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Day without a woman protest

(49 Posts)
Foxysoxy01 Fri 03-Mar-17 19:27:05

I have just read an article about A day without women protest on 8th march and am not entirely sure how I feel about it?!

I think it's great to celebrate women and everything we do day in and day out but wonder if not going into work or spending money anywhere that isn't owned by women is going to cause massive tensions and could it actually make tensions worse between SOME men and feminists.

Would it be unreasonable of me to send the template letter into my boss telling them why I won't be into work?

Would it be unreasonable of the men I work with to be unhappy that I didn't go into work and if they said they were having a male protest day they would likely be given a warning?

Am I unreasonable for even questioning it and should be thinking of women's rights history and that men are not entitled to a 'men's day' due to the fact they have never been discriminated against as women were/are?

Lastly will you be joining the Day without a woman?

TheSnowFairy Fri 03-Mar-17 19:40:51

Send the letter to your boss and do let us know how you get on...

Herdingcows Fri 03-Mar-17 19:45:14

Sounds like a load of old twaddle. What Is the protest trying to prove exactly??

Livelovebehappy Fri 03-Mar-17 19:46:09

Just another pointless, irrelevant protest that will achieve absolutely nothing.

raffleswinch Fri 03-Mar-17 19:48:39

Not a thing.

Prawnofthepatriarchy Fri 03-Mar-17 19:48:41

It's an American thing. Here's some info. It's connected to the Women's March on Washington.

Grilledaubergines Fri 03-Mar-17 19:51:22

Oh for goodness sake. What tosh.

I'm equal to a man and will turn up for work alongside my male colleagues.

This 'protest' is not doing any good, benefits no-one and does more harm.

WaegukSaram Fri 03-Mar-17 19:51:41

I like the idea of it but it's not very realistic. And it really highlights a gap in privilege. The women who are the most marginalised - in lower paid jobs - won't be able to afford to take a day off, and their bosses won't exactly be sympathetic to the cause.

Foxysoxy01 Fri 03-Mar-17 19:52:34

I don't really want to link to It but you can find an article about it on buzzfeed which is where I found out about it.

From what I gather it's been made up by the women rights group that started the women against Trump march. They have a letter that you can print off and give to your boss.

It sounds like the 'rules' are to do no paid or unpaid work and to not spend any money anywhere other than businesses owned by women or minorities.

They say it is to show how much women do and how much they contribute to society.

Prawnofthepatriarchy Fri 03-Mar-17 19:53:15

The Women's March on Washington was, on paper, a pointless shambles of conflicting claims and interests. In the flesh, however, it displayed heartening female solidarity. I couldn't see the point of the British spin off. Trump isn't our President. I don't think a British version of this is on the cards. If there is they need publicity.

Natsku Fri 03-Mar-17 19:56:14

It worked well in Iceland...

I won't be joining in though, because I feel like where I live (Finland) women are appreciated and have fairly good equality. It could be improved of course but its not a priority for me right now, though that does make me wonder if I'm letting the side down, but as I don't have a job I doubt I'd make much difference anyway.

VestalVirgin Fri 03-Mar-17 19:57:50

I think it's great to celebrate women and everything we do day in and day out but wonder if not going into work or spending money anywhere that isn't owned by women is going to cause massive tensions and could it actually make tensions worse between SOME men and feminists

SOME men already hate feminists (and frankly, those hold all women in contempt, they just don't admit it), I fail to see how anything could get worse therre.

It is a strike. You know what strikes are good for, right?

Of course men aren't going to be happy. That is the point of it.

With regard to the think Prawn linked to, I think it is a bit too wishywashy.
I believe strikes are more useful if you have a clearly defined change you demand.

Didn't the Irish women threaten to do something like this if they don't get the right to have abortions?
That's a good idea and I would participate.

I am probably not going to work or shop on the 8th anyway. But thanks for reminding me, I will make sure I don't accidentally do my weekly shopping on that day.

ArchNotImpudent Fri 03-Mar-17 20:00:51

What planet do they live on if they think women can just not turn up to work on any given day?

