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To ask a doctor to do this?

(47 Posts)
CottonEyedJoe Fri 22-Sep-17 19:46:22

I have a large lump on my neck. I'm really self conscious about it. My doctor said I'd have to go private to have it removed - costs at least £200. Im a young single working student mum living in an expensive area, and can't afford this.

There is a doctor at the medical centre I work at that runs a minor ops clinic and can remove it- often does. I know it's possible to be added as a temp patient so he could do it for me.

But is it really cheeky to ask him? I've only worked there a few months. My colleagues say to do it, but I can't pluck up the courage so am leaving it in the hands of the AIBU vipers grin

Gingernaut Fri 22-Sep-17 19:52:35

It wouldn't hurt to ask him informally first.

Slartybartfast Fri 22-Sep-17 19:53:59

oh yes, go for it, got to have some perks of yoru job
how long have you been there though?

bimbobaggins Fri 22-Sep-17 19:55:45

Of course you can ask, the worst that can happen is they say no. Although I think some places may have no treating staff rules but I would definitely ask.

BenLui Fri 22-Sep-17 19:55:47

Ask him politely and if he says no accept the response graciously.

PatMullins Fri 22-Sep-17 19:57:24

Definitely worth asking. I run blood tests for everyone at work all the time

vestedintern Fri 22-Sep-17 19:59:09

I know my local private dentist does deals for staff to have orthodontic treatment, so I don't see why this should be any different - certainly not so obviously beyond the pale that you can't reasonably ask about it.

To be honest 200 quid is a minuscule amount of money for any kind of private medical treatment, so it must be a really quick/simple procedure.

Wheresmytaco Fri 22-Sep-17 19:59:24

I wouldn't ask. I'd get someone else to ask.

Or I'd just bring it up casually (if you can?) that you're saving up to pay for a removal.. did he know about costs etc... see if he offers.

WrittenandGrown Fri 22-Sep-17 20:00:40

I am certain you can get it done and I don't think it's cheeky at all. All the best for the procedure.

stopfuckingshoutingatme Fri 22-Sep-17 20:01:15

I had one on my back was same as you
Then it got smelly and another GP referred me
Took half an hour
In italy they wouldn't think twice or in France
Ask ! You pay your taxes and many U.K. GP would take it off

KurriKurri Fri 22-Sep-17 20:01:42

Do you know what the lump is ?
I had a lump removed from my neck about a year ago, on the NHS by a plastic surgeon - it was a cyst. I would tell your doctor that it hurts and you would like a referral to a plastic surgeon.

Failing that I would ask your colleague what he would do in your circumstances - he might offer to remove it for you.

balsamicbarbara Fri 22-Sep-17 20:02:16

GPs do this sort of thing now. But yes ask because this is a key perk of working in medicine along with getting quick referrals

bimbobaggins Fri 22-Sep-17 20:04:49

Wheresmy, why wouldn't you just ask yourself instead of getting someone else to ask? How childish

HicDraconis Fri 22-Sep-17 20:04:50

Depends on how large, where on the neck and what it is.

Sebaceous cyst, small superficial lipoma - easy enough with some local, an elliptical incision and a suture - I would ask.

Anything larger and I wouldn't. There are risks depending on where in the neck it is, you may end up with them being unable to close the incision and needing a flap repair, it may be unexpectedly deeper than it looks. The doctor may feel obliged to say yes even if they are uncertain because of the potential to create bad feeling ("it's only a lump, I don't know why he won't take it off for you" type comments). It puts them in a difficult position.

I have seen many lumps prove to be more tricky than first glance and I've had to look after patients sent in from the community when the GP doing the minor op found themselves half way through something larger than they anticipated which they were unable to finish. We do most of our neck lumps under general anaesthetic.

CottonEyedJoe Fri 22-Sep-17 20:06:12

Or I'd just bring it up casually (if you can?) that you're saving up to pay for a removal.. did he know about costs etc... see if he offers.

