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To want the school to give DD her medicine?

(26 Posts)
cathkidstonbag Tue 06-Nov-12 13:07:25

DD is in year 6. Unfortunately she gets a lot of ear/throat infections. Usually after 48 hours at home she's well enough for school. If she is on 4x a day antibiotics I send them in to her school office with a signed note. Just a syringe full of medicine not the bottle. At lunchtime she goes to the office, takes it, job done.

Today I've sent her in with it and get a phone call. Apparently new government guidelines mean that they can no longer do this. I have to either come up to the school (can't happen, I'm working!), or keep her home, for the full 10 day course.

I've phoned the drs who don't want to change her medicine as they want her on this one 4x a day.

Are there new guidelines on this? I don't ask them to administer the medicine, just keep it cold!

Aibu??

squeakytoy Tue 06-Nov-12 13:08:37

How old is year 6? cant she just take it herself?

cathkidstonbag Tue 06-Nov-12 13:09:29

She's 10. Apparently they can't keep medicine in their bag either and she doesn't want to get in trouble.

ClaimedByMe Tue 06-Nov-12 13:10:39

This has always been the guidelines since my dd started school and she is in P5 now, they will administer long term medicine but not antibiotics or calpol/nurofen.

whois Tue 06-Nov-12 13:10:57

That's redic. Surely the school has interpreted something wrong otherwise how will chronically Ill children be able to attend school?

Bunbaker Tue 06-Nov-12 13:13:24

Blimey. How unhelpful is that! This is PC gone mad.

The change in guidelines must have been very recent. DD is year 8 and when she was at primary school their policy was that they would administer prescribed medication, but not Calpol.

Can your daughter go to where the medicine is kept and just take it herself?

FlibberdeGibbet Tue 06-Nov-12 13:13:42

No such guidelines.... this is twaddle! The school should have a robust medicine policy. I can understand why they are wary of administering, but if their policy is sound, and their staff adequately trained there should be no problem.

I would suggest you write to the Headteacher in the first instance, asking for a copy of their medicine policy, then take it up with the Chair of Governors if you get no joy.

It is absolutely bonkers that a healthy child should be kept off school for the duration of a course of medication! The school would be the first to complain if you were taking her out for a 10 day term time holiday!

ManifestingMingeHooHoosAgain Tue 06-Nov-12 13:14:03

I would ask to see this 'rule' I bet it doesn't exist or they have mis-interpreted it.

Generally, they can give medicine if it is prescribed by a Dr (ie not just some calpol you are sending in yourself) and there should be a school policy which covers this.

Options - I would do plan A - ask to see this policy and insist she has the medicine at school - they supervise her self administering it maybe?

Or plan B - she has the medicine just before school, straight after school, after tea and last thing at night. Not ideal as the gaps between doses will be less than they should be ideally.

I would definitely not keep her off, if she is well enough to attend.

BarbarianMum Tue 06-Nov-12 13:14:47

A guideline is just that - a guideline. They don't have to follow it - and presumably don't for children who need regular insulin/asthma medication etc etc.

So challenge it - go in and argue your case. Are they saying that the doctor is wrong? Do they really want her to miss that much school every time she has an ear infection? Put these questions to them in person and in writing.

I had this last year w. ds1, who also gets difficult to shift ear infections. Within 2 days he was an 'exception' to the guideline. smile

WorraLiberty Tue 06-Nov-12 13:17:41

I don't know anything about new guidelines

My DS's schools would be happy to administer it but not if you sent it in a syringe.

It has to be in it's original bottle with the child's name and date on.

cathkidstonbag Tue 06-Nov-12 13:17:50

It seems crazy to me when I'm not even allowed to take her out of school for a days holiday!! She doesn't need anyone to give it to her, just keep it cold. I'd be fine with it being in a cool bag on her peg even but that's not very safe obviously.

Do they really think I have nothing better to do than go to school every lunchtime? And if I keep her home every time she needs antibiotics it will be a lot of time off.

Will ask for their policy this afternoon.

Justforlaughs Tue 06-Nov-12 13:18:43

In my experience the school needs a form filled in EVERY time they administer medicine and even that used to drive me nuts. It does ott though. Is there anyone, friend or relative that could possibly go to the school and help out if necessary. I'd ask the school to write a letter explaining why THEY won't allow your child to go to school for when the truancy officer comes knocking!

cathkidstonbag Tue 06-Nov-12 13:19:02

The reason it's in a syringe is because I worry that she might forget the bottle and then miss the evenings doses. The letter I sent in says what it is and the dose she needs.

GummiberryJuice Tue 06-Nov-12 13:20:34

The whole time my dd was at primary school she was on eye drops she had 3 operations after these I had to drive to the school to adminster drops as school refused to do so it was a bloomin nightmare.

My fuel bill was a disgrace, it was 20 min round trip plus time spent it was an hour out of my day, thankfully I work from home not sure what I would have done if I was an employee somewhere. I got fed up and started to get up really early and going to bed really late to fit the doses in so I only had to go to the school once.

EdsRedeemingQualities Tue 06-Nov-12 13:21:25

Thanks for this thread, I was worried about asking school to give ds2 (5) his antibiotics for a poorly tooth.

I haven't asked them yet. If they say no, do I just keep him off for five days?!

Hope your dd is better soon.

SamSmalaidh Tue 06-Nov-12 13:21:40

Put it in writing to the Head and Chair of Governors. Clarify that they are unwilling to allow your DD to take prescribed medicine at school and so are forcing her to miss 10 days of education.

cathkidstonbag Tue 06-Nov-12 13:26:18

Eds- depends on the school. My youngest DD's school has a school nurse who is happy to administer medicine (and a cuddle). Never had a problem there. Sign a form that lasts the course of the medicine and that's all.

EdsRedeemingQualities Tue 06-Nov-12 13:33:06

Oh brill, thankyou for the advice x

My DD's school is happy to administer medicine as long as it is prescribed. However, would need the bottle with the directions on.

GhostShip Tue 06-Nov-12 13:41:21

In a care home setting, you have to have signatures for giving medications out and everything has to be documented. I wondered why the same isn't for schools? I don't understand why teachers can just give meds out, but qualified people can't?

Which it has changed and why there's guidelines.

They can do so, but it's a load of palaver.

GhostShip Tue 06-Nov-12 13:43:51

The teachers giving out the medicine need training in how to do so properly, and have a form saying so.
Then the parental agreement for school to administer medicine has to be completed
Headteacher agreement of request form
Record of medicine administered to child..

neolara Tue 06-Nov-12 13:44:50

There should be a policy re medicines which has been agreed the governors. Please ask to see it.

GhostShip Tue 06-Nov-12 13:45:40

www.education.gov.uk/schools/pupilsupport/pastoralcare/b0013771/managing-medicines-in-schools

The relevant forms are on the 'connected to this' sidebar on that website OP, so you might want to have a look so you can speak to the school

DeWe Tue 06-Nov-12 13:55:05

Ours wouldn't do it in the syringe, I think. They have to see the bottle and be able to see it is what you say it is. Ask them if you send the bottle, if it's okay.

thezoobmeister Tue 06-Nov-12 14:00:10

My DDs school has the same policy. A complete PITA as I have to go in to give her antibiotics when she has a chest infection.

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