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Feeling irrationally annoyed

(21 Posts)
beCreativeInitiate Thu 05-Oct-17 13:34:44

AIBU feeling irrationally annoyed at the (thankfully confined to MN) use of 'think' when it's either entirely unnecessary or an annoying synonym for 'for example'?

I let most SPAG issues wash over me. Reflexive pronoun abuse doesn't bother me. Homophone confusion gets barely a look.

Fucking "*THINK*" however...

Grrrrr!

NoSquirrels Thu 05-Oct-17 13:40:14

I'm prepared to agree with a petty SPAG post in principle ... but I need more. What exactly is the misuse you speak of? Example?

beCreativeInitiate Thu 05-Oct-17 13:44:55

Maybe it's only me who notices!

For example:

We have just spent the last 6 months doing the place up spending a large amount of money in the process (think new kitchen, bathroom etc) and had literally just finished all this

"I would like to do travel reviews for a niche market (think holiday destinations/hotels/restaurants for a BME group)"

Even the strange use of 'literally' didn't annoy me in the first example.

"think" however ... !!!!

Subtlecheese Thu 05-Oct-17 13:50:14

SPAG really grates for me. You cannot please all the people..etc.

beCreativeInitiate Thu 05-Oct-17 13:55:51

You mean the acronym annoys you SubtleCheese?

How about in 'spag-bol'?

NoSquirrels Thu 05-Oct-17 13:56:24

Ah, I must admit that hadn't registered as an annoyance with me.

But ... YANBU to be annoyed by misuse of language.

PenelopeStoppit Thu 05-Oct-17 14:06:44

I dislike say being used in a similar way OP... I am thinking of taking a holiday, somewhere warm, say Sardinia.

teaandtoast Thu 05-Oct-17 14:54:29

Surely it's the imperative?

And say is just an abbreviation of let's say?

existentialmoment Thu 05-Oct-17 15:20:07

It's just completely superfluous. Take the word think out and both examples make perfect sense.
And I feel (irrationally, I'm sure) somewhat pissed off at being told what to think. No, you explain yourself clearly and I'll just follow along....

peachgreen Thu 05-Oct-17 15:54:13

I often see it being used to indicate that the example/s given aren't exactly accurate (so as not to be outing). So something like "My friend is really in to a particular brand of handbags (think Mulberry, Chloe, Fendi)..."

It's useful in that context, I think, but I agree that it's superfluous when it precedes specific examples as in your post.

FakePlasticTeaLeaves Thu 05-Oct-17 15:58:25

I don't like this either. People also seem to do it when explaining names, which makes no sense.

"My child has a very traditional name beginning with J, think John, Joseph, James."

mikeyssister Thu 05-Oct-17 17:10:59

What does SPAG mean?

Waffles80 Thu 05-Oct-17 17:45:50

You know, don't you, that linguistic change is perfectly normal? Presumably you don't mind that we we've moved on from, oh, I dunno, Chaucerian English?

Language isn't set in stone. It evolves constantly. People who find this boils their piss should find more important things to worry about.

existentialmoment Thu 05-Oct-17 17:48:12

You know, don't you, that linguistic change is perfectly normal

You know, don't you, that being irritated by linguistic change is also perfectly normal?

And while of course language evolves, we do not have to accept every torturous mangling of our language by any given person as somehow new canon, just because they used it?

blackteasplease Thu 05-Oct-17 17:54:43

I think I find it annoying because it is the imperative - i.e. telling me what to do! However I am easily annoyed!

Fucky Thu 05-Oct-17 18:01:16

You lost me at reflexive pronoun

beCreativeInitiate Sat 07-Oct-17 04:52:38

@mikeyssister

SPAG = spelling, punctuation and grammar.

@Waffles80

I find the evolving of language absolutely fascinating (MSc in the subject) and I realise that it does so.

I find it funny you think I need something "more important" to worry about yet two posts of yours I remember were 'recommend me a hair dryer' and 'what shoes to match a dress for a wedding'. confused

@Funky - pronouns where the subject and object and the same; myself, ourselves, himself etc.

Correct: I can see myself in the mirror.

Incorrect: I'm fine thanks. What about yourself?
He asked William and myself to do it.
I directed all inquiries to myself.

ieatmydinner Sat 07-Oct-17 05:22:47

YABU

Pengggwn Sat 07-Oct-17 05:26:46

It irritates me because it's always blindingly obvious what the person means: 'I have an excellent degree from a top U.K. institution (think Oxford, Cambridge, etc.).

Erm. hmm

Waffles80 Sat 07-Oct-17 22:51:37

I doubt my memory is as good as yours be (that, and I can't be arsed to advance search wink) but I doubt I was "irrationally annoyed...grrrr!" about a hairdryer or shoes.

mikeyssister Sat 07-Oct-17 23:11:46

Thank you

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