Talk

Advanced search

cancer breakthrough news

(17 Posts)
lessthanBeau Thu 22-Jan-15 10:18:53

Aibu to think that the possibly amazing new treatments for cancer should not be headline news so early in development. my poor dB is in a lot of pain with his bone Mets and last night we hear of this amazing ultra sound treatment that could revolutionise pain management, him and more than likely lot's of others must have their hopes raised only to be dashed again when they go on to say unlikely to be available for at least 5 years.
I know this stuff has to be reported but hey can't we have a bit of sensitivity for those needing these treatments right now, these amazing breakthroughs will be just too late for the ones suffering now.
its hard enough to deal with, these reports feel like they're rubbing your nose in it.sad

best of luck to everyone living with cancer now and I mean the friends and families too. xxx please give generously if you can to McMillan and cancer research they are both so important. smile

TripTrapTripTrapOverTheBridge Thu 22-Jan-15 10:22:30

I guess that announcing things so far in advance of them potentially being available assists in people paying attention and assists with people funding the research etc?

Ludoole Thu 22-Jan-15 10:24:12

Absolutely agree!!

Ludoole Thu 22-Jan-15 10:25:08

Agree with op that should be

WorraLiberty Thu 22-Jan-15 10:25:17

I'm sorry to hear about your DB thanks

I get the point you're making about people having their hopes dashed, but I don't really see how else they can report it.

If they buried a small article in the middle of the newspapers, they'd probably be accused of not seeing the seriousness of it if you see what I mean?

Icimoi Thu 22-Jan-15 10:28:20

The trouble is that newspapers love a cancer story. If it's not the incredible multitude of things that cause cancer - see www.anorak.co.uk/288298/scare-stories/the-daily-mails-list-of-things-that-give-you-cancer-from-a-to-z.html/ - it's a long succession of miracle cures. It's mostly purely cynical on their part, and I'm sure they don't think about the effects on people who actually have cancer.

CFSKate Thu 22-Jan-15 10:40:53

I agree with TripTrap, maybe it gets them publicity which helps them get more funding. Today's cancer patients are probably benefiting from something that was headline news 10-15 years ago.

NotYouNaanBread Thu 22-Jan-15 12:42:33

It IS news though, and massively important news too. It might not help your brother, but 5, 10, 15 years from now it will save lives (maybe yours and mine) and the scientists who have made this breakthrough deserve to have their years of hard work noticed and celebrated, not downplayed out of sensitivity to those for whom it might be too late.

More annoying, I think, is the drug trial I have just finished for a breakthrough drug that DOES work, but is insanely more expensive than the currently available drug that ALMOST works, so won't be available on the NHS for several years to come, if ever.

firesidechat Thu 22-Jan-15 13:03:46

I think you are being a tiny bit unreasonable. There will always be new treatments that the previous generation of patients won't benefit from. New treatments are good news and they need funding and publicity

My husband has a bladder because a fairly new treatment came out just before he was diagnosed. I know that patients with cancer from before this treatment would probably have had their bladders removed.

A new treatment was mentioned in the papers recently that he may or may not have a chance to try. I'm just happy that cancer treatments aren't standing still and that more people will survive it.

MaidOfStars Thu 22-Jan-15 13:42:17

I am obliged by my funding providers (at the moment, the Medical Research Council) to disseminate my data in a timely fashion. I must do so not just to fellow academic types but to the general public. I don't currently work on anything that would make the daily papers, but colleagues that do (cancer research, stem cell stuff etc) are very well-coached and work very closely with dedicated press officers at my institute to ensure that press releases and so forth are well-written and well-judged. Unfortunately, how the papers choose to relay such press releases is out of our hands. The fucking Daily Mail has a lot to answer for.

It's incredibly important, more now than ever, that the public engages with science.

Charlesroi Thu 22-Jan-15 14:13:24

I appreciate what MaidOfStars is saying (I'm not a professional scientist) and dread the almost daily "experts say hopping on one leg while eating kiwi fruit may reduce your risk of cancer" stories in the papers and on the TV. The interviewers never ask the right questions (or any questions!) and jump to (unclaimed) conclusions. If possible you should read the original report.

OP - it may seem unfair but the research may need more funding to continue, and that will benefit others. Publicity is one way to achieve this and keep donations coming in.

Lilymaid Thu 22-Jan-15 14:17:57

As someone with secondary cancer I often mention these newspaper stories to my Oncologist. On the eat this or that type stories he is always dismissive. On the new advance stories the news is not news to him as it has been widely reported in the medical press and the medical grapevine ages before it ever gets to the likes of the Daily Fail.

lessthanBeau Thu 22-Jan-15 16:04:03

lilymaid that's exactly what I mean, its not the scientists who need funding that I'm taking about, its the way its blasted out in the media and what they do with that info, I have no issues with the articles that are showing us what they may be able to achieve with more funding, or the adverts asking for money, its the stuff that has already had the funding and is seen to be working but has years of clinical trials ahead, yes its great news and should be celebrated but have a heart and think for a minute for the ones who will never be offered the chance to try it. I know I'm probably bu its just very raw at the moment.

lessthanBeau Thu 22-Jan-15 16:04:04

lilymaid that's exactly what I mean, its not the scientists who need funding that I'm taking about, its the way its blasted out in the media and what they do with that info, I have no issues with the articles that are showing us what they may be able to achieve with more funding, or the adverts asking for money, its the stuff that has already had the funding and is seen to be working but has years of clinical trials ahead, yes its great news and should be celebrated but have a heart and think for a minute for the ones who will never be offered the chance to try it. I know I'm probably bu its just very raw at the moment.

projectbabyweight Thu 22-Jan-15 16:26:02

YANBU op and I really feel for you. I am in fact a journalist who reports on cancer findings among other things. I think with every story like this there should me a disclaimer alongside, explaining the possible delay of many years in new treatments reaching patients. I always try to make it clear.

projectbabyweight Thu 22-Jan-15 16:27:01

Should "be" a disclaimer, I mean. Good lord, call myself a writer!

TripTrapTripTrapOverTheBridge Thu 22-Jan-15 17:44:33

But surely the fact that there are years of clinical trials ahead actually costs money and therefore also requires funding? It doesn't suddenly become free

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, watch threads, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now »

Already registered? Log in with: