Talk

Advanced search

aibu to spend less than £50 on dc xmas presents?

(92 Posts)
GinAndSonic Sat 01-Nov-14 09:47:38

Well, it doesnt really matter if IABU because im skint blush.
We dont have much spare cash. My dc are 5 and 3. We never go overboard at birthdays / christmas, so they arent used to being showered in gifts.
I have a barbie sizes wooden dolls house (no furniture or anything) that i got for a fiver in a discount clearance place that i can give dd(3), and i got a barbie with a bed etc for a tenner in the sainsburys sale. My mum has a box full of betty spaghetti toys from my sisters childhood that im going to give her too, plus books, jigsaws from charity shops. Ds (5) will get whichever action figure i can get for a tenner or so, some second hand board games, and magnitex toys (again, from my sisters childhood) and books, jigsaws from charity shops.
They arent deprived, are they?

GinAndSonic Sat 01-Nov-14 09:49:27

They will be getting gifts from my family too

Fairylea Sat 01-Nov-14 09:49:44

Of course they're not deprived! That's all we will be spending on each of ours and we consider that to be quite a lot!

The world has turned Christmas into some sort of consumer competition for parents. It's absolutely fine to just give whatever you can afford. Making the day special is more than just what presents they open.

WonkoTheSane42 Sat 01-Nov-14 09:52:06

The three year old will never even remember what they got for Christmas and will just enjoy opening the wrapping. I vote lots of little cheap things - young kids vastly prefer quantity over quality. You can look on Facebook for a local Buy/Swap/Sell to get bargains, and there's Freecycle etc. Of course your kids aren't deprived!

Marshy Sat 01-Nov-14 09:52:20

Of course they're not deprived. The toys sound lovely. And better that than going into debt for sackfuls of plastic tat!

Caboodle Sat 01-Nov-14 09:52:29

YANBU at all. I have given dc3 second hand stuff for Xmas before...it was in excellent condition and she didn't have a clue. I didn't actually need to buy second hand for financial reasons but I was sick of the waste on Christmas Day. How lovely for your sister too that she gets to see the next generation play with her loved toys.
Where do you live? I have children's books that need a new home. PM me.

WiIdfire Sat 01-Nov-14 09:52:33

I think people who spend more than £50 per person for presents are the unreasonable ones really. The occasional expensive present is fair enough but not every birthday/christmas/celebration etc. Sure your children will have a fab christmas with what you've got them.

JustAShopGirl Sat 01-Nov-14 09:52:35

That's fine. Dolls house without furniture is one of the best things I got when I was little - I made lots of furniture from matchboxes, tissue boxes, cereal box cardboard etc... was fun for years.....

Marylou2 Sat 01-Nov-14 09:52:58

No they're not deprived and YANBU. They'll have their gifts from a lovely mum and YANBU at all. Christmas is about home and family and love not about money and things you can't pay for when January come.I hope you all have a very Happy Christmas.

MissMogwi Sat 01-Nov-14 09:52:58

That's sounds great, I bet they will love it.

Brace yourself though for the hundreds of threads on here with lists that require a remortgage. grin

CaptainAnkles Sat 01-Nov-14 09:53:27

It doesn't matter what the actual cost is. The point is, will they be thrilled with what they unwrap on Christmas morning? It sounds to me like they've got some lovely things. smile

jellybelly701 Sat 01-Nov-14 09:55:11

Of course YANBU. I have DS first birthday and Christmas within a week of each other. I have probably spent about the same and have got most of his presents from charity shops as I am pretty skint too.

I did have a look on eBay recently and was impressed with the cheap stocking fillers they have. I got DS a painted wooden flute for something like £1.50 with free delivery. You might find some action figures on there. If not your list sounds perfectly fine anyway and I'm sure the DC will have a lovely Christmas regardless of how much money you spend.

throckenholt Sat 01-Nov-14 09:55:17

Not unreasonable at all. Spend whatever makes sense to you in your circumstances. Especially at that age when they are not so driven by peer pressure and consumerism. Definitely raid the charity shops - lots of age appropriate stuff normally.

I wouldn't go for lots of little things - but that is personal preference. I hate seeing them rip the paper off, glance at whatever it is and then straight on to the next one, repeatedly.

ouryve Sat 01-Nov-14 09:55:25

Of course yanbu!

QuillPen Sat 01-Nov-14 09:56:38

£50 is about what we do spend per child every year (for everything).

YANBU.

londonrach Sat 01-Nov-14 09:58:06

Sisters two are getting second hand playmobile from me for xmas from fb site. Asked sister before and she choose which she thought they like. I paid. Means they get more playmobile for the money. Of course yanbu. The children will just enjoy unwrapping everything. Sounds like you got some lovely toys. £50 is certainly plenty. X

makeminered Sat 01-Nov-14 10:00:54

Get a few pound shop things to bulk things out. Don't forget that any essentials they need over the next couple of months (like pants or socks) can be saved to be wrapped up too.

usualsuspect333 Sat 01-Nov-14 10:05:20

YANBU but people who do spend over £50 are not being unreasonable either.

liquidstatehasrisenagain Sat 01-Nov-14 10:06:22

Its not a set rule that you have to spend £100s of pounds on presents! I had a very low income upbringing and I never felt deprived or unloved when I unwrapped my presents, and yes with hidsight there were an awful amount of ones not in their packaging. My mum used to 'set' them up so we didnt notice.

I'll be setting a limit of £50 when DD (16 weeks) is older. As it happens her pressies this year cost £15.

this is my mantra...
Something they want
Something they need
Something to wear
something to read

YANBU

IsabellaofFrance Sat 01-Nov-14 10:06:54

Of course you are not.

What is unreasonable is people getting into debt over Christmas. Its just a day and not worth spending the whole of the new year stressing about and trying to pay off.

inneedofsomeclarity Sat 01-Nov-14 10:09:53

That sounds fab to me-they will love them. I also hit the pound shops-some of my dds most loved pressies come from poundland!

Minikievs Sat 01-Nov-14 10:15:05

People can spend whatever they like/can afford. If it's a present their children will enjoy and the day is spent with love and fun, then that's all they need.
Your presents sound thoughtful and fun regardless of if they were £50 or £500. They're not deprived in the slightest

MandarinCheesecake Sat 01-Nov-14 10:19:04

No you are absolutely not being Unreasonable and your children will not be deprived!
Its not what you spend, or where you buy them, its buying presents that will be greatly received.

When dc's were little I used to buy most of their presents second hand, they didn't need new and didn't care where they came from. We also didn't have a huge amount of money to spend.

But now that we have no budget restrictions have realised that the amount that we do spend is ridiculous. And most of the time the presents are not appreciated (extended family members) so we are going back to basics this year!!

I am sure your Dc's will love everything they receive wherever its come from!!

PrettyPictures92 Sat 01-Nov-14 10:21:11

Definitely not deprived!

And btw... Betty spaghetti is effing awesome! grin <nostalgic>

FreudiansSlipper Sat 01-Nov-14 10:26:34

Yanbu

Last year I spent £80 on ds and similar amount this year he is 7. I thought about what I was buying no last minute must get something buys, lots of offers about and there is just no need to be spending hundreds of pounds on young children. When he was younger I spent less few things from pound shop and tub of duplo

He gets presents from his dad too many toys hardly get played with I am trying to teach him the value of things but when he gets so much the message is not always getting across ....

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now