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To be worried and disappointed DS has failed his mock year 6 SATs?

(69 Posts)
RocketQueenP Fri 13-Jan-17 16:21:10

So they have had mock SATs all week

The results came home with him today and I am mortified (obvs I have not conveyed this to him)

He is about 20% below the bare min pass mark for everything but reading where he got 70% hmm pass mark 55%

I will be having a chat with his teacher on Monday to find out what I can do and to find out if she is concerned / if I should be

I am pretty sure the SATs markds determine what "stream" or whatever they call it these days he will be when he goes to secondary after the summer sad

He is very bright, honestly, he just cant be arsed. He would rather have a laugh and can never be bothered with homework. He tricked me and his dad for months (we are not together) by saying to his dad he had done his home work at mine and vice versa hmm

He is also very good at football and excels in his school team and local team and he is absolutely convinced football will be his career. I do encourage him and am very proud of his achievements but also try and make him see that only the very very lucky few make lots of money from it

Anyway anyone else had similar or can re assure me please sad

SoFedUpOfPeople Fri 13-Jan-17 16:23:44

As far as I am aware, secondaries do their own tests. If he doesn't do as well as expected in the real sats, hopefully that might give him a kick?

Either way, with the results he has in his mocks, I would expect the school will put in place support and catch up lessons. It is as much, if not more, about them than it is about the student.

RocketQueenP Fri 13-Jan-17 16:26:13

The school has already been giving him extra maths support (him and some other kids who were behind)

that's good if the secondaries do their own tests. Fingers crossed.

I am seriously considering a private tutor. The frustrating thing is I KNOW he is bright!! KIDS aaaargh

SingToMeInFrench Fri 13-Jan-17 16:27:01

Secondaries will do their own tests. However their GCSE target grades will be based on their KS2 results

MatildaTheCat Fri 13-Jan-17 16:29:10

It a bit poor that school haven't communicated to you if he has been slipping behind or failing to hand in homework. Going in for a meeting to discuss catching up is a great plan. If he has missed some essential building blocks along the way he has to get these put in place before he will progress. DN is year 5 and has been placed in a special class for maths for the entire school year with a few other children and she has gained a huge amount.

I would suggest a clear plan which involves ds and possibly some tutoring and online learning as well. He has to want to do it. Remind him that footballers need a good knowledge of maths to deal with their riches smile.

I would also involve your ex and be extremely clear that no work =no football. Being in the bottom stream for maths isn't a bad thing but mucking around and skiving is and at this age really doesn't bode well unless he pulls his socks up right now.

YouTheCat Fri 13-Jan-17 16:29:35

Yes, secondaries do their own tests for streaming. I don't see the point in worrying about something that is purely a judgement on the school. You child will never, ever have to declare their SATS results on an application form.

Twistmeandturnme Fri 13-Jan-17 16:32:27

Last year about half of the children didn't get the required pass mark in maths and English.
The Y6 SAT is still new and the children haven't been trained from reception yet. Please don't worry.
The senior schools will CAT test them and make their own decisions.

Trifleorbust Fri 13-Jan-17 16:33:21

He tricked me and his dad for months (we are not together) by saying to his dad he had done his home work at mine and vice versa hmm

I don't mean to sound critical, but that means that neither you nor his dad looked at his homework for months. Do you think he might show more interest if you were able to spare a few minutes to review his work with him once a week or so? Children absolutely love to show off their work. It is also a quite negative message about how much work is valued that no-one actually checked it for months.

GreenGinger2 Fri 13-Jan-17 16:37:38

His year won't have had the full quota of time they are supposed to have had following the curriculum for these tests. Loads won't be at the stage they need to be yet. They sit the mocks so they can find out the gaps and fill them. Mocks also differ,some are harder than others.

I suspect they are trying to get as much support from parents in order to close those gaps. If you are worried find out the areas of concern and get some materials( CPG ). If he's bright and doing ok with literacy Spag is easy to bone up on. So that leaves maths and writing. Make sure he's lightening quick with tables,long division etc.

You don't need a tutor. School would be far better to work with than a tutor who may not even be familiar with the new curriculum.

