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To think with mothers like this it is not surprising certain children don't get top grades at school

(101 Posts)
mountford100 Thu 19-Oct-17 14:27:08

Pupil who dyed her hair BLUE to 'boost her confidence after being bullied' is put into isolation by school.

www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/pupil-who-dyed-hair-blue-13772751

The parents can't wait until the media contact them, it is like all their christmases have come together when the papers bother to contact them.
Then you say the same picture of a girl/boy dressed in their school uniform surrounded by the parents enjoying the adulation of the media.

This is more important to these people than the fact their child has been excluded from school for stupid and disruptive behaviour . The behaviour is not just encouraged by these parents but actively facilitated (who gives the child the money to have silly haircuts shoes trousers etc). The child's parents will then declare they don't want their children ending up like them. However, they are totally complicit in why their child will end up with poor with their distain for the authority of school rules.

mountford100 Thu 19-Oct-17 14:28:14

See the same picture time and time again.

TheRollingCrone Thu 19-Oct-17 14:31:35

idiot mothers biscuit

Jellybean85 Thu 19-Oct-17 14:46:24

Well actually this story does just refer to a mother/grandmother but yes fathers can be idiots too confused

The picture shows it as very blue and even when tied up it’s still visible. There are other ways to boost confidence with in the rules!!

Awwlookatmybabyspider Thu 19-Oct-17 14:47:52

What about the "idiotic" bullies and "idiotic" school for allowing the bullying to continue. Do they not need a kick up it somewhere a long the line or are you a victim blamer.
The idiotic mother only got her child hair dyed to help boost her confidence. After having to watch her child endure constant tauñts from cunting bullies or did you conveniently not read that part.

EnidNextDoor Thu 19-Oct-17 14:49:51

Umm...is it not actually green?

gabsdot Thu 19-Oct-17 14:50:16

Those women are scary looking.

LittleBooInABox Thu 19-Oct-17 14:50:36

If the school tackled the bullying problem, maybe it wouldn't have got to the need for this statement?

NoCryLilSoftSoft Thu 19-Oct-17 14:51:53

Other than a photograph that story doesn’t refer to her mother at all. What makes you think her mother allowed her to do it?

1stTimeMama Thu 19-Oct-17 14:52:49

The student should be allowed to do whatever they like with their own hair. I think it's ridiculous that a school has the power to dictate what a person can and can't do cosmetically.
The bullies should be the ones being punished!

Just one more reason not to send my children.

LittleLights Thu 19-Oct-17 14:53:16

I'm assuming they knew the school rules, then went against them and it could of waited till half term.

Trueheart1 Thu 19-Oct-17 14:53:46

I couldn't agree with you more. There are some people who will always blame others and not follow the rules. I doubt she is actually being bullied, it is just an excuse to do as she pleases.

TsunamiOfShit Thu 19-Oct-17 14:54:25

To place someone in isolation is a bit extreme for this, isn't it? It's only hair!

OstentatiousWanking Thu 19-Oct-17 14:54:58

How is a colour disruptive?

Alvinstail Thu 19-Oct-17 14:55:12

So does being bullied allow her to flaunt the rules.

Do school rules not apply if your a victim?!

Op I agree. Idiots.

Anecdoche Thu 19-Oct-17 14:55:21

aren't they just? It'd be a brave fucker to have a go at their kid!

The bullying should have been stamped on by the school. Hopefully it was.

But the hair is a seperate issue. You don't get an exemption from the school dress code as compensation for being bullied.

tbh, I actually can't see what the big bloody deal is with hair. It's just hair. It doesn't prevent you from learning and what is so scary about a hair dye anyway?

But. The schools have decided that this ban is important and so either suck it up or campaign to change it. don't just rock up with blue hair and expect it to be ok.

mountford100 Thu 19-Oct-17 14:55:25

I go on to say parents further down the posting indicating that fathers are just as liable, if not more likely to encourage their offspring to confront authority. I think some parents use their children as a means of expressing their contempt for the education they received !

This is particularly sad because the children being excluded for such things appear to be the most in need of all the time possible in education.

LittleLights Thu 19-Oct-17 14:55:36

The school should of done more about the bullying then perhaps the need for boosting confidence would not of arisen, had they addressed the issues sooner.

Iamagreyhoundhearmeroar Thu 19-Oct-17 14:55:40

Something tells me this one wasn't exactly on course to get top grades anyway... Mum and Grandma look like complete morons.

jay55 Thu 19-Oct-17 14:56:22

The school probably has a bullying policy that it didn’t stick to. So why should the kids stick to the rules?

I think the time has past for schools to be hung up on kids.

QuestionableMouse Thu 19-Oct-17 14:56:29

What difference does it make what colour her hair is? One of the lecturers at my uni has pink hair. It's fab.

I'd also say a good 40% of students have bright hair. It's not stopping them learning.

SoupDragon Thu 19-Oct-17 14:58:54

My main thoughts are that it looks dreadful and I wouldn't want to mess with her mother or grandmother.

WishfulThanking Thu 19-Oct-17 15:00:13

I think her hair looks amazing actually grin, but yes it's against the school's rules, so I am not sure why she is in the paper. The comments on that article are disgusting, and the mother is on there defending herself. People are insulting her lack of intelligence/education etc. Britons love to slag off those they see as beneath them.

smerlin Thu 19-Oct-17 15:00:29

Love all the posters saying 'the school should have done more to stop the bullying'

Clearly never worked in a school/with teens. Bullying is one of the absolute hardest things to deal with as a school. We spend hours upon hours working on this. Workshops, assemblies, PSHEE about not bullying. Restorative work, sanctions, exclusions. It is still one of the hardest things to 'solve' as a school, particularly with social media being part of it and with how sly the 'bullies' can be.

Still not an excuse to break the rules though hmm

editingfairy Thu 19-Oct-17 15:01:10

Um. All we have to go on here is the gran saying the girl was bullied. We have no way of knowing what happened or what the school did to help. In fact, the school says she was 'bullied and taunted in primary and secondary' - two different schools.

For whatever reason, this family has an agenda and the attitude that they can do what they want and school rules don't matter.

With families like that... who needs enemies?

Were there really no other ways they could think of to increase her self-esteem??? Really?

And if you were shy and bullied, would you want to dye your knee-length hair (!) blue? or even green?

It's all a bit mad. And the poor girl - is this really the kind of publicity she needs? Her gran and mum look ... scary.

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