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To ask how people drive safely in places with no traffic lights?

(12 Posts)
hellokittymania Mon 03-Apr-17 06:58:19

I have been to India and other places where there are lights sometimes, but sometimes they are ignored. I was just watching are YouTube video on somebody who went to Bhutan. Among other interesting things, there are no traffic lights in all of Bhutan. So I am just wondering how people get around safely without crashing into each other all the time

Rainydayspending Mon 03-Apr-17 06:59:54

I am guessing it's either on signs road markings or shared spaces?

BertieBotts Mon 03-Apr-17 07:02:24

They don't, there are more crashes in these places.

But of course it's not literally crash after crash - I expect there is a vague custom of who you give way to and if you're expecting everyone else to be an aggressive driver then you're probably more alert too.

Meekonsandwich Mon 03-Apr-17 12:18:45

They did an experiment I a city somewhere where drivers had to share the road with pedestrians buses cyclists, there were no pavements, any body Could go anywhere. It was highly successful as the driver's were much more aware and alert.

Maybe its similar??

Applebite Mon 03-Apr-17 12:20:57

I've certainly heard that the traffic lights are switched off overnight at certain American junctions - and apparently the traffic flows much more smoothly.

araiwa Mon 03-Apr-17 12:21:08

by not being obnoxious twats on the road?

i would also imagine traffic density is far less in bhutan than most countries

Expatosaurus Mon 03-Apr-17 12:24:36

Apple some traffic lights are turned off at weekends and at times of the day that are considered to be not so busy. Then it reverts to the standard "anything from the right has priority" rule.

BarbaraofSeville Mon 03-Apr-17 12:27:56

Usually it only works in places with lower traffic densities. People simply look and make their own judgement on whether it is safe to go or not, just like we do in the UK on junctions without traffic lights, which is probably the majority anyway, outside major cities. Or there are more accidents, sometimes.

Traffic lights are often there to make sure everyone gets through, rather than queues buildling. If there is less traffic, there is more likely to be a gap to join a main road. It's only when the stream of traffic coming along the main road is relentless, that it needs to be stopped by traffic lights to allow people to join from minor roads.

I've holidayed in Gozo a few times, which is said to have only 5 sets of traffic lights on the whole island. It helps that the island is small, population density is low, and people aren't generally rushing around all over the place.

MrsLouisTomlinson Mon 03-Apr-17 12:31:14

Probably just use their common sense and drive with care. I hate this trend for traffic lights everywhere, what was wrong with being able to use a roundabout without bloody traffic lights on it to tell you when you're allowed to drive. Just give way to the right!

steppemum Mon 03-Apr-17 12:44:48

there was a busy junction near me when I lived in London. You always had to queue for at least one change of lights, as there was always a tail back in any direction. It was also a busy pedestrian crossing.

The traffice lights regularly broke. As soon as they broke, the traffice flowed more freely. Somehow everyone crept across the junction, looking in all directions, and got the other side safely, there were no accidents and contrary to expectations, the queues always disappeared.
I was disappointed every time they got fixed. And I did wonder if the breakdowns were not entirely accidental!

AnathemaPulsifer Mon 03-Apr-17 14:08:49

Some towns in the U.K. have roundabouts and hardly any traffic lights. Works fine. I've seen a lot of roundabouts in France too.

LurkingHusband Mon 03-Apr-17 14:20:09

They did an experiment I a city somewhere where drivers had to share the road with pedestrians buses cyclists, there were no pavements, any body Could go anywhere. It was highly successful as the driver's were much more aware and alert.

It's called shared spaces, and happens in the UK ...

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