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Dog pissing and shitting over everything. AIBU to PTS?

(213 Posts)
ImportSave Fri 18-Nov-16 11:56:18

I've just caught my dog pissing all over a fairly new side table. He stood and did it right in front of me, despite being less than two feet from access to the garden. I chased him out into the garden and cleaned it up,only to find he'd crapped in the kitchen without me knowing about it. I've shut him in the (tiled) kitchen, where he's howling and barking to be let out. He's ruined an expensive carpet through this.

Not to drip feed, he's about 17, a small crossbred who has free access to the outside and is walked daily. The vet has checked him several times and can find no physical reason this. I've also cleaned the carpet/furniture with enzyme cleaner, bio soap power and have had it professionally cleaned. My house stinks. I have a niece who will soon be crawling and I can't have her over if she's going to be crawling in dog urine (or worse, poo.)

I'm honestly thinking about having him PTS. I've owned him since he was a tiny pup and it would probably break my heart to do it, but I can't take much more of this mess either. I'm sitting here trying to get some very important work done and all I can smell is piss. All I can hear is him howling because he's been shut in the one room with a floor he can't ruin.

AIBU?

FayKorgasm Fri 18-Nov-16 11:59:14

Bring him to another vet for a second opinion. Trained dogs don't suddenly start toileting inside for no reason.

VivienneWestwoodsKnickers Fri 18-Nov-16 12:00:20

Are you saying he's incontinent rather than deliberately behaving in an unusual way? How's his health otherwise? Any changes in the household that could have stressed him out?

NavyandWhite Fri 18-Nov-16 12:01:10

Oh no how sad.

Don't let him howl. sad he doesn't mean to do it. What has your vet said about having him pts?
flowers

kilmuir Fri 18-Nov-16 12:01:48

You are mean to have shut him away. I would laugh if he starts to destroy stuff in there.
Get him to a vet and decide from there

NavyandWhite Fri 18-Nov-16 12:02:52

Erm hardly helpful kilmuir.

19lottie82 Fri 18-Nov-16 12:05:25

You need to get a second opinion re this....... if the vet says he can't find any medical issues (i.e. Not incontinence) then is it a behavioural one?

I don't think it would be fair to put the dog to sleep just because of this, no. You took the dog on so it's not right to PTS if he still has quality of life, just because he inconveniences you.

JellyBelli Fri 18-Nov-16 12:05:27

Have you actually house trained him? Does he know where he is supposed to do it?
Do you have a cat that comes in and pees on your stuff, and is he covering the scent of that?
If you dont want him any more then have him PTS yourself, he stands no chance at a shelter. You dont need permission to do that.

SissySpacekAteMyHamster Fri 18-Nov-16 12:07:48

I'd agree with getting a second opinion. He is very old and it could be that he's starting to fail.

I don't think you're mean to have put him in the kitchen at all and childish comments wishing for the OP's property to be damaged really aren't helpful.

Have to admit it isn't something I'd like to be dealing with. Keeping him in a room where he can't damage anything is probably your best option at the moment.

TheWitTank Fri 18-Nov-16 12:15:12

Definitely return to the vet. That isn't normal behaviour from a previously house trained dog, and he is elderly.
Can you put on dog nappies while you wait? They are used more frequently these days and are available at pet shops and online. Would save your carpets!

Mrsemcgregor Fri 18-Nov-16 12:17:43

Try nappies, I don't think a vet would pts an otherwise healthy dog with good quality of life?

LittleDittyAbout Fri 18-Nov-16 12:18:02

Lol at "have you house trained him?". Well OP? Has that never crossed your mind in 17 years??

Don't know the solution but at that age I would be leaning towards being PTS. They know they're not meant to, but can't help it.

LittleDittyAbout Fri 18-Nov-16 12:19:22

Dog nappies? Dear God I'd rather they pooed on the carpet.

ImportSave Fri 18-Nov-16 12:20:24

He's been seen by both vets at my practice who have done full bloods, a urine dip and a through physical exam. They can't find anything.

I could take him back but they've both basically said there's nothing wrong with him.

