makes a big difference. It might not be a bad idea to book a test and just get LOADS of lessons leading up to it, getting yourself used to being on the road.

I probably wouldn't book one of the intensive courses at a centre though, as they are often full of beginners, so you might not be on the same level.

Gladiola44 Fri 12-Jan-18 23:17:52

Yes it sounds like a good idea for you. It’s what a lot of the actors and actresses do to pass quickly in between filming jobs. Hope it goes well.

StickThatInYourPipe Fri 12-Jan-18 23:18:15

I don’t think they really exist - finding one for dp is like hunting for unicorns

NoSquirrels Fri 12-Jan-18 23:18:47

What have you failed on?

Most “intensive” courses are over 5 days, from scratch, culminating in the test. But if you just want 2 days, a regular instructor should be able to do this.

My driving instructor (I was a late learner) recommended no longer than 2 hr lessons, with 1.5ideal, because concentration dips. So you could get a test date & then book 2 or 3 days’ worth of lessons for the confidence boost leading up to it.

IAmSamSamlAm Fri 12-Jan-18 23:38:09

I have tried with an automatic car. It was a bit easier, but my instructor was horrible and made me cry, so I had to stop (he wasn't teaching me much at all anyway, but he was also horrid and pervy).

No other automatic instructors available for 6 months+.

I have diagnosed anxiety, which does really affect my grades in exams etc. Compared to coursework (I'm at uni).

I need to pass ASAP for a ton of reasons. And yes, I'd struggle with childcare and work to do a 2 hour lesson a week anyway (am a LP to a 2yo).

My instructor always said he'd pass me in an instant. But I just fall to pieces and do the most stupid shit in the lessons. I just want to pass so badly sad

crazycatgal Fri 12-Jan-18 23:46:26

If you fall to pieces during the test then an intensive driving course won't help you.

You can obviously drive at the standard to pass but your anxiety is affecting your performance. Have you spoken to your GP about taking beta blockers to control your anxiety symptoms when driving? I'm also have anxiety and am currently taking them when doing driving lessons.

NoSquirrels Fri 12-Jan-18 23:50:23

I'd struggle with childcare and work to do a 2 hour lesson a week anyway

Completely get how it’s easier to arrange one-off longer hours childcare than a 2-hr lesson per week as a regular thing.

But I meant - do it over 2 days, but ask the instructor you know & like. Pay them for an “intensive” course.

Have you had your instructor sit in on a test? Would that help, perhaps?

If it is anxiety leading to extreme nerves, can you ask your GP? Some are very sympathetic.

Do you fail on lots of small issues or major mind-went-blank stuff? People may be able to help more if you can be specific?

IAmSamSamlAm Fri 12-Jan-18 23:53:36

Yeah, I get prescribed propranolol PRN. Don't find they do much for me. They didn't help in my last test.

Thing is, I'm applying for lots of jobs for when I finish uni which you need a driving licence for. And my commute to uni is 2 hours each way, when in the car it would take 15-20 minutes. So I'm missing lots of lectures because I can't get there and go to work in the time I have. My teachers are understanding, but it's definitely having an impact on my grades.

Plus just all the regular things. Really want to take DD to a farm over the weekend, and I've got loads near to me, but all of them are going to require 2 trains, a rural bus and a good half an hour walk. Expensive, and taking 2 hours+ again with a 2yo who will be knackered after the journey and won't enjoy the day half as much . The journey would take less than half an hour, and be so so so much easier in a car.

BUT I feel my anxiety has got loads better in these past few months just due to personal stresses lessening (breaking up with abusive exP mainly). So maybe I'll do better in the future. But that still doesn't fix fitting in the lessons.

NoSquirrels Fri 12-Jan-18 23:55:11

How will you manage the intensive course with childcare?

IAmSamSamlAm Sat 13-Jan-18 00:01:47

But I meant - do it over 2 days, but ask the instructor you know & like. Pay them for an “intensive” course.

My favourite instructor who I learnt for years with and have known since I was a baby is too busy to take me on again.

Have you had your instructor sit in on a test? Would that help, perhaps?

I haven't. Maybe that would be a good option for the future.

If it is anxiety leading to extreme nerves, can you ask your GP? Some are very sympathetic.

I have gone to the GP tons over the past 8 years. I do think my anxiety's getting better, for the reasons I detailed below. They've tried me on a few different drugs, and I've had CBT. But mostly, I've had a really stressful life, and they've just said my anxiety is due to that more than anything.

Do you fail on lots of small issues or major mind-went-blank stuff? People may be able to help more if you can be specific?

Major stuff definitely. In my last test, I was doing great - and the examiner said my manoeuvre was turn in the road. Fab I thought; easiest one by far. Next thing I know, I'm on the road hurtling towards a tree. I heard - THE TREE, THE TREE. Anyway, I got a dangerous. My driving instructors been teaching 20 years and he said he'd only had 2 people get a dangerous. Usually if you get that, they stop your test and drive you back themselves, or make you walk (depending on which car you did the test in). blushblush I don't know what happened there, I really don't. I'd never even been taught turn in the road, just did it casually and perfectly in every lesson, as it's not really difficult at all, is it?

Apart from that from what I can remember from the past few tests, I've got a major for pulling out too quickly and lots of minors for hesitation. I just overthink things and so I can't quite get the timing right for stuff.

But surely all these kinds of things will help if the anxiety is beaten out of me 5 hours a day for a couple of days?

IAmSamSamlAm Sat 13-Jan-18 00:02:30

How will you manage the intensive course with childcare?

Take 2/ 3 days annual leave.

Brainfogmcfogface Sat 13-Jan-18 00:06:53

I spent a grand on an intensive course years ago and still failed 😏

crazycatgal Sat 13-Jan-18 00:14:15

What your instructor said about getting a dangerous fault is bullshit - I can't imagine that he's only had 2 in 20 years so don't be so hard on yourself.

NoSquirrels Sat 13-Jan-18 00:54:13

If you can find an intensive course for 2 days go for it ... I just think they’re mostly set up for 5+ days and £800+ which it sounds as if would be overkill.

5 hours @ £20-25 an hour over 3 days is only £250, and it might be better to spend this with a regular instructor.

But not sure I like the sound of not being taught a turn in the road - it is “easy” but you need to make sure your observations are 100% as that’s where you might fail, so a good instructor should have “taught” it.

Equally, timing- if you’re getting picked up on this then you need to understand why. Have you been taught the rule that at 30 miles p/hr if you’d cross on foot you have time to pull out? Driving instructors should be giving you theses strategies to use.

grobagsforever Sat 13-Jan-18 07:43:51

Hi OP. I had lessons at 17 and then again at 31 and just couldn't get to test standard with weekly lessons. At 34 I found myself the lone parent of two and so did an intensive course - I did six hours a day for eight days! Doing that amount of driving did really help with anxiety. I failed the test at the end of the course but then passed a few weeks later with 1 minor!

Absolutely do take the intensive route would be my advice

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