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To ask if you agree with this statement?

(107 Posts)

MNHQ have commented on this thread.

AShadowLurkingInTheShadows Fri 24-Jun-16 16:46:06

I know, I know, I know... I'm just interested if you do and if so how old you are?

This is the last 'fuck you' from the baby boomers. They took the secure corporate and government jobs with the guaranteed pay rises and final salary pension schemes and benefitted from property they bought cheap and sold dear. They burnt the bridges behind them by colluding with the dismantling of the very things that had brought them prosperity. Their last act will be to burn the economy before they die"

I do and I'm in my early 20's

ApocalypseSlough Fri 24-Jun-16 16:47:42

Yes

OrangesandLemonsNow Fri 24-Jun-16 16:48:39

No. 40s

apatheticfallacy Fri 24-Jun-16 16:49:42

I agree they've screwed us over, I don't think it was intentional or malicious. Late 20s

UntilTheCowsComeHome Fri 24-Jun-16 16:50:45

I agree they've screwed us over, I don't think it was intentional or malicious.

^this. Mid 30s.

SootSprite Fri 24-Jun-16 16:52:45

Yeah, cos they're all sitting there cackling 'yeah, how can I screw over my children and grandchildren' ffs hmm

emilybrontescorset Fri 24-Jun-16 16:53:05

I'm not of the generation you describe but I have to disagree with you.

My mum lived with the fact that her mums eldest brother died fighting for this country, apparently his mother( my mums grandma) cried and cried uncontrollably. Her son was 19 years old . He had no choice but to fight so that future generations , whom have done nothing to help his family would be free. Nobody of your generation has to suffer that, compulsory conscription does not exist.

My grandmas family were poor, so poor that they had to work shifts down a mind so that they could all get a turn to sleep in a bed.

My Garda bought her council house. She had paid enough in rent over the years to have bought it several times over. She also received a state pension, after working away from home since the age of 14.
I know my mum voted out. She has every right to her opinion.

wowfudge Fri 24-Jun-16 16:53:27

I don't think they would see it like that, nor is it intentional or malicious, but I think it does boil down to pretty much that statement. 40s.

Junosmum Fri 24-Jun-16 16:54:53

No, I don't know any baby boomers who voted leave.

Hagothehills Fri 24-Jun-16 16:59:32

Mid 20s. Yep I agree. Though I don't think it was done maliciously I think it was done thoughtlessly. The generation that never grew up.

RoseDeGambrinus Fri 24-Jun-16 17:07:43

In effect, yes. In intention, no.

MrsTerryPratchett Fri 24-Jun-16 17:08:45

I agree they've screwed us over, I don't think it was intentional or malicious. In most cases with most things.

Except that my mum's road in leafy Surrey is full of older people in enormous houses with one or two people in them that they bought on one normal salary, working normal hours and raising kids.

They all fight tooth and nail except my parents thank goodness to prevent flats being build or any kind of new housing. Their kids and grandkids struggle and the boomer parents put it all down to hard work and immigration. It makes me so sad.

My grandparents worked hard in mills and mines and fought a war. My parents, in their 70s, didn't. They did normal jobs or were SAHPs and retired earlier than I will manage.

Bluebolt Fri 24-Jun-16 17:08:58

Most of that you have to blame the governments of the time with the right to buys and standing by whilst house prices rocketed and collecting stamp duty. The pensions when introduced where the perfect storm great on paper but with early morality equated out but the pensions remained unaltered as life expectancy increased and medicine improved creating the black hole we have now.

VenusOfWillendorf Fri 24-Jun-16 17:09:26

I agree with this: They took the secure corporate and government jobs with the guaranteed pay rises and final salary pension schemes and benefited from property they bought cheap and sold dear.
I believe this was deliberate, and done with a fuck you attitude.

