Advertisement

loader

Talk

Advanced search

Aibu to despair on the never ending pink / glizy / dolly present ideas for dd?

(12 Posts)
Bigwheel Tue 16-Oct-12 21:04:04

Dd is 2.5. She has a big brother so we already have lots of toys which I guess are associated with boys - garages, trains, cars etc. dd loves playing with these which I have no issues with at all. However I decided this Christmas to get her some toys of her own. I always find shops seem to have a 'girl' and 'boy' aisle. The 'boy' aisle is quite interesting, telescopes, bug hunting kits, space mobiles, globes etc. the 'girls' aisle is just fill of pink plastic basically involving looking pretty or looking after a baby eg - princess make up, plastic dressing up shoes, prams, dolls etc. in all honestly dd would love all that, but surely there's more to girls toys than this? And yes I know I could buy her the telescopes etc but there certainly not being marketed towards girls. Aibu to just think this is just wrong and wonder what in earth I'm going to buy my daughter?

YANBU

Pisses me off no end.

cantspel Tue 16-Oct-12 21:06:35

If she would love it what is wrong with buying her some?

It is not one or the other she can have some pink shit and a telescope you know.

Sirzy Tue 16-Oct-12 21:08:24

I agree, I don't see why we need 'girls toys' and 'boys toys'

I have a DS so have the opposite problem. He has a toy kitchen which is apparently a girls toy. I struggled to find a tea set to go with it that wasn't really girly.

My biggest annoyance is companies who make two of the same toy - one in pink and one in blue/multicoloured. Talk about cashing in on gender stereotypes

Sirzy Tue 16-Oct-12 21:09:04

I missed the bit about her loving it. If that is the case I would grin and bear it!

FourEyesGold Tue 16-Oct-12 21:09:25

Buy your daughter things she will enjoy. Some might be pink; some might be traditionally seen as boys' toys. My daughter loves Hello Kitty, trains, slugs and pink sparkly crap.

MrsTerryPratchett Tue 16-Oct-12 21:11:45

Boy's version

Girl's version

Makes me want to puke.

Goofymum Tue 16-Oct-12 21:12:20

Just buy her what she loves, forget about whether it is aimed at boys or girls. If she loves more traditional boys toys get her some of her own. We got my DD a pirateship when she was 3 and she loved it. Both DDs play with it now several years later. Books are always good. Also drawing and art stuff, lots of paint and paper - 3 year olds are getting into creative stuff in a big way. Playdough, moonsand, playmobil.

Bigwheel Tue 16-Oct-12 21:15:48

I do buy her pink bits as despite my best efforts she is very into pink, glizzy shit stuff. Equally ds has a toy kitchen ( tesco used to do a great orange / grey one with matching tea set) and a buggy. It just bugs me how the 'typical' girls toys seem to focus on making themselves look pretty and raising babies. I really hope there's more to life for my dd than this.

I've actually banned pink clothes for my DD when she's born and I'm going to do my best to avoid getting too many pink toys, I'm really not willing to pigeonhole her at such a young age.

SavoyCabbage Tue 16-Oct-12 21:25:30

It is annoying I don't but have learned to work around it.

If stuff is supposed to be pink, like a My Little Pony sparkle-house or similar you have to go with it. Its like a farm would usually have a red barn.

If its not supposed to be, like a kitchen or a telescope or LEGO then I don't get pink.

Goofymum Tue 16-Oct-12 21:40:09

There is so much pink pretty stereotypical stuff out there for girls but there's plenty of stuff that is not like that. I've always given my girls a mixture just like I had when I was young.

For me, I believe it's much more important for my DDs to see me and DH as role models, that I have a good career, my DH also works hard and does his fair share, we do our best to give them self esteem and to ensure they have choices when they're older so that they do not feel they cannot do certain things or be something just because they are female.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now