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To be concerned about this? (Dog related)

(26 Posts)
Blinkybell Tue 21-Feb-17 20:49:20

A friend of mine owns some land - a large, field with a small wood, leading down to a creek. Field is fenced with a locked gate, no footpaths or rights of way. Friend allows close friends/family to walk their dogs off lead there.

My dog has pretty spot on recall, but he's getting a little less patient with other dogs - 99% of the time he is fine, but he's got a bit of arthritis and he gets a bit snappy when other dogs are allowed to jump on him and hassle him, so this is a great place to walk my dog - I can let him off his lead, he goes swimming in the creek, etc, etc.

Anyway, we're out walking in the field today when I see a couple with a young child climbing over the gate. Dog and I continued walked down to the creek where we were playing - throwing his ball, he was swimming and splashing around and generally having a lovely time when from behind me the couple appear and the woman tells me that my dog is scaring her son so I needed to leave. I called dog to me, put him on his lead and indicated that they could keep walking. Woman said no, I needed to leave as her son was scared of my dog. I said that the dog was now on the lead so he would be fine. Woman then said, no, her son wanted to play where we were and I had to leave. I asked them if they had permission to be there as I'd seen them climbing the gate (friend would have given them the code for the gate padlock). The man then stated that he 'had a genuine fear that the dog would attack' so was going to report me to the police.

Dismissed it at the time as I put the dog on his lead .

However, I've been worrying about it since. If they do report me, from what I understand the offence has happened if someone has 'reasonable apprehension' my dog will attack and it's my word against theirs

Oliversmumsarmy Tue 21-Feb-17 20:52:23

Weren't they trespassing

Pinkponiesrock Tue 21-Feb-17 20:52:55

Are you in Scotland or England/Wales ? Access rules are different in each location.

Cherrysoup Tue 21-Feb-17 20:53:53

Dog did nothing so nothing to report, plus you put him on the lead. If you see them again, tell them it's private property (no ROW?) and that they don't have permission to be there. Check with your friend first, obviously. Be firm, they sound like entitled twats. Their child wanted to play in the exact spot your dog as in?! Bloody ridiculous!

Cherrysoup Tue 21-Feb-17 20:54:13

*was

user1477282676 Tue 21-Feb-17 20:54:24

They were on private land without permission by the sound of it and what's more, your dog did nothing wrong.

They can't report you. You could report them for trespassing though.

Blinkybell Tue 21-Feb-17 20:55:43

We're in England. There is no rights of way through this field. There is in the next field, which leads down to a small nature reserve, but this little bit is private property

Pinkponiesrock Tue 21-Feb-17 20:55:57

However regardless of location unless your dog was actually acting aggressively, which from your post it doesn't sound like it, then they are more than a bit strange. Next time tell them that it's your land wink and if they don't like your perfectly under control Dog being there to go and walk somewhere else!

sleepwhenidie Tue 21-Feb-17 20:56:23

Please don't waste time worrying about this, they were trespassing, you had your dog under control, nothing happened and they have no evidence to the contrary. Imagine what they 'report'...equivalent to, we climbed over someone's fence into their garden and there was a person there with a scary looking dog. We told her our child was scared and she put the dog on the lead but refused to leave the garden'....bonkers!

Blinkybell Tue 21-Feb-17 20:56:56

I thought that the dangerous dogs act now applied to private property as well as in public

I know dog wasn't doing anything wrong, but it's their word against mine

Pinkponiesrock Tue 21-Feb-17 20:57:46

Well tell them to piss right off!
In Scotland the access rights permit people to use any unmotorised form of transport over private land, as long as they do so responsibly, without damaging crops, scaring livestock etc.

PrettyGoodLife Tue 21-Feb-17 20:58:07

How horrible for you! I think the fact that your dog had excellent recall and you immediately put him in a lead should mean that you gave no worries at all. For someone who appears to know the law it is a pity he did not know about trespass.

harderandharder2breathe Tue 21-Feb-17 21:00:32

They sound like twats

I hope you don't let idiots like that stop you and your dog enjoying your kind friend's land!

DoloresTheRunawayTrain Tue 21-Feb-17 21:01:55

They didn't have permission so tried to bluster their way out of it by threatening to report you to the police. Tell your friend about them and suggest he put a notice up saying guard dogs patrol the property (or however you word such notices without leaving yourself liable to court action). That should put them off.

piginboots Tue 21-Feb-17 21:07:15

Am I correct in thinking that your dog didn't even approach these people or their child?

It really doesn't sound like your have anything at all to worry about (and I'm quite jealous of what sounds like an idyllic dog walking spot (at least when the trespassers stay away!)).

Snoopysimaginaryfriend Tue 21-Feb-17 21:44:21

What are they actually going to report? They don't have your name or address and I'm guessing there is no CCTV. If they want to waste someone time taking a report that their lookout.

mineofuselessinformation Tue 21-Feb-17 21:51:13

So, to sum it up, they would need to provide evidence that your dog was dangerous (which they haven't got), AND be able to explain why they had chosen to trespass on private property whilst you were there with the permission of the owner.
'Entitled' and 'self-important' seem to sum the situation up.
I really do t tho k you will ever hear another word about it, so stop worrying.
Have a word with your friend about it (to confirm she has no idea who these arseholes are).
If you should see them there again, offer to phone the landowner to confirm that they have permission to be there (which of course they wont). Then tell them they need to leave before the police are called.

mineofuselessinformation Tue 21-Feb-17 21:52:06

Sorry for fat finger typos!

RainbowJack Tue 21-Feb-17 21:57:50

so was going to report me to the police.

You should have asked him what he was going to tell the police when they ask why he was trespassing in the first place.
The twat.

MiddleClassProblem Tue 21-Feb-17 22:03:16

Have you told the friend to see if she knows these people?

With the dog not actually doing anything, no one injured for proof etc, there's not much they would do I wouldn't have thought.

Wishiwasmoiradingle2017 Tue 21-Feb-17 22:06:19

Unless you had your name and address on a label on your coat what can they tell the police?

MsAdorabelleDearheartVonLipwig Tue 21-Feb-17 22:36:05

So they were trespassing and they decided that their precious child just had to be in the exact same spot that you already occupied and rudely went about attempting to evict you, and you're in the wrong? I don't think so. Cheeky twats. Please tell us you went back with your friend and she told them to piss off her land.

Blinkybell Tue 21-Feb-17 22:40:11

Thanks all

I live in a fairly small village and most people know friend/me/the dog so if they asked around they could, at a push find out who I am.

Dog didn't approach them at all. He was in the water waiting for me to throw his ball. Was most put out when I called him.

I've left friend a message to let her know

I've just been stewing on it a bit

Thanks!

Blinkybell Tue 21-Feb-17 22:41:01

The area we were is the only bit that's not over grown and you can get down to the water which I why I guess they wanted to be there too

innocentinfamy Tue 21-Feb-17 22:47:45

Horrible people. I'd have been tempted to bite them myself. It's not my dog you need to fear Pal grin

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