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To think the saying is "for all intent and purposes?"

(31 Posts)
y0rkier0se Thu 14-Jan-16 00:23:10

DP and I can't decide whether the phrase should be "for all intent and purposes" or "for all intensive purposes". Google hasn't helped so calling on the collective wisdom of Mumsnet. It's driving us mad trying to rationalise the phrase and work out which is more logical so we neeeeed help!

OneMillionScovilles Thu 14-Jan-16 00:24:04

For all intents & purposes.

TamaraLamara Thu 14-Jan-16 00:24:38

It's "for all intents and purposes".

OneMillionScovilles Thu 14-Jan-16 00:24:44

What even is an 'intensive purpose'?

whatdoIget Thu 14-Jan-16 00:25:47

For all intents and purposes (whether intensive or not wink)

ChutneyRhodrey Thu 14-Jan-16 00:27:12

For all intents and purposes.

"For all intensive purposes" drives me nuts. I am one of those arseholes who will actually correct people on that one grin

Scarletforya Thu 14-Jan-16 00:28:35

Intents and purposes.

y0rkier0se Thu 14-Jan-16 00:29:48

Good grin it makes sense in my head but trying to explain it is another matter. So say I said 'that's a chicken' and DP said 'no, it's a cockerel', for all intents and purposes it's a chicken? DP thought it meant when using something extremely for it's purpose!

BackInTheRealWorld Thu 14-Jan-16 00:31:18

You are actually all wrong. It actually started out as 'for all in tents, and porpoises'.
It originated from a very popular seaside camping holiday song in the early 1900's.
It's fascinating how language develops over time isn't it.

whatdoIget Thu 14-Jan-16 00:31:27

I'm surprised Google didn't help. I only had to type 'for all in' and it came up in the suggestions. Also my autocorrect on my phone came up with 'and' after I typed 'intents' and then suggested 'purposes'

TamaraLamara Thu 14-Jan-16 00:31:37

Explanation of the basis of the idiom, OP:

The correct phrase is "for all intents and purposes." It originates from English law dating back to the 1500s, which used the phrase "to all intents, constructions, and purposes" to mean "officially" or "effectively."

y0rkier0se Thu 14-Jan-16 00:34:44

Whatdolget it gave me different answers depending on what I typed in - 'intensive purposes' took me to a Wikipedia page explaining 'eggcorns' in language (?) which sounded like it was explaining what I was looking for, and 'intents and purposes' gave a suitable explanation too. I didn't think to see what autocorrect made of it though.

whatdoIget Thu 14-Jan-16 00:37:07

Rely on autocorrect like I do and you never have to think for yourself again (luckily for me grin)

RonniePickering Thu 14-Jan-16 00:38:50

I've just looked on Google and ' for all intensive purposes' is on the first page a few times, bizarrely.

QueenJuggler Thu 14-Jan-16 00:39:19

Isn't it "to all intents and purposes", not "for all intents and purposes"?

It's derived from legal parlance.

emotionsecho Thu 14-Jan-16 00:46:17

Back the song is a parody of the legal phrase 'to all intents and puposes' which has been in use for centuries.

Twgtwf Thu 14-Jan-16 01:07:43

It's "to all in tents and porpoises". It means "aimed at nomadic people and fish".

EBearhug Thu 14-Jan-16 01:12:02

But porpoises aren't fish...

rosewithoutthorns Thu 14-Jan-16 01:25:18

It doesn't really mean anything though does it..

Its a wordy load of shite grin

ThumbWitchesAbroad Thu 14-Jan-16 01:49:23

Queen - that's what I thought too.
Either would work, depending on context, I suppose.

YouthHostellingWithChrisEubank Thu 14-Jan-16 02:55:03

Loving the tents and porpoises explanation!

And grin at "porpoises aren't fish!"

Twgtwf Thu 14-Jan-16 09:55:38

Porpoises are, to all in tents and porpoises, fish.

LilaTheTiger Thu 14-Jan-16 10:02:56

Is it not 'to all intents and purpose'?

LilaTheTiger Thu 14-Jan-16 10:04:35

*purposes.

And I see TamaraLamara already said so grin

ObsidianBlackbirdMcNight Thu 14-Jan-16 10:13:37

Do you know what an eggcorn is? To all intensive purposes is an example of one

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