Talk

Advanced search

AIBU to try and negotiate new salary?

(26 Posts)
p4rmaviolet Tue 16-Feb-16 08:32:58

Hi all,

I've recently been offered a new job with a salary of £28.5k based in central Manchester for a 36 hour week. Benefits include 30 days holiday and 10.5 additional bank/non stat days.

I currently earn just under £27k in a similar position in a more rural location for a 37.5 hour week. This is likely to increase to £29k-ish in April following a performance based review. I receive a 26 days holiday excl bank holidays.

Factoring in the additional travelling expenses I would incur getting to Manchester on a daily basis, either paying for city car parking or via public transport this is likely to cost me around £80 extra per month.

The role itself has a salary range of between £24k and £32k. They have taken into account my experience (4.5 years in quite a niche sector) and offered me £28.5k.

WIBU to try and push for a bit more, more towards £30k based on the above or would you say the additional benefits even it out a bit? I've never really done it before and I'm a bit scared that it would come across as rude.

Any help is greatly appreciated smile

DoreenLethal Tue 16-Feb-16 08:42:12

Yes of course 'I would need X to accept in order to take into account the increased travel expenses and the likely performance based review in April.'

Oysterbabe Tue 16-Feb-16 08:43:00

I've always asked for more money whenever I've been offered a job. Couldn't hurt.

DontCareHowIWantItNow Tue 16-Feb-16 08:49:09

By all means ask, however I would imagine that they will either say the extra benefits even it out, or that they may review it after any probation period.

ToffeeForEveryone Tue 16-Feb-16 08:49:35

If you don't ask you don't get. It's not rude and most employers expect, or at least are well used to, salary negotiations when taking on new staff. It's a lot easier to ask for what you think is a fair salary before you start rather than arguing for a promotion / raise within a short period.

Decide on the figure you want and think is reasonable (£30k? £32k?) and ask for that. You don't need to give lots of details to justify it, and I don't think your commuting costs are relevant (to the employer). Just say something like thank you very much for the job offer, you would love to accept however your salary expectation is £X based on your experience and reflecting the market rate for similar jobs. You could mention that you are in line for an increased salary shortly in your current role which is higher than their offer, which makes it difficult to accept at £28.5k.

Unless you are deliberately moving to a less stressful / responsible / more convenient role, don't take a new job for less money. The benefits are better, but presumably that's just the standard benefit package at the new employer, not a specially enhanced deal?

p4rmaviolet Tue 16-Feb-16 10:56:44

Thanks for your replies!

I was certainly going to mention my pay review to support my case.

I suppose if that's their figure, this could been been seen as a starting point for them
rather than the absolute final amout they are willing to pay. No harm in asking as you say!

You've all given me a bit more confidence with it anyhow 😊

Nottodaythankyouorever Tue 16-Feb-16 11:03:03

*I suppose if that's their figure, this could been been seen as a starting point for them
rather than the absolute final amout*

It maybe. It is the middle of the grade.

What I wouldn't do is ask for the top end of the scale. Be realistic.

Also don't mention your commute costs. It is of no concern to your employer.

p4rmaviolet Tue 16-Feb-16 11:27:43

Yeah, i'm under no illusions that I will succeed in getting the top end of the grade, I'd take an extra £1k on top to be honest.

I'll give it a go and let you know how I get on smile

Pollyputhtekettleon Tue 16-Feb-16 14:32:13

I'll be honest. I have a lot more respect for an interviewee who is clear about their salary expectations. If the range us up to £32k I'd be asking for that and making them justify why they couldn't give me the full amount. Their main reason you can be sure is that they simply want to get you as cheap as possible (4.5 yrs experience in niche area sounds very good in terms of experience level no?).

WineOrSleep Tue 16-Feb-16 14:38:59

I'm the same as you op, I think, (she says!) am about to be offered a job and need to negotiate an extra 5k over their advertised salary..... cr*pping myself, I'm a terrible sales / negotiator type person

Good luck!!!

Nottodaythankyouorever Tue 16-Feb-16 14:41:04

4.5 yrs experience in niche area sounds very good in terms of experience level no?

Depends in what the niche area is.

In my job it would be relatively good. In for example my DSis job, it wouldn't be.

Witchend Tue 16-Feb-16 15:19:38

I think it depends. I know dh's firm wouldn't go for negotiation, they also would laugh at the idea of 4.5years experience being good, that would be at the bottom end now. When dh started the did take new graduates, but now that's rare and they're looking for around 5years relevant experience.

They would have to specifically want you to negotiate and generally they're not in that position.