This is a brilliant idea! I wasn't sure how to start the conversation blush at lunch one day I'll just say 'Oh Dr ** I've been meaning to ask you. I went to my doctors about this lump on my neck and he said it'd cost over £200 to remove. Can you recommend anywhere private that might be a little cheaper as life is so expensive now I'm back at uni and the little one's back at nursery all the time'
Do you think that'd be ok?

Yay! I'll try to pluck up to courage to ask on Monday. Would be so so happy if he said yes. I know another staff member got her mum in so he could remove a mole for her. But she's been there about fifty million years. Anyway I'll just hint and hope for the best.

And if he says yeah I'll have to grit my teeth and put my big girl pants on for the procedure as I'm massively needle phobic and I can't embarrass myself if he's so kind as to do it blush

bimbobaggins Fri 22-Sep-17 20:11:18

No I don't think that would be ok, don't beat around the bush hinting. Just ask
He can only reply Yes or no what's so bad about that.just be assertive. I don't understand what's so difficult about it

CottonEyedJoe Fri 22-Sep-17 20:12:11

It is a lipoma. Please see attached pic @HicDraconis and let me know what you think.

Sorry for gross photo envy <definitely not envy>

Chewbecca Fri 22-Sep-17 20:12:37

Why not?

CottonEyedJoe Fri 22-Sep-17 20:14:17

*No I don't think that would be ok, don't beat around the bush hinting. Just ask
He can only reply Yes or no what's so bad about that.just be assertive. I don't understand what's so difficult about it*

Thanks bimbo. I have pretty severe GAD so most conversations that are out of the ordinary are pretty difficult for me.

DeadGood Fri 22-Sep-17 20:14:42

'Oh Dr ** I've been meaning to ask you. I went to my doctors about this lump on my neck and he said it'd cost over £200 to remove. Can you recommend anywhere private that might be a little cheaper as life is so expensive now I'm back at uni and the little one's back at nursery all the time'

Hmm. Laying it on a bit thick OP, it could rub this person up the wrong way. People generally prefer others to be be more straightforward.

I'm sure someone can think of a good icebreaker to get the conversation going, but don't be coy about it. Good luck!

CottonEyedJoe Fri 22-Sep-17 20:15:28

I couldn't get all of that out tbh 😂 an icebreaker would definitely be better. He is very nice and kind but we haven't spoken much.

HicDraconis Fri 22-Sep-17 20:16:23

That is not a large lump. It's tiny. I could take it off for you and I haven't done a lumps and bumps list for 20 years!

I was imagining some huge lymph node type swelling 😂

Agree I wouldn't hint and hope though. I'd say something along the lines of "this lump on my neck really bothers me, would you be able to take it off at the end of the morning / afternoon?" and bring in a decent bottle of wine as a thanks.

Ididnthearanything Fri 22-Sep-17 20:17:36

Just ask and explain. He will likely be delighted to help you out

DeadGood Fri 22-Sep-17 20:18:20

Just seen your update, I can see how it could be tough to ask (how to find the words can be tough sometimes) but I don't think the person would be put out to be asked.

Hope you get sone good ideas on here soon! Maybe you could simply open how you planned to - how you've had it looked at and quoted - then ask "is this a procedure you could perform?"

Then you leave it open for the doctor to say "yes, I'll do it no problem" or "yes, it'll cost XYZ" or "sorry, not really my area"

SingaSong12 Fri 22-Sep-17 20:18:32

If you are working for an NHS GP it might put them in a difficult position as they may not want to say no. However temporary patients are only meant to receive emergency treatment, which doesn't cover your procedure.

Details of that type of treatment will be passed to your own GP. A particular difficulty might come if there are any complications. The NHS would be responsible for providing care and that would fall on your current GP practice who told you you had to go private. (Whereas any non emergency complications after private surgery must be dealt with through private treatment.)

www.nhs.uk/chq/pages/2572.aspx

www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/how-can-i-see-a-gp-if-im-away-from-home.aspx

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