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Why do people say

(26 Posts)
dinkybinky Sun 11-Nov-12 19:10:41

He did good in the exams or you did good to save that goal? It well not good!!! Do you say well or is it now common practice to overuse the word good?

MadameCastafiore Sun 11-Nov-12 19:12:03

Good question!

HecatePropylaea Sun 11-Nov-12 19:12:33

I think it's an americanism, probably from the tv shows.

InSPsFanjoNoOneHearsYouScream Sun 11-Nov-12 19:12:39

You did good pointing that out

JamieandtheMagicTorch Sun 11-Nov-12 19:16:28

"The boy done good" is also came from someone with a London accent (probably a football manager). AFAIK

Shutupanddrive Sun 11-Nov-12 19:20:52

Also can i get instead of can I have angry

RuleBritannia Sun 11-Nov-12 19:21:11

Well, English grammar rules dictate that 'good' is an adjective and 'well' is an adverb so 'good' is incorrect in the examples given. I'm with you all.

"How are you?"
"I'm good"

is another irritation. Does the answer mean that he is well-behaved?

stargirl1701 Sun 11-Nov-12 19:22:58

Can I have? instead of May I have? Grrr.

OHforDUCKScake Sun 11-Nov-12 19:24:27

Its almost as bad as 'my bad'

I cringe when I hear an american say 'GOOD JOB' (good juuub) and dread the day that makes it over here.

InSPsFanjoNoOneHearsYouScream Sun 11-Nov-12 19:25:39

My grammar is appalling so I can't comment tbh grin

Slothlorien Sun 11-Nov-12 19:28:11

Yes I can't stand the 'I'm good ' thing either.
And its even worse when people say ' can I get. .' rather than 'can I have'. NO!!

Alisvolatpropiis Sun 11-Nov-12 19:28:39

I haven't heard "she did good at x" except the phrase the boy/girl did good.

"Can I get" on the other hand. My ever so lovely friend says it and there are times when I consider pinching her. Ever single time she says it. As a kind of aversion therapy. It would be for her own good,surely that makes it reasonable?!

Alisvolatpropiis Sun 11-Nov-12 19:28:57

*every not ever

OutragedAtThePriceOfFreddos Sun 11-Nov-12 19:30:28

If I heard someone speaking like that I would judge them as likely to be a twat.

redrighthand Sun 11-Nov-12 20:45:12

Yes, if they reply "I'm good" I say, "I asked how you are, not what you are".

Kendodd Sun 11-Nov-12 20:52:28

I think that one of the strengths of English is that it does change and evolve, the language is alive.

In none of these situations the meaning is unclear so I don't see the problem.

InSPsFanjoNoOneHearsYouScream Sun 11-Nov-12 20:54:37

I say all these things that bothers people.

I'm good though. I don't mind people think I'm a test due to language. I tend to judge twattishness on what people say or do not how good their grammar is

nightlurker Mon 12-Nov-12 03:25:29

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

MortimersRaven Mon 12-Nov-12 03:34:35

Starbucks last Christmas - their slogan was 'Let's Merry'

Let's Merry?

There are so many things wrong with that. It annoys me a year later.

Everlong Mon 12-Nov-12 07:26:02

Good job is well done in America.

Drove me potty this summer.

Tee2072 Mon 12-Nov-12 07:31:07

Well, good job to all of you for having such a stress free life that you have time to fret about how others talk.

This American over here will concern herself with important things. Such as a country that thinks spotted dick is a normal name for a pudding and that it's perfectly fine for a 50 year old woman to call her mother mummy.

grin

AntsMarching Mon 12-Nov-12 08:15:46

Good job Tee. You made this American laugh grin

I say "might could". It's said where I come from in America.

dysfunctionalme Mon 12-Nov-12 08:21:25

redright Yes, if they reply "I'm good" I say, "I asked how you are, not what you are".
You sound like a complete tosser. I'm surprised anyone speaks to you at all.

JenFawkes Mon 12-Nov-12 09:33:48

What is wrong with good job? We say proper job down here but you have to have the right accent for it grin

Feminine Mon 12-Nov-12 09:37:56

Lord above!

Most of the Americans I know, have a better command of the British language than us Brits.

Don't even get me started on the crazy spelling I see in the UK.

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