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To think if you're running a B&B

(29 Posts)
NurseyWursey Sun 30-Mar-14 16:21:45

you shouldn't expect people to take their shoes off at the door... and put the slippers on offer on.

I'm watching Four In A Bed

The woman said 'well this is my home and thats how I like it'

Well I think it may be your home but it's also a business...

SuburbanRhonda Sun 30-Mar-14 16:28:23

I've posted this before - if you don't like compulsory slipper-wearing, don't ever go to Germany.

I was confronted with these on more than one occasion - punishment for if you don't bring your own grin

SweetPenelope Sun 30-Mar-14 16:49:50

I went to a wedding in Germany once and there was a polished wooden floor in the old stately home/registry office it was held in. We all had to take off our shoes and wear those felt shoes (the ones SuburbanRhonda has posted a picture of) during the ceremony. Everybody had to wear the slippers, not just women wearing stilettos, which admittedly would have damaged the floor.

PooroldJumbo Sun 30-Mar-14 18:09:47

I don't think the B&B owners were that out of order. It is their home, I have a no outdoor shoes rule in my home. I don't want the filth and dirt shoes pick up on the street walked onto my carpets. As the owners provided slippers for their guests it doesn't seem a big ask.

OOAOML Sun 30-Mar-14 18:14:17

I didn't see the episode, but if I'm paying to stay somewhere I don't really want to have to wear slippers that have been worn by lots of other people - were they new ones?

BadLad Sun 30-Mar-14 18:16:24

OP, may I suggest you never set foot in Japan.

SconeRhymesWithGone Sun 30-Mar-14 18:20:03

We stayed in a delightful B&B in the Scottish Highlands where we were asked to remove our shoes. I am not used to doing this, but we did not mind at all because the owners were very friendly and welcoming, the B&B was the nicest we had stayed in anywhere, and it was fun padding around this lovely old house in our socks.

LynetteScavo Sun 30-Mar-14 18:24:01

I too have had to wear felt shoes on a wooden floor in a museum in Germany. I was a teenager and took advantage of being able to skid

LynetteScavo Sun 30-Mar-14 18:25:07

Oh, and B&B's are odd places. You have to roll with the house rules.

Dsheetsbucks9 Sun 30-Mar-14 18:26:05

I guess the answer is if you don't want to stay in someone's home then stay in a hotel and keep your shoes on.

phantomnamechanger Sun 30-Mar-14 18:32:22

I'd rather stay in a place that had a no shoes rule, than one that allows shoes and you don't know what's walked all over the carpets. We have no shoes rule at home too, though would not expect someone coming for short visit to comply - then again they would be confined to one or 2 rooms, only one of which is carpeted.

We regularly stay on a dairy farm. Shoes/wellies off at the main door is common sense! Nuff said!

5Foot5 Sun 30-Mar-14 19:04:09

At one gite we stayed at in France the owner had special slippers that we were supposed to wear on the wooden floors and then sort of skate across the floor instead of walking so that we polished it at the same time. It was quite fun for a few days but we couldn't keep it up for the full fortnight.

Oh and yes in Germany we were presented with slippers for indoors too.

saltlakecity Sun 30-Mar-14 19:08:44

I would find it incredibly rude. If you want a no shoes house then don't run a b&b. I also find it uncomfortable in people's homes. I don't like taking my shoes off.

Ilovexmastime Sun 30-Mar-14 19:08:58

I would hate that. I hate taking my shoes off in other people's houses, so if I were paying for the privilage too then I'd be doubly pissed off.
I realise that it's entirely reasonable of people to ask meto ttake off my shoes in their house, but I reserve the right to hate doing it!

NurseyWursey Sun 30-Mar-14 19:20:06

OP, may I suggest you never set foot in Japan
I have already been smile that is their culture and of course I respect it

However in England it's their personal choice, and as a B&B owner your job is surely to cater to your clients? I think B&B owners seem to have a problem with differentiating the place with their home and their business.

It would put me off staying somewhere.

LettertoHermioneGranger Sun 30-Mar-14 19:25:54

When you say 'on offer' do you mean being offered for free or being offered to purchase?

I don't mind the no shoes rule at all. But it's incredibly cheeky to have a no shoes rule and then have slippers available to buy, leaving someone with no choice if they didn't think to bring their own. I've seen that, I think it's terrible.

Slippers can be very inexpensive, I think if you're running a B&B it's only right to offer a new complimentary pair for each guest when there's a no shoe rule.

Peekingduck Sun 30-Mar-14 19:30:36

I used to own a B+B. We didn't insist that people took their outdoor shoes off. However it was really nice when they did, and quite considerate of them. Really sweet when big hefty workmen would leave their boots at the door and make themselves at home in their socks and slippers from home. It's easy to drag dirt in with you on outdoor shoes, and a real pain for a B+B owner faced with a filthy carpet to deal with on turnaround day.

NurseyWursey Sun 30-Mar-14 19:34:24

Letter They were given them on TV, not sure if they've offer all guests them for free.

Personally I wouldn't like to wear slippers someone else had been wearing, washed or not - although may be hypocritical because of bedsheets etc

peeking Although I wouldn't like to change my shoes I wouldn't dream of walking through with workboots or muddy shoes on, surely that's just courtesy

fairyfuckwings Sun 30-Mar-14 19:41:59

I would be very taken aback if asked to remove my shoes as a paying guest!

I'm actually looking for somewhere cheap to stay en route to France during the easter holidays and have made a mental note to perhaps pay a little more in order to avoid b&bs and such nonsense!

Peekingduck Sun 30-Mar-14 19:51:58

People do walk through B+B's in shoes that are muddy, covered in wet grass and many times I've been on my knees on checkout day trying to remove mystery oily stains in the shape of shoe treads from carpets. I pretty much expected shoes to be used in the public areas, but used to bulk buy disposable slippers to leave in the rooms and hope people would take the hint. I wouldn't walk around my own home in outdoor shoes, so I don't do it when I'm in a B+B either because generally they feel like a home. Even in a hotel I tend to discard my shoes when I arrive at the room.
I'm probably influenced by being on the other side of the fence. I'm certainly extremely fussy about standards of cleanliness and facilities on offer!

WetAugust Sun 30-Mar-14 19:54:53

You know when you book into a really smart hotel and they have a pair of towelling slippers in a plastic bag in the bathroom.

Are they disposible or do they take them away and clean them ready for the next occupant of the room.

Only asking because I have never closely inspected them - just ignored them blush

BikeRunSki Sun 30-Mar-14 19:59:09

It does seem fairly British to expect to wear outdoor shoes indoors at home. I am English and I think it's horrible!!!

Iheartcrunchiebars Sun 30-Mar-14 20:08:04

I run a b&b. We provide slippers in rooms and would prefer guests not to wear shoes but never tell them to take them off. In the end they are paying to stay. If I have to clean the mud off the floor so be it!

Although every single guest we have ever had has taken their shoes off. And Four in a Bed is crazy. No guests ever act like them.

Also the slippers are always disposed off (if the guests don't take them home with them).

PunkrockerGirl Sun 30-Mar-14 20:27:46

Didn't see this episode so can't really comment. It's a difficult one isn't it when it's both a home and a business. My DH teaches from home ( adults and children). Most of the children kick their shoes off by the door (DH never asks them to). The adults don't and trail all sorts of shot across the carpets

I love Four In A Bed grin

PunkrockerGirl Sun 30-Mar-14 20:28:49

shit bloody autocorrect

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