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NHS Hospitals hit by massive cyber attack

(119 Posts)
user1491572121 Fri 12-May-17 15:51:26

www.theguardian.com/society/2017/may/12/hospitals-across-england-hit-by-large-scale-cyber-attack?CMP=fb_gu

LadyPW Fri 12-May-17 15:52:10

And your question......

user1491572121 Fri 12-May-17 15:52:15

This is terrible! shock Who would do such a thing? Is it something sinister?

watchoutformybutt Fri 12-May-17 15:59:35

Well yes it seems sinister to try to disable the NHS confused it's not just banter is it..

user1491572121 Fri 12-May-17 16:00:33

What I mean is...could it be some kid sat in his Mum's spare room? Or is it more likely to be a sort of terrorism?

wolver1ne Fri 12-May-17 16:02:17

This sort of thing could easily lead to patient deaths. Many hospitals are moving towards paperless systems including for administering drugs / generating prescriptions.

AnathemaPulsifer Fri 12-May-17 16:02:42

There have been loads of demands for money. Apparently some US hospitals have been hit and paid up because with e-records they have no way to replace the data. It's not kids.

user1491572121 Fri 12-May-17 16:04:11

Anathema they paid?? shock My God. You'd think some genius computer person or people would volunteer to sort it all out for free! Is this kind of thing sortable??

MrsTerryPratchett Fri 12-May-17 16:04:15

Demands for money rather suggests deliberate attempt to rob.

You'd have to be an utter sociopath.

TheNaze73 Fri 12-May-17 16:05:20

Local authorities have paid in a similar fashion as well.

Sick fucks doing it to hospitals though

Anon213 Fri 12-May-17 16:05:55

The demand for money could easily be cover for something more sinister.

user1491572121 Fri 12-May-17 16:06:52

It seems to be confined to the North East mainly...

TheFrenchLieutenantsMonkey Fri 12-May-17 16:10:08

I was in an Urgent Care centre (in the North East) last night and this happened to my daughter. They couldn't check her XRays as they were lost on the system. They were working their best to get around it. They apologised so much I really felt for them.

MrsTerryPratchett Fri 12-May-17 16:12:36

Computer Engineer DH says that the easiest way to do this is 'social engineering'. Me: tbusmile

It's when you make a person either show you the password or allow you access.

Or a bash bunny. Whatever that is...

FanDabbyFloozy Fri 12-May-17 16:13:21

It's the world we live in, and bear in mind that the NHS have paid millions for their IT contracts.

Hence why I don't allow any weak security device into my house - CCTV, Alexa, wireless speakers. Unless I can get a version that runs on a closed network, I am not interested.

CurbsideProphet Fri 12-May-17 16:14:59

It's hit the NW too. DP works in the NHS and it's a nightmare for him.

user1491572121 Fri 12-May-17 16:15:18

MrsPratchett...how do they make someone show their password?

MiaowTheCat Fri 12-May-17 16:17:00

MrsPratchett...how do they make someone show their password?

There's stuff online about how things tend to work - but it's like getting the info from someone that means you can pull off a password reset (thinking about the standard type of questions they tend to get) then once you get into something like their web-mail account you can unpick and take hold of more and more stuff that way. I read an article on it I'll see if I can find

MrsTerryPratchett Fri 12-May-17 16:18:12

You call, pretend you're from IT, ask someone to do something, "that's not working can you screenshot?. Some people don't hide their passwords, some people will say their passwords...

MrsTerryPratchett Fri 12-May-17 16:18:46

People tend to be the weak link in the system.

AnathemaPulsifer Fri 12-May-17 16:19:38

fortune.com/2016/03/29/hackers-medstar-cyber-attack/

Foureyesarebetterthantwo Fri 12-May-17 16:22:15

For some reason the NHS or rather GPs in particular hate printing stuff out if you ask for it. I've had to insist that we have copies of blood test results (as everyone is entitled to see data held about themselves under the Data Protection Act) and have been refused until I put my foot down.

This was more so that we can see what's going on, but I guess it could be extremely handy to have your results and diagnoses held on paper by you (not your entire note system as I don't think that's needed).

AnathemaPulsifer Fri 12-May-17 16:22:19

Agreed MrsT, a friend who works in network security reckons the password reset is the weakest link. I use the option that requires approval from my phone whenever it's an option - phone is harder to steal as always glued to my hand

noblegiraffe Fri 12-May-17 16:23:32

How hackers work in real life

MiaowTheCat Fri 12-May-17 16:27:47

There is the wisecrack doing the rounds on twitter that they've reverted to pen and paper as a GP's handwriting is the most secure form of encryption possible.

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