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To be fuming at this restaurant?

(774 Posts)
Ginge85 Wed 12-Apr-17 15:40:11

I recently went to a restaurant with my best friend and DS who is 14 months old for lunch. We'd never been before. When I asked for a highchair for DS they promptly brought us one and I'd never ever thought this restaurant would be not a child friendly place.
My friend and I ordered drinks and our food and shortly afterwards I started to feed DS a smallish pot of pasta I'd made and brought with us. There was nothing really on the menu I would've ordered for him, and anything I could've done he would've barely eaten any and would've been a waste of money. I was then therefore extremely baffled and shocked when the waitor came over and awkwardly told us that any food that wasn't bought in the restaurant couldn't be consumed there confused. He was talking about DS's pasta. I could understand if we as adults had brought our own food and we're eating it but for a baby?! Our bill would've come to around £35 with what we'd ordered also. He was very persistent with this and in the end we walked out before our food had come (we didn't pay for our drinks- but hadn't drank from that as yet). I'm baffled and fuming! Any other time I've been out for lunch every other restaurant has never ever said anything, and have been more than happy to get me a bowl of hot water to warm it up if needed. AIBU?

Yukbuck Wed 12-Apr-17 15:43:21

Is this a joke? Or a reverse? You didn't pay for your drunks and got annoyed when they told you you couldn't bring your own food in? Why not order a pasta dish or something and give DS some of yours?

WayfaringStranger Wed 12-Apr-17 15:43:29

I think YABU to be fuming but otherwise, I see your point.

dementedpixie Wed 12-Apr-17 15:43:47

Lots of places specify you can't bring your own food. Could you not have given him food from your plate? He's not a tiny baby so could have handled most things

Whitelisbon Wed 12-Apr-17 15:44:20

It would never occur to me to take food into a restaurant, until the dc are big enough to want a meal for themselves I just let them have some of mine, most places are happy to provide a separate plate.

2ndSopranos Wed 12-Apr-17 15:44:57

YABU. At that age, you order something you think your dc might eat bits of even if it wouldn't be your first choice. Or order a bowl of veg, bread, anything picky.

user1492007682 Wed 12-Apr-17 15:45:49

Message deleted by MNHQ. Here's a link to our Talk Guidelines.

RainbowPastel Wed 12-Apr-17 15:46:14

Since when has it been acceptable to take your own food to a restaurant? I'm not surprised they told you off.

StillStayingClassySanDiego Wed 12-Apr-17 15:46:17

Sorry I'm not with you on this one, you hadn't been there before [they might have a reputation for being strict about such things] and at 14 months of age he could have had something from the menu.

YABU.

Trb17 Wed 12-Apr-17 15:46:42

YABU. It's a restaurant not a picnic area. You don't take your own food in. Surely this is a joke?

expatinscotland Wed 12-Apr-17 15:47:06

You didn't pay for your drinks and you left them with two covers that went to waste. And you shouldn't have brought your own food in there.

Dear gawd, you were rude.

YABU.

coolaschmoola Wed 12-Apr-17 15:47:35

YABU.

WritingHome Wed 12-Apr-17 15:47:48

It's perfectly normal where I am for people to bring small snacks for babies / very young children if they are ordering for themselves.

When dd was that young she may had tasted something from my plate but I would have had to feed her something I knew she would eat or she would have been less happy to sit and let us eat.

It's hardly the crime of the century....to feed a baby...

EatDessertFirst Wed 12-Apr-17 15:47:56

YABU. Kids menus are generally (with the two large pub chains I have worked for) designed for 1 year olds to 12 year olds. YWBU to bring your own food in when you could easily have ordered something off the menu for him (allergies withstanding obviously). And walking out without paying for drinks you ordered was just bad form. The waiter will probably have to pay for those himself.

EsmeeMerlin Wed 12-Apr-17 15:48:05

He is not a tiny baby, surely you could have ordered something for yourself that would have been suitable to give him a little of.

Most places would not have let you take food in unless for a small baby on perhaps purée food, even then it would be on the discretion of staff.

YABU to be fuming.

TheWitTank Wed 12-Apr-17 15:48:14

This is a general rule I find -why couldn't he have some food from your plate? No need to buy a whole meal. Or even a side dish or starter to top up any food from your plate? I do think it is quite rude to bring your own food to a resteraunt.

Pollydonia Wed 12-Apr-17 15:48:32

You alright User ? confused
Yabu, most places won't let you bring food in.

CognitiveIllusion Wed 12-Apr-17 15:48:37

This is standard practice in most restaurants. No food except what is bought on the premises.

Nairsmellsbad Wed 12-Apr-17 15:48:49

Pretty stupid on the part of the restaurant to prefer customers walking out (and presumably a wasted food order) rather than allowing a pot of pasta. I would have done the same - have never been in a restaurant where this was a problem. YANBU imo

HecateAntaia Wed 12-Apr-17 15:49:25

you could have asked them to make pasta for him.

yes i understand that margins are often tight and they probably have a policy on this as a result of people ordering a coffee then sitting for ages feeding their kids stuff theyve brought from home
and i do understand that
but maybe they could make their policy clear at the door to avoid such situations.

NannyR Wed 12-Apr-17 15:49:44

I think if you are feeding smaller babies purees it's ok to bring your own but when they are toddlers and you are giving them small portions of normal food then you should order something or ask for a plate and feed them from your plate. You could ask for a doggy bag and take home any uneaten food for lunch the next day.
Most menus have something that is suitable for toddlers and if you ask them, most restaurants are happy to make something "plainer" or in a smaller portion.

Iamtheresurrection Wed 12-Apr-17 15:50:25

I agree with the restaurant. I remember being in a cafe with my son which only had two high chairs in (my son was in one). Two women came in with toddlers created a massive fuss that there wasn't a high chair. I turned round to look and they were emptying a bag with marks and Spencer's sandwiches, snacks out onto the table for the children! One of them then went up to the counter and demanded my son be removed from his high chair as we'd had it long enough. That will be my son who was eating soup and a sandwich bought in the cafe.

Still gives me major rage thinking about it.

Trifleorbust Wed 12-Apr-17 15:50:45

What sort of restaurant was it? A cafe isn't a restaurant. You can't take your own food to most restaurants.

And I can't believe you refused to pay for the drinks!

Questioningeverything Wed 12-Apr-17 15:51:01

If you'd been talking about my lo (8months) I'd have been agreeing slightly. I'd have asked first though. But most places can do something simple off menu for a small child.

Took my lo to Nando's the other day. Gave him the bun from my burger and some plain chicken from my friends plate. Happy as Larry he was

Ginge85 Wed 12-Apr-17 15:51:28

Seriously? No not a joke or a reverse. Since the age of 6 months i have brought something for DS to eat if I know it's not the kind of place that does kids meals, and have NEVER had anyone say anything at all. As I say most restaurants are more than happy to help me heat it up! It's definitely not an unusual thing to do here whatsoever!

I left them with two covers as he pretty much told us to leave when we questioned it! I was not rude to him as much as I were confused and shocked

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