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Tothink that miscarriage and pregnancy bleeding infomation should be in early pregnancy packs

(20 Posts)
Jackfrostmanson Sat 13-Oct-12 07:37:31

How can we persuade the NHS to give information on miscarriage in early pregnancy packs. I know how scared and confused I was when it happened to me. I don't think any women should have to worry about what to do when you start to miscarry. The information could be used to offer some reassurance and practical tips on what to and what to except when you miscarry or have pregnancy bleeding.I know if I had that in my pregnancy pack Iwould have been more prepared than I was.
What does everyone else think?

Thelobsterswife Sat 13-Oct-12 07:49:41

I think it would be a good idea but which packs do you mean? I don't think I got any packs until the 12 week scan, at which point I had already had bleeding in all three of my pregnancies, one of which resulted in mc. I agree though that there is little information out there other than the internet. I had bleeding with both of my pregnancies that continued to term, but the only information on bleeding that I could find in any of the pregnancy books, was in the chapter entitled 'when things go wrong' which I didn't feel like reading when I was worried sick about the bleeding. On the other hand, when I had an early scan because of bleeding and sent home to probably miscarry, my expectations were not managed at all. I had labour type pains but I wasn't warned about this at all and not given any advice about pain relief. It was truly horrible and I think I could have been supported better.
Sorry to hear you have had a miscarriage. Hope you are feeling ok now.

Proudnscary Sat 13-Oct-12 07:53:03

I had bleeding through three pregnancies - one ended in mc, the other two ended in dcs.

The bleeding was entirely different all three times (early spotting at 6-8 weeks, large blood loss at 18 weeks - which didn't end in miscarriage - and bleeding monthly throughout).

The medics were pretty much at a loss to explain any of the episodes even after scanning.

Sometimes they just don't know and don't know what will happen and what to advise.

So...not sure what they could say other than 'ring NHS Direct' or go to hospital.

That said I agree it should be acknowledged in early pregnancy packs as, sadly, bleeding and miscarriage is so common.

Proudnscary Sat 13-Oct-12 07:53:47

Oh very coincidental X post with Lobsterswife - we had the same experience.

Fakebook Sat 13-Oct-12 07:54:04

I agree. When it happened to me the first time I was in complete shock, stunned and numb with fear. I had to get all my information from the Internet and that caused even more unrest. A simple leaflet explaining who to contact, what to do, given at the first doctors appointment to confirm pregnancy would be good.

Where I live you don't get a mw's appointment until you're at least 10weeks, because most miscarriages will happen before that.

Secondsop Sat 13-Oct-12 07:54:12

I agree entirely. At my booking appointment the possibility was not even mentioned, perhaps out of a genuine attempt not to worry people, but given how common miscarriage is I for one would have coped a lot better with mine had I had some information beforehand about what to do, resources, and statistics (which, once I'd heard them, both gave me hope for the future and also helped me feel less like I'd been unfairly singled out by fate). It would have also helped in my current pregnancy to have had some information about coping with a pregnancy after a miscarriage, as nurses and midwives kept basically telling me to cheer up and how this was supposed to be an exciting time, so my complicated feelings of sadness and joy in equal measure went unacknowledged. If it weren't for the Internet I would have been completely at sea.

OP as I assume you are speaking from personal experience, I hope you've been able to find the support that you need.

SoupInaBasket Sat 13-Oct-12 07:56:04

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

WelshMaenad Sat 13-Oct-12 08:28:25

The cynic in me wonders if they prefer to remain gatekeepers to services to prevent undue strain on EPUs. Giving women the information that bleeding = a scan might result in an awful lot of reported bleeding, IYSWIM. I have encountered many people on forums over the years who have pretended they are bleeding to get an early scan without having to pay for it.

I've had two miscarriages and there were good and bad elements to my care... I think do much is dependent on the midwife you get. First one was awful, really brusque and unempathetic. Second one was wonderfully supportive. Midwife who dealt with me when I went in bleeding heavily with DS, confident I was losing again only to find a heartbeat and a haematoma, was likewise superb. Luck if the draw, sadly.

Birdsgottafly Sat 13-Oct-12 12:18:42

Most women mc before they get a pregnancy pack and idon't think that it should be included, it should be on an 'as and when' basis.

I think that we need better after care services nationally.

I am in Liverpool and our 'Women's hospital' is very good, it has a 24 hour A&E type service for any worries.

I have had friends who have had bleeding throught their successful pregnancies. They didn't need to know the worse possible outcome.

You wouldn't give end of life information when giving out a leaflet on Chemotherapy, for example.