I also agree with this: They burnt the bridges behind them by colluding with the dismantling of the very things that had brought them prosperity.
I don't think it was deliberate - I think it was stupidity. Not sure that makes it better or worse.
And now the young people are stuck with a screwed up economy. They have just had the right to right to work and live in 27 other countries taken away from them. Leaving the UK will involve dealing with quotas for work visa applications. In your position OP, I would be very angry.

40s.

LittleJeanDoddles Fri 24-Jun-16 17:09:37

I agree. Most baby boomers I know have voted leave, mainly for racist reasons, but also a number who think it would be exciting to see what happens. hmm
40s

kawolski Fri 24-Jun-16 17:11:58

I agree, but I believe it was unintentional (as above)

Late 20s very nearly 30s 😀

TempsPerdu Fri 24-Jun-16 17:15:40

Hmm... I hesitate to say yes to this, as I don't like all this divisive generational stuff, especially today. That said, this 'fuck you' outlook does absolutely typify my parents' views, those of their friends and those of my wider family who would fall into the 'Baby Boomer' category.

They're all what you'd call 'working class cockneys made good' - humble beginnings, made it into grammar school, left at 15 to work in decent jobs and now all comfortably retired on good pensions, mostly living in suburban N. London/Essex. My dad had private healthcare, a company car, Christmas bonuses and all the other 'perks' throughout his career (45 years in the same job before early retirement at 60). No university, but they didn't need it - although my Dad's old job would definitely require a degree today.

Yes, they did work hard, but no harder than me or DP or many other young people today. Yet they're unwilling to accept that the privileges they enjoyed (affordable housing, stable jobs and the like) are beyond the reach of many of today's young people. My parents were lecturing me just the other day about how my own generation and the next (I'm 35) are lazy, pampered and devoid of moral courage - we should all stop whinging, get off our collective arses and follow in their footsteps. They all hark back to a mythical, immigrant-free, 'ideal Britain' of the 1950s and voted for Brexit in an attempt to reinstate it. My Mum phoned at 9am to gloat over the Brexit vote (I'm a passionate Remainer) and to inform me she was off shopping at Brent Cross 'to spend your inheritance'.

I hope and believe that it's entirely possible the Baby Boomers I know aren't typical, but I do suspect that there's a largish subset of this group that (to use a phrase I usually hate) needs to 'check their privilege.'

TempsPerdu Fri 24-Jun-16 17:25:26

And YY to MrsTerryPratchett - the vaguest hint of potential house building in my parents's green, leafy area of N London has my parents and their neighbours writing letters, petitioning the council and organising themselves into Save Our Green Belt groups. And then they blame the housing shortage on the immigrants.

BackforGood Fri 24-Jun-16 17:39:28

No.
Ridiculous statement.

Oliviaerinpope Fri 24-Jun-16 17:48:46

Yes. I agree wholeheartedly.

VenusOfWillendorf Fri 24-Jun-16 17:57:45

Yeah, cos they're all sitting there cackling 'yeah, how can I screw over my children and grandchildren

I don't think the OP is suggesting that anyone set out to screw over their own child. Just about everyone would move heaven and earth for their own DC. But I do think most don't really care about other people's children (as in offspring over 18; most do look out for U18s I would like to think).

WilburIsSomePig Fri 24-Jun-16 18:00:52

I think it's a ridiculous statement. I'm almost 50 and voted for what I believe would give my children and potential grandchildren a more secure future. I think most people would. (FYI I voted remain).

mrsm43s Fri 24-Jun-16 18:08:22

I don't think it's malicious, and I don't think many of them even realise how privileged they have been,and how much harder they have made it for the younger generations, but broadly, yes, I agree.

Early/Mid 40s. I'm probably old enough to have escaped the worst of the pain, to have had many privileges myself such as free uni and lower house prices, but I do really worry for my children.

caroldecker Fri 24-Jun-16 18:13:15

On average over 40's voted out, so not just the retired.

WreckingBallsInsideMyHead Fri 24-Jun-16 18:17:14

Agree, I'm early 30s

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