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to not be too worried that DS cant write his name properly?

(14 Posts)
Loie159 Mon 08-Oct-12 17:02:01

DS is 5 in December and started school in September this year. He is engaged, loves looking at books, having stories read, really inquisitive (sp?) and loves to learn about things - clouds, animals, bugs, plants, dinosaurs etc etc..... However he really does seem that bothered about learning to write. He can write is name but in rather shakey writing and quite often says he doesnt want to if I ask him to put his name on a picture or card.

I never, ever force him at home, as my mum was very into "doing extra work at home after school" and quite determined for me and Dsis to acheive...... and it did my head in.

I personally am not that bothered as I think he will learn at school, and that learning can take all formats at home - it doesnt always have to be writing and numbers..... But several people including DM have commented to me now on how well their DD / DS can write and why cant my DS and I am starting to doubt my own philosphy! I just dont think kids should be forced to do something they dont want to when it comes to learning, esp at this age.

You only have a short part of your life when you can run round the garden covered in mud, and playing with woodlice and I just think at not even 5, I shouldnt be worried about if he can write......

AIBU to think that he will learn in his own time and as long as he enjoys "learning" thats what matters.

ChiefOwl Mon 08-Oct-12 17:05:45

It depends, I also believe in not doing 'extra' work, but I do support what they are learning outside school in a more fun way hopefully!

When is your first parents evening, I would bring it up then or have a chat to the school, you don't want him to fall behind his peers in reception imo

Indith Mon 08-Oct-12 17:14:25

YANBU and you sound fabulous.

Jenny70 Mon 08-Oct-12 17:14:34

I agree to a certain extent, but tempered by my eldest's experience, who was the same. Now at 9 (yr5) his ideas go so fast that his hand cannot keep up, and this is affecting his schoolwork. Basically his fine motor is behind his mind, by an increasing amount.

Youngest is same, and he started reception this year too. I am doing some fun doodling stuff (he loves mazes, spot diff & games of naughts&crosses) to try and encourage him. We will see if it makes any difference!

RubyFakeNails Mon 08-Oct-12 17:17:47

YANBU for a child of 5.

Its something to keep an eye on.

I thought DS would never read or write, which after DD who took to it all instantly was quite stressful, and then suddenly he just got it and is now in year 11 and top stream for all subjects.

Teamumizumi Mon 08-Oct-12 17:36:00

It depends if his name is Tarquin Fintim Limbim Ftang Ftang Ole Biscuit Barrell.

glamourousgranny42 Mon 08-Oct-12 17:48:21

I wouldn't worry. Don't force him because that's a sure way to turn him off. My son started reception not able to write a letter or recognise any words as he went to a lovely nursery that concentrated on learning through paly and a more holistic view of education. All his classmates went to nursery attached to the school and were given reading books in nursery. I always read to my son and he was very inquisitive. I let him set his own pace and now in year 7 he one of the best students in his year. He over took the nursery readers in a couple of months. Children develop at different paces at that age. Its more important that he enjoys learning. I'm a teacher btw!

GhostofMammaTJ Mon 08-Oct-12 17:50:20

YANBU, my DS started school on his 5th birthday, having not been interested at all in writing or even mark making. He is now 6 and in year one and doing very well. You cannot force them to do these things and indeed trying to will put them off. Let children be children!!

Loie159 Mon 08-Oct-12 19:12:45

Thank you all..... I do try really hard to make learning fun and if he asks me about anything always explain it to him. He loves music so I try to do musical things he enjoys and tons of reading. He just isn't that keen on actual writing! Like the idea if fun mark making and glad to know that others share my view. Thank you

Joiningthegang Mon 08-Oct-12 19:43:00

Mine is 5 later this month and cant either - just bot keen to do at hone - he will learn

Remember when people say " it doesnt matter when they learn to walk, they all do it at some point" i think the sane dor writing their name.

marbleslost Mon 08-Oct-12 20:08:44

I thought the same. I now have a year 2 dc who has a reading age of several years above, but struggles to write. There isn't that much time spent on writing. In hindsight, I'd be at least trying to get him to trace letters. It's not the same as learning to walk. They don't all naturally write. They won't just get up and do it. Neither can you rely on the teachers to do it.

My dd's year 2 teacher told me the other day - the problem is I have some that can add 32 to 84 and some who can't write their numbers to 10.

suebfg Mon 08-Oct-12 20:12:06

YANBU - I hate the thought of young kids being 'hot-housed'.

chandellina Mon 08-Oct-12 20:12:30

Mine is a bit younger, in reception, and nowhere near writing a recognisable letter or his name. His teacher set it as a target for this term and gave us some helpful ideas to make writing fun, like making a shopping list or writing a post card - even if it's just marks it can help them take an interest. Also stuff like writing in flour on the counter or a fogged window. I'm not too bothered either but I'm going to do what I can to encourage him.

Backtobedlam Mon 08-Oct-12 20:13:54

YANBU-I'm in the same position and feel exactly the same as you. I encourage fine motor skills in other ways but I'm not about to crush his enthusiasm for life by sitting him down and forcing him to write when he doesn't want to. I think reception year is as much about getting used to FT school, socialising, learning how to dress for PE etc as it is about reading and writing.

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