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Who picks up a guide dogs poop?

(30 Posts)
Pinkiepie1985 Sat 04-Feb-17 23:52:11

Genuine concern here... grandmother is regisrered partially sighted and getting worse. She qualifys for a guide dog... I'm sure the particulars would be explained to her should she decide to go ahead but... who picks up its poop if the owner cannot see?! Both out and about and within the home?

I do have genuine problems in life but this one has puzzled both our simple minds

empirerecordsrocked Sat 04-Feb-17 23:54:37

Guide dogs are trained to poo in the right place, they don't just poo in the street. Usually the garden or on demand somewhere the owner walks them at the same time each day.

CointreauVersial Sat 04-Feb-17 23:54:39

That's a very interesting question! I'm afraid I don't have the answer, though.

Girlwhowearsglasses Sat 04-Feb-17 23:59:23

They are taught to do 'busy' (wee) in drains but I can't remember what happens with poo. (Guide dog puppy foster home as a child)

Pinkiepie1985 Sun 05-Feb-17 00:02:30

Sorry for duplicate thread! Silly phone

TyneTeas Sun 05-Feb-17 00:08:19

I think that partners of assistance dogs are exempt if they are unable to scoop the poop

witwootoodleoo Sun 05-Feb-17 00:12:48

Legally guide dog owners don't have to pick up their dog's poo. However, Guide Dogs encourage owners to pick it up if they can. On training owners are taught how to do this without being able to see it. Essentially the dog only toilets on command and when it does you feel its back and from the curve can tell whether it is a wee or a poo. If a poo you point your foot towards the dog's bottom so when it is finished your foot is pointing towards the poo.

However, it's not viable for all owners to do so eg if the dog is caught short and uses a gutter on a busy road or if the owner has difficulty bending - hence the law smile

BishopBrennansArse Sun 05-Feb-17 00:14:27

Yep, they're exempt from the law.
However sight assistance dogs are as others said trained not to go whilst on duty.

IHaveBrilloHair Sun 05-Feb-17 00:14:29

I think the owner's are trained to know when the dog is pooing so can pick it up, also the dog's are trained to go at certain times.
Lots of blind people have some sight too so can see enough to scoop.

RacoonBandit Sun 05-Feb-17 00:19:50

My blind friend picks it up himself.

Guide dogs are trained to do busy (as pp said) at a specigic time like in the morning at home in the garden. However they do sometimes have to go.
My BF xan tell when his do need to go so he gets poo bag at the ready and uses his hand to guide his way down the dogs back while she poos so that when shes done he is in the right area. After the first grab he gets another poo bag and checks the area for stray poop.

I was once told off by a passer by for not helping my friend pick up his dogs poo. BF said "why should she its my dog, i dont change her kids shitty bums" grin

CarcerDun Sun 05-Feb-17 00:23:46

I worked once in an office with a guy who had a guide dog. The dog had its own toilet outside that he used. Fenced off and was cleaned by a.n.other.

JessaHanna Sun 05-Feb-17 01:38:16

This is enlightening.

But also infuriating - I live in an area where sighted some people don't clean up after their dogs.

Yet a registered blind person can in some cases. Amazing.

I love dogs. I love working dogs. I really do not like lazy owners who don't clean up after their dogs.

Good question OP smile

womblewomble Sun 05-Feb-17 02:23:32

Friend has a guide dog. They are trained to only go on demand which helps!

RacoonBandit Sun 05-Feb-17 02:26:25

That's not totally true.

They do sometimes just need to go and they do so. The owner does have to say the trigger word but no decent guide dog owner would ignore his dogs need for a poo.

RTKangaMummy Sun 05-Feb-17 02:39:11

We are guide dog puppy walkers

The puppy is trained to wee on BUSY command and poo on BUSY BUSY or BIG BUSY command

This they learn from 8 weeks and usually get to be under control with it from 14 weeks ish (iirc) we haven't done it for a while due to my DH ill health

Anyway the point being, that the puppy learns to do it on command at home in a specific area in garden, that is fenced off, before leaving the house and to hold on until returning home

They learn this by us getting so excited each time that they wee or poo on command

As in you take them outside to the spending area and as they squat to wee or poo and in the process, you say the words then straight afterwards you get soooooo excited that they realise that they have done something terrific in your eyes that they want to do it again the next time

This is done many times a day then they get to learn what to do when the command is given to then get huge amounts of cuddles and praise and an excited puppy walker

Obviously if they are out and about for a long time then the puppy will be trained to go after the command is given followed by lots of excitement and praise

The more time and energy that is put in at the beginning by the puppy walker the quicker it happens and also you have clean and dry puppies in the house with less accidents

Puppies give signals to show they want to go or you will know by their routine and so they wait until they are in suitable safe place

Our 5 year old ex guide dog puppy (who came back to us as a pet) knows that she gets to go to the park or beach or woods or wherever after she has done her busy and big busy in spending pen and so she never poos on a walk as she has done it at home beforehand

If we were out for a long time she still wouldn't just go she would signal that she wanted to and we would find a suitable safe place then give the big busy command that she would then poo

Think of pavlov and his dogs

So if a guide dog owner knew the routine of their dog they would want it to go at home before going out but if that wasn't possible the dog wouldn't just go on the footpath it would wait for the command so the guide dog owner was in control and be expecting it with the poo bag ready iyswim

RTKangaMummy Sun 05-Feb-17 02:46:12

The point I was trying to make is that guide dogs and puppies are still dogs but are well trained dogs they aren't robots

smilesmilesmile

NuffSaidSam Sun 05-Feb-17 03:04:48

If only you could train children like that!

Topseyt Sun 05-Feb-17 03:21:09

Guide dog owners do not have to pick up under the laws, though I know some do try to. The reason for the exemption is pretty clear really.

They are trained to go on command in suitable areas, though occasionally they can get caught short just like any other creature.

Phillipa12 Sun 05-Feb-17 03:35:54

I hope im not the only dog owner who if they saw a guide dog poo and its owner struggling to pick up would offer assistance, its not a pleasant job but only takes a few seconds.

NinjaLeprechaun Sun 05-Feb-17 03:41:14

"If only you could train children like that!"
You can. In fact, except that most people aren't going to use a 'command' word, isn't that how most people potty train their children?

I was once told "raise children, dogs and horses the same way" and it's always more or less worked for me. Although my daughter did think she was a dog until she was 4. grin

Feefeefs Sun 05-Feb-17 03:44:18

I'm o

FrancisCrawford Sun 05-Feb-17 07:50:53

If I meet my blind friend and his guide dog when I'm walking my dog and his dog does a poo I just say "I'll pick that up" because it's easier for me to do it.

I've seen the huge difference having a dog makes, in terms of confidence and social interaction and hope your grandmother decides to get a dog. It will enrich her life immensely.

showgirl Sun 05-Feb-17 08:00:14

They pick it up. I work with a visually impaired person who knows when the dog has pooed and then he just roots around on the floor till he finds ds the warm pile. It's not hard he just follows his nose.

Trainspotting1984 Sun 05-Feb-17 08:06:04

Guide dogs are amazing

FrancisCrawford Sun 05-Feb-17 08:22:53

I think OP is concerned because this is her grandmother, showgirl, who may not physically be able to safely bend over and root about in the same way as a younger person.

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