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To be fucking frustrated i cant get a job? Mental health stigmatism?

(20 Posts)
ScrabbleScream Thu 28-Jan-16 01:28:36

Im well qualified for the position. Exactly meet the person specification requirements in all jobs that I apply for.

I have a solid CV (its been checked by a recruitment consultant, a friend who works in management in the industry and the job centre) and a top notch supporting statement for applications if necessary

I have 18 months experience. The only thing i think that could be holding me back is a 5 year gap on my CV when I couldnt work due to MH.

It looks like im destined to be unemployed again sad

CockwombleJeff Thu 28-Jan-16 02:01:20

I don't think it's the stigma of mental health , but the gap of 5 years on your CV - employers do not like this .

BillSykesDog Thu 28-Jan-16 02:24:14

You don't have to tell them that you were off work for 5 years because of your mental health. You can say anything really. Caring responsibilities, no financial need to work so you took a career break to pursue other interests. Bend the truth a bit if necessary.

VimFuego101 Thu 28-Jan-16 02:29:54

Unless you're applying for an entry level job, 18 months experience is not a lot. Even if it's all that's required for the job, there may be others with much more experience than that applying for the same role.

ScrabbleScream Thu 28-Jan-16 02:30:43

It is entry level Vim. Sorry- probably should of said!

Stumbletrip40 Thu 28-Jan-16 03:00:49

Don't give up - I agree with bill, absolutely. I stopped work a year before I had my DD because I couldn't handle the stress of not being able to get pg - I've instead got a 2 year maternity leave on my CV and I never mention quitting due to stress. Job hunting can be dispiriting for everyone - I've lost count of the number of times my CV has been sent off with lovingly crafted covering letters and got nothing back, remember it's not a referendum on you.

chrome100 Thu 28-Jan-16 05:00:40

Just lie and say you were abroad or something.

Abbinob Thu 28-Jan-16 05:25:00

Is the gap recent i.e 18months experience then 5 yeat gap? If so maybe try some kind of volunteering/work experience (if you can afford it and no childcare issues) to get a bit more recent experience/references

Fairylea Thu 28-Jan-16 05:52:01

It won't be the mental health. It's just the gap. What are you saying about it? As others have said you need to find a way to creatively fill it, using a friend or someone you know as a reference if necessary (cleaning jobs, volunteering, doing admin work for a friend who has a business). Yes you'll get people saying you shouldn't do it but in the grand scheme of things if it gets you employed it will be worth it.

I am all for getting rid of mental health stigma (suffered it myself and have a mum who was sectioned for schizophrenia when I was a child) but when looking for a job or in interviews I wouldn't mention it at all, people can be horrible. My mum always lied and said she'd been off due to physical problems that had resolved, never got caught out for it.

Katenka Thu 28-Jan-16 06:44:57

A five year gap really can effect job prospects.

What are you attributing it to?

Is it 18 months experience and then a 5 year gap?

If it is, I imagine most people won't be counting the experience because it was so long ago.

stumblymonkey Thu 28-Jan-16 07:15:10

Agree with previous posters it not a mental health stigma per se it's the gap on your CV.

I'm afraid I'd be tempted to lie about it (the only time I'd suggest lying on a CV).

Can you say you were travelling? Working for somewhere where you can get a friend or family member to give you a reference?

Otherwise I would have to submit a covering letter or insert a paragraph in the CV that gave an explanation of why you were off and the skills that experience adds: empathy for example?

theycallmemellojello Thu 28-Jan-16 07:17:48

I wouldn't lie but I think if you're suffering from stigma it might be better to say it was a health problem rather than a mental health problem. They won't ask for details, I'd imagine. Good luck.

throwingpebbles Thu 28-Jan-16 07:21:04

Yes, either call it a health problem or a career break.

Employers will worry about unexplained gaps.

sneepy Thu 28-Jan-16 07:26:01

I've just gone back to work after a 9 year stint as a SAHM. it took a good few interviews but I've now got a job I like in my field. Don't give up, at some point you'll click with an interviewer and get an offer. No need to mention mental health, people take time out for all sorts of reasons.

Bearbehind Thu 28-Jan-16 07:44:14

As others have said, I don't agree it is directly linked to your MH.

A 5 year break in employment would need explaining to any potential employer.

A 5 year break due to any health condition would make an employer nervous. If you were unable to work the whole of that time, what ever was wrong must have been bad and they would be wary of it recurring.

PastaLaFeasta Thu 28-Jan-16 07:45:17

Try to think of anything you did in that gap and if you still struggle could you look into volunteer work or doing a short course? It might be a bit tougher to go back to your old role whereas retraining/new direction can be sold as a positive, you've had time out and really considered your career. I'm hoping to go back after a six year break after kids - youngest starts school in September. I've had some positive feedback but not actually gone for any roles properly, my best lead so far was from meeting a recruiter in person at a careers event. I sold it as retraining and having a second career, although I worked for six years before that. I've been doing some amazing voluntary work and one role is very flexible and supportive, they understand if you get a job offer you may leave. It's been great for building confidence and having things to talk about in interview - well things I actually remember as working is a distant memory. I asked for work experience too, a chance to make contact with a local employer and impress, smaller companies may be better able to offer this and you'll get recent experience and a reference.

The employer I'm getting positive responses from is actually really understanding, not all companies are like that but it's a multi national who really value the drive and enthusiasm over experience and gaps etc. There are employer who will give people chances who don't look so good on paper. So try to find ways to show you are super keen and committed. Using contacts is also very helpful for getting a bit of a leg up, a personal recommendation will help overcome an issue like a big gap. I've also wondered whether temping is a little easier to get initially while building experience, although it depends on your flexibility. Good luck!

BlueJug Thu 28-Jan-16 08:25:24

Do you have an idea how many other people have applied for the role? Is it the sort of thing that has been advertised widely?

There may well be 200 others who have applied who are just as well qualified and just came across better - who knows? The assumption that it is mental health stigma is not helpful. (Do you say on your form that you were ill and go detail bt he way)

tobysmum77 Thu 28-Jan-16 08:39:57

OP in the nicest possible way it is one job with one employer. Different employers will have different policies and thought processes. We all in the end need to get the right job to be happy and thrive. When the job is right for you then you will get it.

Have you been working recently or is it immediately after the gap? If it is immediately after then I'd do some temping work until I found the right one. It will give experience to help you and improve self confidence.

smartpeas Thu 28-Jan-16 08:44:53

I had 15+ years out of the workplace with severe MH difficulties and managed to get a good job when I returned. When I was jobhunting I'd look out for 'guaranteed interview' for the disabled schemes which ensured I'd get to interview stage provided I met the minimum requirements. Lots of NHS and other public sector employers use it, plus a few enlightened private sector companies. The way I see it is that I've been disadvantaged enough in life by my MH problems so it was fair enough to get a step up in other ways.

Prayingforsnow Thu 28-Jan-16 08:47:37

I agree that the five year gap would set off alarm bells to an employer,. Also it depends what the field is like. If others applying have more experience or don't have a gap, then they are going to be selected over you.

Are you getting shortlisted for interviews? Is it coming up at interviews?

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