No other animals in the house and yes, he was properly housetrained though has never been fantastic at letting me know when he wants to go out. I had a doggie door built in so he has constant access outside when he wants it and he is still pissing in the house.

I haven't shut him in the kitchen to be unkind. I just want a house that is safe for the baby, and doesn't stink. I don't even want to invite friends round because I know that as soon as you step inside, it smells like a dirty loo, despite me cleaning the carpets and furniture weekly with enzyme cleaner and airing the house as much as I can. The carpet in the living room is less than a year old and is ruined. It has stains on it that I can't get out and just constantly stinks. The skirting board in the hall rotted where he was pissing on it overnight.

I don't know what else to do. sad

AnUtterIdiot Fri 18-Nov-16 12:22:34

I would take him back to the vet and find out if there's a medical cause.

Those of you who think that the OP is heartless to consider putting him to sleep - it's not. I had a seriously incontinent large dog with medical issues and for a good year we had a house that stank no matter how much it was cleaned, and a floor that couldn't be walked on in bare feet and which babies and children couldn't walk on. There are no words to describe how dreadful it was. Dog nappies do not adequately manage incontinence and since a dog won't tell you when it's messed you could find yourself suddenly standing in something that had been there for hours or even a couple of days.

We were able to resolve the issue by reducing the dog's medication in the end, but if that hadn't been an option I think we would have had to have her put to sleep.

AnUtterIdiot Fri 18-Nov-16 12:25:04

OP, would it be resolved by adopting a system of putting him in the garden every couple of hours, say? And having him sleep in the kitchen at night so that at least what he does is easily cleaned up?

insan1tyscartching Fri 18-Nov-16 12:25:57

It sounds like this is a longterm thing rather than old age from what you post if he never mastered letting you know when he needed out to toilet and the dog flap won't have helped with that. Can you get a behaviourist in and let them help you address things? It seems awful to pts a fit and healthy dog without at least giving him every possible chance to put things right.

trulybadlydeeply Fri 18-Nov-16 12:27:24

At his age dogs can get dementia, and this (just like in humans) can be a symptom. I think you need to see a different vet (another practice?) who can appreciate the severity of the symptoms and the distress it is causing you, and no doubt your dog too.

Foxyspook Fri 18-Nov-16 12:28:20

Do you think it could be the cold weather now and just feeling generally old and more pathetic about venturing out.

You could keep him in the kitchen and try newspaper by the dog in that case.

I think it would be reasonable to put a dog down for this at the age he is. But then I am probably in a minority on here.

TheWitTank Fri 18-Nov-16 12:28:44

I think you are going to have to restrict the rooms dog is allowed in for now. My two are not allowed upstairs at all -they have their own sofa (!) in the kitchen and all their home comforts, and the floor is tiled so any accidents are easily cleaned (although luckily they don't have any). I would take up the carpet. It's ruined -you will not get the smell out however much spray etc you use. You will probably find if you lift it, the pee will have soaked through to the underlay and therefore the smell lingers. Can you claim on your house insurance? Check your policy. Skirting will obviously need replacement too. Do you use child stair gates to block off access? Can be less stressful than being shut away. Cover floor with newspaper and puppy pads too. At 17, I sadly wouldn't imagine this situation is going to improve. Speak wity your vet again about options.

countrybump Fri 18-Nov-16 12:29:08

Forgetting house training is one of the symptoms of dog dementia. There are many other symptoms as well - does he have any of those?

Wileycoyote Fri 18-Nov-16 12:29:17

Personally I'd have him PTS.

Olympiathequeen Fri 18-Nov-16 12:29:33

Sounds crazy but I actually put a nappy on my old Yorkshire terrier. Obviously took it off regularly and put him in the garden to pee etc.

All your carpets need gone I'm afraid.

ToastDemon Fri 18-Nov-16 12:29:49

If his toilet training was previously fine, and it looks like a behavioural change rather than an accident/him not making it outdoors in time, then I would also think dementia given his age.

SleepFreeZone Fri 18-Nov-16 12:30:32

I couldn't put up with that but then I lived in a house that stank of dog piss while growing up and I have no tolerance for it. I would probably PTS and get no more pets afterwards.

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