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seats on public transport

(246 Posts)
sassyandsixty Mon 01-Jun-15 17:31:06

OK, I know I'm old-fashioned, but is it unreasonable to expect children to give up seats for older people these days? During half-term, a crowd of children rushed onto the train and grabbed seats that older people were aiming for. They then complained when asked (very politely) to give them up. Parents were around, but didn't even try to get their kids to stand - only gave us the evil eye. What is going on here?

yesiwouldlikefrieswiththat Mon 01-Jun-15 17:33:25

How old were the children?

mountainofdreams Mon 01-Jun-15 17:33:33

Not old fashioned at all. I'm in my mid twenties and was taught this as common courtesy!

SaucyJack Mon 01-Jun-15 17:34:03

How much older? Elderly?

I'm older than a teenager, but I'm not rude enough to expect another paying customer to give me their seat just cos I can't be arsed to stand up.

Babiecakes11 Mon 01-Jun-15 17:34:46

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Babiecakes11 Mon 01-Jun-15 17:35:37

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

SunnyBaudelaire Mon 01-Jun-15 17:36:00

this has already been the subject of at least two recent threads. And no doubt it will garner the same answers. why on earth should children stand up for able bodied adults?

WhetherOrNot Mon 01-Jun-15 17:36:00

I'm older than a teenager, but I'm not rude enough to expect another paying customer to give me their seat just cos I can't be arsed to stand up.

Or, in my case, because I can't, eh?

Babiecakes11 Mon 01-Jun-15 17:36:09

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

ThingummyJigg Mon 01-Jun-15 17:37:16

depends on the age of the children imo

small ones topple over a bit, bigger ones (age 10+?) could stand

also depends on 'older' - if you mean a pensioner then yes, anyone could give up a seat (ditto for someone pregnant/on crutches/otherwise unable to stand for long)

But if you mean a 15 year old should give up their seat for someone of 40 then, no, I disagree.

bobajob Mon 01-Jun-15 17:37:28

Depends. If I've paid for a seat for my children I expect them to be able to sit in it.

PHANTOMnamechanger Mon 01-Jun-15 17:38:35

some children are just not taught manners in any form at all, from basic please and thank you, to waiting your turn, respecting others and their property, not dropping litter etc etc. They are led to believe they are mini princes and princesses by their doting parents who think they can do no wrong, and woe betide the teacher or random stranger who DARES to correct them or suggest different behaviour!

that said there is no "one rule fits all" regarding seats on transport - depending on the age/height of the child it may well be safer for them to sit, because they are unable to reach the hand rail. If we are talking able bodied teens/tweens then yes I would agree it is polite for them to offer the seat to an adult, regardless of the adults age or gender, but especially if they are pregnant, juggling toddler/baby, or infirm.

WhetherOrNot Mon 01-Jun-15 17:39:23

If I've paid for a seat for my children I expect them to be able to sit in it.

I think you will find that a train ticket does NOT entitle you or your children to a seat - just getting you from A to B.

DrankSangriaInThePark Mon 01-Jun-15 17:40:43

Depends how old both the kids and the adults are.
Under 5s and possibly as far as under 8s need to sit. Ablewink bodied people under 60 probably don't.
A great lummocking 16yr old and a frail 85 yr old- no contest. But it's rarely that clear cut.
I was shock on another thread that a poster's husband didn't get up to let 'an elderly lady' sit down. And that the Mner thought it was the old lady being rude...
Dd is 11 and I would now expect her to let an old person sit down, but not a 30 yr old bloke for example.

theroundball Mon 01-Jun-15 17:41:04

YANBU but you'd be amazed at the number of people on MN who'll tell you that you are.

DrankSangriaInThePark Mon 01-Jun-15 17:41:16

Sorry, random wink inserted there. Bloody phone.

bobajob Mon 01-Jun-15 17:41:44

I always book seats Whether.

Sirzy Mon 01-Jun-15 17:42:29

I would always stand and let DS sit, he doesn't cope well with standing on public transport.

I would also always give up my seat for someone who looked to be struggling irrespective of age

pointythings Mon 01-Jun-15 17:42:55

Here we go again...

It depends. If you're able bodied and otherwise fit then no, I don't think age should be the deciding factor. Of course it is polite to stand for people who clearly need the seat, but an able bodied 50-year-old should be able to cope with standing and is not automatically entitled to a seat ahead of a child or teenager. (I'm 47)

DrankSangriaInThePark Mon 01-Jun-15 17:43:27

Totally agree with Phantom's first paragraph too. But I bet bobajob doesn't. wink <<<purposely inserted wink

WhetherOrNot Mon 01-Jun-15 17:43:56

During half-term, a crowd of children rushed onto the train and grabbed seats that older people were aiming for

So this doesn't actually apply to you bobajob, does it?

Mrsjayy Mon 01-Jun-15 17:45:25

According to some on mumsnet it is deadly to let children stand they might go crashing through the window orsomething a healthy person over 10 should have the manners to offer somebody less able a seat on the bus. You dont actually pay for aseat on public transport you pay for the journey,

WorraLiberty Mon 01-Jun-15 17:46:03

It seems to be frowned upon on Mumsnet

Thankfully in my real life, I see parents making their kids give up their seats for adults quite a lot.

Lisalou1 Mon 01-Jun-15 17:46:09

This has nothing to do with manners, my kids have been taught taught manners and the importance of respect but I've paid good money for them a seat on a train or a bus then there is no way I'd make them give it up for someone else, sorry.

Jobless123 Mon 01-Jun-15 17:47:02

Some 'older' people get offended at the implication that they are too old to stand up.

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