Foxysoxy01 Fri 03-Mar-17 20:03:09

Vestal

And will you wear red?

VestalVirgin Fri 03-Mar-17 20:04:46

I like the idea of it but it's not very realistic. And it really highlights a gap in privilege. The women who are the most marginalised - in lower paid jobs - won't be able to afford to take a day off, and their bosses won't exactly be sympathetic to the cause.

True. This needs way better organisation, so that the women who lose their jobs over it are compensated.

In Iceland, this was easier because it is such a small country.

But worldwide ... I fear it won't work, because there will always be too many women who lack any solidarity, who believe it is good enough that they as individuals feel equal to any man. hmm

Foxysoxy01 Fri 03-Mar-17 20:07:50

I can't imagine it will go down terribly well taking a day off work Which I suppose is the point but as a poster said earlier women are equal to men (or should be) and as such would missing a day of work while your male colleagues are working really be proving a positive point?

VestalVirgin Fri 03-Mar-17 20:17:31

Which I suppose is the point but as a poster said earlier women are equal to men (or should be) and as such would missing a day of work while your male colleagues are working really be proving a positive point?

Yes. It will prove that they need women. That is the point.

There is no need to prove that women are nice and kind or willing to let men walk all over us - there already is plenty proof of that.

What we need to prove is 1) they need us, and 2) we are willing to withdraw our work.

Make up your mind - should women be equal (then we have to do something to achieve that) or are you happy with the state of the world as is, and consider that equality?
If the latter, you don't need to do anything on women's day.

RebelRogue Fri 03-Mar-17 20:19:03

I like the idea and sentiment about it. It's just not practical or works less in real life. I wouldn't dare do it,and tbh my place of work would completely shut down as the staff is 98% female.

allegretto Fri 03-Mar-17 20:20:38

I won't be striking as I can't afford to lose a day's pay.

cathf Fri 03-Mar-17 21:31:37

Has anyone said we don't need women? Or are you protesting for an issue that doesn't really exist?

ArchNotImpudent Fri 03-Mar-17 23:20:22

The more I think about this idea, the more it seems badly thought out. The only women who will realistically be able to take part are:

1. Women in very senior positions who have a great deal of autonomy
2. Women who are not reliant on the income from their job to survive

The women in 1. are surely adding more by their presence and example of a woman in (say) an executive role, than they would be by their absence for this strike.

The women in 2. are probably those who have to fight as it is to be taken seriously at work - for instance, those who have put their career on a backburner while they do the lion's share of childcare - and the last thing they would need is to take time off for something like this (in addition to probably being the one who has to take time off whenever the children are sick, risking being seen as flakey by colleagues). Yes, women in 2. could 'afford' to lose their job in a financial sense, but it would be career-damaging.

If you're reliant on your job as household breadwinner, and you're not in a power-wielding position, there's no way you could take part in this. Some could simply not afford to lose the pay. I could afford to lose a day's pay - but if I have an 'AWOL' on my HR record (which is what this would be) - well, I could kiss goodbye to any promotion prospects in the foreseeable future - thus, I become one more woman stuck in middle management.

I recognise that the sentiment behind this is good, but I honestly think whoever thought it up must be living in a bubble, far away from the real world.

ILikeyourHairyHands Sat 04-Mar-17 00:56:02

I have a meeting on the 8th about the future of my daughter's education (she has additional needs), if all but one person turned up (six women, one man, all there to discuss the future of a girl), I would not be impressed.

ILikeyourHairyHands Sat 04-Mar-17 00:57:34

Sorry, if none, not all.

Spybot Sat 04-Mar-17 01:07:57

My children's school is closing due to this. (Am in USA) The students will suffer as there has been a lot of missed education this year because of bad weather and teacher illness. And now they miss another day so the school staff can participate in this. I am livid and have already written to the Board. There are so many kids there who need every single minute of help available. Disgraceful. And they're getting paid as they are taking it as PTO.

joystir59 Sat 04-Mar-17 01:11:29

8th March is International Women's Day- in many countries a public holiday- and that is something I would petition for in the UK!

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