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AIBU to want posters to stop saying that someone 'is' ASD?

(271 Posts)
JigglyTuff Thu 19-Jan-17 09:06:09

It's not a taat because it's across multiple threads. Someone can have an ASD or have autism or even, if you must, be autistic. But no one is ASD.

Tippexy Thu 19-Jan-17 09:07:16

"If you must" be autistic? It's ok to say someone is asthmatic...

PlanIsNoPlan Thu 19-Jan-17 09:09:52

As the parent of a ds who has ASD, is autistic, etc, how it is phrased is really the least of my concerns in the grand scheme of things.

Is ASD irritates me because it's grammatically incorrect!

PolterGoose Thu 19-Jan-17 09:15:03

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

picklemepopcorn Thu 19-Jan-17 09:15:31

I think it may be because we were all so used to referring to 'aspies'. It had become an adjectival noun I think.

Person centred language can feel a bit clumsy in the mouth for everyday use, so people tend to take short cuts. Personally I try to use the terminology preferred by the person I am with. In my house we refer to 'being a bit spectrumy'. I bet that would make some people's hair curl, but it works for my family and helps people identify why they are uncomfortable with particular things.

Aeroflotgirl Thu 19-Jan-17 09:15:43

Or anything where someone is rude or aloof, oh they must have ASD. Or if somebody does not give eye contact, oh they must have ASD. It's so Annoying!

gamerchick Thu 19-Jan-17 09:16:01

As the parent of a ds who has ASD, is autistic, etc, how it is phrased is really the least of my concerns in the grand scheme of things

Yeah, I don't give a fuck either.

HelenaGWells Thu 19-Jan-17 09:17:19

Is asd is a grammar fail but as a pp said it is the least of our worries tbh. It does irritate me though as I am a fully paid up member of the grammar police.

Purplebluebird Thu 19-Jan-17 09:17:22

It's a bit the same as people saying (about me for example) that I am bipolar. No, I am not bipolar, I have bipolar disorder. But tbh it doesn't bother me. There are bigger issues with ASD (and bipolar disorder for that matter) than how it's phrased.

I don't do person centred for myself, but I'm not "autistic spectrum disorder" I either have ASD or I am autistic/an autist/an aspie...I'm not a disorder though.

spaghettithrower Thu 19-Jan-17 09:18:45

Irritates me when people diagnose themselves as "a bit ASD" or "a bit OCD".

Spikeyball Thu 19-Jan-17 09:19:59

'Is autistic spectrum disorder' doesn't make sense.
I dislike people referring to adults with severe learning difficulties as having sn. They don't. They have a disability.

PandasRock Thu 19-Jan-17 09:20:37

It's not one that bothers me, tbh. I have 3 dc. All of them are autistic (not 'have autism', although I wouldn't correct someone who described them that way, not 'being autistic'). Their autism is pervasive, and a part of who they are. So, in the way I would say my dd1 is right handed, I might say she is autistic. On a forum, typing on a phone, I have probably shortened this to dd1 is ASD for speed and ease.

<shrugs>

Each to their own.

HelenaGWells Thu 19-Jan-17 09:23:10

Or anything where someone is rude or aloof, oh they must have ASD. Or if somebody does not give eye contact, oh they must have ASD. It's so Annoying!

Yes to this. Some people are just rude, obnoxious, bloshy etc. I hate when people only ever pick out the negative things and say "oh they must have asd" no one ever says "hey they are super honest and loyal, they must have ASD"

PurpleDaisies Thu 19-Jan-17 09:23:13

There was a very similar thread in site stuff the other day...
www.mumsnet.com/Talk/site_stuff/2825263-MNHQ-please-dont-use-the-term-ASD-child

I agree, "he is ASD" is grammatically incorrect.

Bubblebathwater Thu 19-Jan-17 09:23:16

It doesn't bother me if I'm honest, I say I am autistic rather then I have autism. I never use asd apart from on mumsnet though, in real life I just say autism/autistic instead, apart from doctors i never really hear "ASD"

StUmbrageinSkelt Thu 19-Jan-17 09:24:03

A lot of people on the spectrum prefer that usage. They say they are autistic rather a person with autism.

I am happy to use whatever a person prefers. Person first language doesn't always feel right for some and I'd rather respect that than insist that they are wrong.

It's not about the non person first usage- it's about not being called a "disorder."

Bloopbleep Thu 19-Jan-17 09:30:54

if you must, autistic

Autistic is the preferred choice of the wider #actuallyautistic community. Autism isn't a disease people have and may prefer "is" because they see it as an identity instead of a disorder.

helpfulperson Thu 19-Jan-17 09:31:08

it's a grammar fail rather than about how someone is described isn't it. It is the same as someone is diabetic but has diabetes. my pet hate is talk of pin numbers. The numbers is just repeating the n of pin.

corythatwas Thu 19-Jan-17 09:33:27

It does sound like something out of a drama school audition: "Be the colour yellow". Except that here somebody is seemingly being asked to be a whole spectrum.

littlepeas Thu 19-Jan-17 09:34:24

In reference to my own ds, I would tend to say 'he is on the autistic spectrum', but he is extremely high functioning and I don't often have to say it (for now….) - I can imagine that using an easily understood abbreviation, even if it isn't grammatically correct, makes life simpler for others. I don't think anyone would be suggesting that ASD completely defines the person concerned (he is ASD), if that is what you are taking offence at?

What I do dislike is people saying 'oh, I'm a little bit ASD', or diagnosing someone else as autistic because they have one or two traits. Many many people have autistic traits without being autistic, myself included, it shouldn't be so casually bandied about by unqualified people (it is often done with OCD as well, also very annoying).

KayTee87 Thu 19-Jan-17 09:39:05

I dislike people referring to adults with severe learning difficulties as having sn. They don't. They have a disability.

My bil has special needs / is disabled. He doesn't like to be referred to as disabled as he thinks disabled people are in wheelchairs (doesn't understand there are lots of different types of disabilities) so we refer to his special needs instead of disabilities.

NotThrowAwayMyShot Thu 19-Jan-17 09:40:29

You know - when I'm typing on my phone, often with little time I just type whatever is quickest.
I still say dd is an aspie. It's how she describes herself. DS has an asd, probably not aspergers but maybe PDA & your You know what. I can't be bothered to type autistic spectrum disorder every time.

Life is hard enough when you have autistic children. Let's not nit pick about grammar.

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