MC should be dealt with seperate to pregnancy, as individuals vary, and so does the mc. I have had a few and had to have a D&C after two.

There is an underinvestment in some areas of the country in maternity services, which is the real issue.

GhostShip Sat 13-Oct-12 13:20:47

I'm not sure.

I'm not sure what sort of information they could give, as I know from experience of my own and others, that miscarriages vary so much.

GhostShip Sat 13-Oct-12 13:22:03

Maternity services are stretched anyway

The government are giving them 140 million... But not for more staff, which is what they really need. But for the creation of a fancy computer system to reduce paperwork hmm

Moominsarescary Sat 13-Oct-12 13:34:06

I've had two early mc and one late one, the early ones were before 8 weeks which is when your booked into see the mw in our area. Both times I phoned the gp and he arranged tests.

As most mc happen early I'm not sure how they could give out information. I think there should be more information on second and third trimester mc/ stillbirths, which in some cases are preventable if we had more scans/ hospital appointments

Secondsop Sat 13-Oct-12 16:30:48

For my pregnancy that ended in miscarriage, my booking appointment with the midwives was really early - at 6 weeks - so there would have been opportunity to provide information about first-trimester miscarriage. For my current pregnancy (with a different borough as I'd moved house), the booking appointment was at 12 weeks, and that was a bit late generally as by the time I had my dating scan it turned out that I only just made the date cut off for a nuchal screen - literally the last day it could have been performed. So I think the timing does depend on area.

Secondsop Sat 13-Oct-12 16:33:11

For my pregnancy that ended in miscarriage, my booking appointment with the midwives was really early - at 6 weeks - so there would have been opportunity to provide information about first-trimester miscarriage. For my current pregnancy (with a different borough as I'd moved house), the booking appointment was at 12 weeks, and that was a bit late generally as by the time I had my dating scan it turned out that I only just made the date cut off for a nuchal screen - literally the last day it could have been performed. So I think the timing does depend on area.

Phineyj Sat 13-Oct-12 16:47:21

I had this experience - I finally got pregnant after years of trying, then it failed at 5 weeks - on the day that the GP had given me the publication called "Emma's Diary". I don't know if the NHS still give this out, but it is a relentlessly positive document based on a ficitional lady called "Emma" and her relentlessly positive pregnancy experiences. There's nothing in there about how common early miscarriages apart from a brief listing for the National Miscarriage Association in the index in the back (I think that's the organisation - might have been the bereavement one).

I think that while people know many pregnancies end at an early stage there is a strong taboo around discussing it and so it's not included. Not very helpful in my opinion.

BionicEmu Sat 13-Oct-12 16:48:31

It's a tricky one because of the timing I guess. I've been incredibly lucky to have never suffered any bleeding or miscarriages (fingers and toes crossed, knock on wood as I'm currently 24 weeks with DC2), so am not really sure what would be helpful, and when. I'm v sorry for all your sad experiences though.

However, after DC1 I have often thought that there should be some kind of warning about premature labour - along the lines of "if you experience any of these symptoms then call your MW or labour suite." But then I went into labour with DC1 at 33 weeks and stupidly had no idea that that's what it was.

Also, I'm booked at a different hospital this time round and the notes are totally different. My last hospital's notes had sections on watching out for signs of pre-eclampsia, and about lack of movements, and lots else, but my new hospital's notes have nothing at all like that. According to my MW there is a standard NHS pregnancy notes, but most hospitals don't use it and use their own instead. And the only thing I've ever been given have been my pregnancy notes and the bounty pack.

Phineyj Sat 13-Oct-12 16:50:41

Oops, that wasn't a very good response to the actual question posted.

OP, I have a feeling you'd have to change society's reluctance to discuss this before the NHS would change the packs...personally I would rather know the odds and be informed but there does seem to be a 'lalala if they don't know what can go wrong, it won't' tendency...

Phineyj Sat 13-Oct-12 16:52:05

Oh the Bounty pack...as a former marketer that went straight in the bin -- I could see I'd end up getting junk mail from dozens of companies!!

GhostShip Sat 13-Oct-12 16:52:48

I think where some women would truly appreciate the information, on the other side a lot of women would be angry at it.

lotsofcheese Sat 13-Oct-12 17:44:11

I'm not sure... Most m/c happen before booking in appointments. And there is good information out there, particularly on the Internet. Plus NHS 24 etc.

It's one of these unfortunate situations where you don't need the information unless it happens to you.

It has to me, twice. I was given info at EPU & the staff were sensitive & informative. So that was adequate in my case. But I appreciate it's not the same for everyone.

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