Alasalas Tue 16-Feb-16 15:29:20

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

gladyoucame Tue 16-Feb-16 15:41:18

I think they may have looked at your current salary (did you tell them) and offered you an increment on that so they could say it was more and would put them in a reasonable position. However the additional holidays are probably worth a decent amount, if you value them (I would as I have two children). It may be worth a polite conversation especially if you mention any relevant similar jobs however be prepared for them to say tough. Was the salary you would accept not discussed at any point during the process, e.g. You said when asked that you would be happy to accept the higher end. May be useful to ask about increase after successful completion of probation and when standard annual rises are considered.

JolseBaby Tue 16-Feb-16 15:49:19

Ask, ask, ask!!

You might not get it, but you should DEFINITELY ask otherwise you certainly won't get anything!

Thank you for your job offer. I am very interested in the position, but in order for me to seriously consider it there will need to be some movement on the salary. The remuneration for my current role is about to increase to £29K p.a., therefore I would be looking for an increase to £31K, to reflect the additional responsibilities and travel involved. I look forward to hearing from you. Yours sincerely, OP.

Do it. I didn't negotiate my salary in my last job and consequently found out that I was being pad £15K less than the rest of my team! I negotiated quite hard in my current job and got a good pay bump. It's very difficult to get a really meaningful salary increase once you are in a job, unless you secure a good promotion and your firm is prepared to play ball. So it's important that you make the most of moving jobs, as that's what gets your 'market value' up.

JolseBaby Tue 16-Feb-16 15:50:26

Alas - I specifically mentioned the travelling involved in my current role and got an increase of £3K for it. It depends on the role and how badly they want you.

SnakesandKnives Tue 16-Feb-16 15:52:24

Do remember that recruiting a new person is both expensive and time consuming. Once a company has found someone they are happy to offer a job to they really don't want to keep looking unless they have to.

You should definitely go back with a response as outlined by Toffeeforeveryone.

HRs job is to get the right employee for as little cost as possible to the company. They do NOT have your individual best interests at heart....but also shouldn't be emotionally attached to this either. It will (should) be expected that you will try and negotiate.

If it's a smallish company whose attitude is 'up yours take it or leave it, we don't negotiate on principal' or similar you may want to seriously consider if you really do want to work for them as other internal attitudes may be similar.....and don't usually lead to an enjoyable place to work!

Aberchips Tue 16-Feb-16 16:02:47

You can ask - but you may not get it!! Don't let that put you off. I work in HR & read a lot of articles about how men are much less hesitant about asking for more money/stating why they are worth more & what their strengths are & that women should be taking a leaf out of their book rather than just "settling" for what they are offered.

I woul personally go back to them & mention that you would be expecting a increase to around £29k in your next salary review for your current job & ask them to at least match that. Is the new role more work/ responsibilty? Then I think you could safely justify £30k.

In my experience if you can put together a few good points about why you think you are worth more, then people are more willing to give it to you...

Good luck!

Alasalas Tue 16-Feb-16 16:04:57

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

DrDreReturns Tue 16-Feb-16 16:15:00

Do you work in an area where there is a shortage of skilled staff? If so you should stand a good chance of getting more money.

witsender Tue 16-Feb-16 17:31:32

I once got offered a hefty car allowance when I mentioned that the leaving my current job would mean losing my car. Can't hurt hey!

MrBensMrs Tue 16-Feb-16 17:37:14

Always always ask!
I have worked in public and private sector and if you don't ask you don't get! If you're worth the extra few k (which is nothing to many companies) they'll pay it rather than go through the hassle of potentially unsuccessful re- advertisement or worse a peed off employee in a job they started feeling a bit ripped off!

Shutthatdoor Tue 16-Feb-16 17:48:10

The remuneration for my current role is about to increase to £29K p.a., therefore I would be looking for an increase to £31K, to reflect the additional responsibilities and travel involved. I look forward to hearing from you. Yours sincerely, OP.

In that case my work would match it a but no more. I also work in a niche field.

They might look at it again after probation period.

DontCareHowIWantItNow Tue 16-Feb-16 17:49:42

Alas - I specifically mentioned the travelling involved in my current role and got an increase of £3K for it. It depends on the role and how badly they want you.

Good for you.

There is absolutely no way my employers would pay it.

You knew where the job was when you applied.

JolseBaby Tue 16-Feb-16 18:03:46

They came to me, perhaps that was the difference? It's quite usual in my industry to negotiate and throw everything in to the mix when you are agreeing your reward package. Some things you'll get, some you won't. Most of the senior people I have spoken to have been quite pragmatic about paying extra if necessary - especially if that person hasn't come through a headhunter or recruitment agency, as the firm is avoiding paying those fees. Appreciate that other industries will differ, however I am a firm believer in don't ask (nicely) then don't get - I have learned that lesson the hard way!

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now