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to moan about (lack of) Quality Street?

(24 Posts)
PigletJohn Thu 17-Dec-15 15:19:07

Woolies ad - late 1970's - one minute in - £4.99 for 2.5 kg
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Li2XRVt9Clo&feature=player_embedded#t=60



The full extent of the Quality Street scandal
•The £5 tins only contain 756g of chocolate.
•This is a marked decrease from 780g last year.
•Which was a decrease again from the 820g tins the year before that.
•In 2011, the tins contained an entire kilo of chocolate
•And in 2010 they contained 1.3kg.
•The tin is also no longer made of sturdy and attractive metal – it is made of plastic. Sickening.

TaliZorah Thu 17-Dec-15 15:27:57

I hate the plastic tins fangry

BarbaraofSeville Thu 17-Dec-15 15:28:01

Does it say how much they used to cost and how much that would be in today's money?

if they still made those massive tins, they would probably cost about £20? If we want to buy QS cheaply (they were 2 for £6 in Tesco yesterday) we have to accept that you get less than you did 30 odd years ago.

Now people buy them, eat them and go back to buy more - the cost is relatively small comparitively. They had metal tins in Tesco yesterday - they were tiny and about £2.50 for probably 3/400 g of sweets.

Spilose Thu 17-Dec-15 15:29:05

They used to be much more expensive though. You can buy 1.3kg tins on Amazon for £15

PenfoldMagoo Thu 17-Dec-15 15:45:24

I think it is largely down to the fact that they have tried to keep the price the same so customers are not put off by an "increase". Due to inflation keeping the price the same has meant reducing the quantity you get.

As it has gone down in stages, it is less noticeable, although I think the change from the metal tins to the plastic tubs did make it more obvious.

I think value for money may have actually improved though. I got a 1.3kg tin in Tesco for £7.

Being realistic, with inflation, I think 2.5 kg tins would probably be around the £30 mark each now, maybe more, comparing to the increases in prices of things like bread and milk since the 70s.

So really two £7 1.3kg tins now are probably cheaper in real terms.

penguinsarecool Thu 17-Dec-15 15:51:36

Maybe its a government initiative to cut down on junk food? Its was only a few weeks ago that most woman are classfied overweight these days.

AnchorDownDeepBreath Thu 17-Dec-15 15:52:57

Is the OP stolen from the daily fail? It reads suspiciously like fail writing.

AuntieStella Thu 17-Dec-15 15:54:28

Quality Street is not junk food when consumed between 24 December and 6 January.

(I have a metal tin stashed in the corner of the kitchen)

meditrina Thu 17-Dec-15 15:57:03

I've just put £4.99 in 1977 into a historic inflation calculator.

Today, that would be £32.13 (based on RPI)

We3KingyOfOblomovAre Thu 17-Dec-15 16:17:07

I saw this on Facebook. Everything is smaller: Mars bars, packets of crisps, everything.
Makes me so cross. Do they think we are stupid?

GoEasyPudding Thu 17-Dec-15 16:31:51

£32. 13 for a tin of Quality street! Now I know why we were allowed to choose 2 a day!

CallieTorres Thu 17-Dec-15 16:38:23

thank you! at last someone has done it and worked it out

Am fed up with the whole "ripping us off" etc, of course £4.99 was a lot more in those days, i've googled the average wages as well

ave wage in
1970 1,801.30
1971 2,003.88
1972 2,262.18
1973 2,567.74
1974 3,023.55
1975 3,825.44
1976 4,419.69
1977 4,815.42
1978 5,440.25
1979 6,281.70
1980 7,585.53
1981 8,566.07
1982 9,369.56
1983 10,159.44
1984 10,779.08
1985 11,691.52
1986 12,615.15
1987 13,597.24
1988 14,778.08
1989 16,122.89
1990 17,689.37
1991 19,045.83
1992 20,208.51
1993 20,817.53
1994 21,592.65
1995 22,257.04
1996 23,059.85
1997 24,028.75
1998 25,274.48
1999 26,492.52
2000 27,682.89
2001 28,900.94
2002 29,952.88
2003 30,977.15
2004 32,333.61
2005 33,634.71
2006 35,018.85
2007 36,347.63
2008 37,704.10
2009 37,580.11

ouryve Thu 17-Dec-15 16:56:19

That's not average wage. Average overall income for a family, maybe.

VulcanWoman Thu 17-Dec-15 17:16:49

I agree the box has got smaller but so has the price.
I used to love the first smell of the newly open tin.
It's not so special any more fsad

ayria Thu 17-Dec-15 17:17:46

OMG! The size of Quality Street in the 80s! Jealous.

I thought they had got smaller over the years. We used to have them as kids for Xmas and they were bigger than they are thesedays. Everything has got smaller, though.

eckythumpenallthat Thu 17-Dec-15 17:19:11

The box has got smaller but they also still do a larger tin one. Think I paid £6 for mine

VulcanWoman Thu 17-Dec-15 17:22:43

Actual metal for £6, that's good, what's the weight.

NewLife4Me Thu 17-Dec-15 17:25:21

OP, they have large tins in B&M £7 iirc.
We already bought the little ones so had to give it a miss.
I only saw them today so if you have one in your area, they should still have some.
good luck, I much prefer them to Roses.

purplehazed Thu 17-Dec-15 17:53:29

Today in Tesco, 2 tins of Quality Street £6.

StarkyTheDirewolf Thu 17-Dec-15 18:48:50

I'll be honest, disappointed at the size of the tin doesn't come close to finding one stashed in the wardrobe when I was 8, and opening it excitedly to find it contains my mum's sewing kit.

jellyfrizz Thu 17-Dec-15 20:16:45

I am disappointed in the lack of quality street in my house at present.

MrsHathaway Thu 17-Dec-15 21:11:50

I bought a box of just the toffee ones yesterday, for about £2 in a bargain shop.

Fuck the nuts, sickly cremes and so on. Toffee pennies, toffee sticks, caramels, and fudge.

YABU. Quality Street is now my favourite.

WotNoLoobrush Thu 17-Dec-15 21:21:20

At least QS haven't (yet) angled the sides of the tub like Roses have this year.

The same has happened with tins of biscuits over the years. The tins might not be smaller but biscuit quantity/size definitely has sad.

RickRoll Thu 17-Dec-15 21:28:43

Quality Street is vile, sickly shite made by Nestle.

And it's actually far cheaper in real terms than in 1978.

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