RocketQueenP Fri 13-Jan-17 16:38:51

that means that neither you nor his dad looked at his homework for months

I agree me and his dad felt awful ...I have absolutely no excuse for that blush ...although I don't agree that all children like to show off their work, DS doesn't when he does any

I also agree its poor that the school don't communicate when they haven't done homework. When I challenged his teacher last term (when I found out about the no homework thing) she almost laughed it off, like oh kids haha. I mean really? Then she said that homework was "not compulsory" my response well it bloody should be

Trifleorbust Fri 13-Jan-17 16:40:50

When I challenged his teacher last term (when I found out about the no homework thing) she almost laughed it off, like oh kids haha. I mean really? Then she said that homework was "not compulsory" my response well it bloody should be

I agree, but how many parents do you get commenting on here saying the opposite? confused

At least you know now, it's your responsibility to make sure it's done. Good luck!

HighwayDragon1 Fri 13-Jan-17 16:41:08

Your dss says results will determine his predicted GCSE grades.

SandyY2K Fri 13-Jan-17 16:45:07

I would hope the school puts on booster classes for children who aren't meeting the grade , as it's in their best interest.

Even when he gets into secondary school, although he'll be put into ability sets after they do CATS, he still has the opportunity to move to higher sets if he's doing well.

Does he know how he's done? Does he feel upset or concerned at all?

You can go online and get some past SATS papers for him to practice at home and boost his confidence. I did that for my DC and one time, the paper my DD had practiced was the same one she did in her mocks the following day.

You can also find the answers online, so you can time him and mark the papers yourself. I found it a great help.

Sometimes it's also their speed in doing the test, as some kids struggle with that.

PM me if you're interested and can't find it. I'll ty and dig them up as it's been a while now.

RocketQueenP Fri 13-Jan-17 16:45:39

dss says results will determine his predicted GCSE grades

NO. WAY.

that's gotta be bollocks surely shock

RocketQueenP Fri 13-Jan-17 16:47:04

Thanks sandy

He knows the results. And he doesn't care. His teacher said he did brilliant (FML) so he is happy

MatildaTheCat Fri 13-Jan-17 16:47:37

Surely that's the next set of SATs?

MatildaTheCat Fri 13-Jan-17 16:48:54

Erm, 'the teacher said he did brilliantly,' I strongly suggest you ask her about this comment in the presence of ds to clarify that. hmm

Trifleorbust Fri 13-Jan-17 16:51:16

Yes, his SATS results will be used to predict his GCSE grades. Unfortunately, the Government decided to take away the discretion of secondary schools to set target grades. A child's expected progress is therefore based on their KS2 progress.

MsGameandWatch Fri 13-Jan-17 16:55:45

Yes, his SATS results will be used to predict his GCSE grades. Unfortunately, the Government decided to take away the discretion of secondary schools to set target grades. A child's expected progress is therefore based on their KS2 progress.

Ridiculous and utterly depressing in equal measure.

RocketQueenP Fri 13-Jan-17 16:56:24

Erm, 'the teacher said he did brilliantly,' I strongly suggest you ask her about this comment in the presence of ds to clarify that

I actually believe him TBH. After a distinctly underwhelming parents eve last year all she could say was how great he was and how "well" he was doing. But he is not. His results reflect that. I honestly think some teachers just say what they think we want to hear

Mrskeats Fri 13-Jan-17 16:56:43

I'm a teacher and tutor.
Firstly the tests have become more difficult and need practise.
You could get a tutor or you could work with him-you can buy practice books and there are plenty of sites where you can download free resources.
In year 7 some schools stream based on ability and some do their own tests and use info from them.
There is some correlation with GCSE results but obviously if he isn't trying hard then that's a bit meaningless anyway.
PM me if you want some links.

GreenGinger2 Fri 13-Jan-17 17:01:33

Don't do past papers. Check with school.They are for the old Sats. There is only one set for the new ie last year's and a sample set.I suspect school will want to save it/ them until nearer the time. It may also skew their results for him if he does it after at school ie they won't boost him in areas he needs to be boosted.

You can buy papers from publishers. I'd still check with school as if you do your own thing he won't be willing to do want they want on top.

Mrskeats Fri 13-Jan-17 17:03:30

The old papers help massively as they still cover lots of the same skills.
He won't be willing? How do we know that?

Mrskeats Fri 13-Jan-17 17:04:09

You can also access the spellings lists free online.

BreconBeBuggered Fri 13-Jan-17 17:05:30

Other than looking at last year's papers I wouldn't have thought there was much value in 'revising' from that perspective, as they're very different now compared to even two years ago. As for the GCSE grade predictor, I'm afraid that bit's true. Mindless, but true.
School will want him to pass so make sure you, school and his Dad are on the same page with what he's done and where he needs to address his weaker points.

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