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Fucking PFBs, fuckers. I didn't think I was one until DS started nursery.

(15 Posts)
HowlingBitch Thu 06-Oct-11 22:20:44

My cats bum face and frowns are giving me wrinkles.

Though AIBU to think that MN has made me think twice about what the teachers are doing and how they handle the children?

DS is my PFB and only child. I'm royaly fucked when he goes to school aren't I?

ChippingIn Thu 06-Oct-11 22:21:38

Yep

HowlingBitch Thu 06-Oct-11 22:22:27

Arse biscuits.

ScaredBear Thu 06-Oct-11 22:22:50

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

verytellytubby Thu 06-Oct-11 22:24:31

Yes.

HowlingBitch Thu 06-Oct-11 22:25:43

I know!

Thankfully, I don't speak to them about it. I smile and bring empty milk bottles and cereal boxes for art.

Kick my arse please?

BOOareHaunting Thu 06-Oct-11 22:26:20

yep. My PFB and only DS is 7yo now and I still twitch a week before every parents evening.

HowlingBitch Thu 06-Oct-11 22:42:19

I just had my first parent teacher meeting! Hence the PFB worry. She said there is a possibility that DS could have ADHD and we cannot get him looked at until November.

He does have problems and I have had my suspicions but it just feels odd hearing it from a teacher. It was my first ever parent teacher meeting and I think we all dream of that perfect "He's a darling, His finger paintings resemble Picasso!" conversation but nothing really prepares you for ADHD.

aldiwhore Thu 06-Oct-11 22:56:22

That sucks HB but TRY to bear in mind that there's also a possibility he doesn't. Either way, it needs addressing huh? Though it must have floored you, and to be frank, that's not a PFB reaction, but a perfectly reasonable and understandable one.

Good luck, and by the way, he's still a darling either way. x

HowlingBitch Thu 06-Oct-11 23:03:06

Aldi you are a saint. Thanks I felt like an arse just then.

<sets up back lighting and a halo>

It did floor me. (I honestly imagined ADHD as something different, Which is wrong)

BOOareHaunting Fri 07-Oct-11 09:38:42

My first ever parents eve the teacher practically read a diary of events like:

@9.17am on 7th October the HT asked in assembly what the picture was of. DS answered 'tractor' without putting his hand up - we need to work on that.
@10.56am on 19th October DS pretended to sting another child with the bee puppets we have made and it made her cry.............

it went on and on hmm

My parting shot was: so has he just done these things once and stopped/ corrected his behaviour since - hence learnt and have you got anything positive to say about him?

It was yes and apparently not! (in that order!)

Sorry to hear about what the teacher said. I agree with Aldi he may not. It's 3 weeks into term and my story above shows some children don't settle as much as first but will respond to reminders.

Not being thread police but maybe post in special needs for advice of others who have been through this? Mostly best of luck and it is not PFB to feel like you do.

slavetofilofax Fri 07-Oct-11 09:47:00

Most teachers are lovely, and the sort of people that you would actively choose to have in your young child's life.

The classroom I work in is a really nice place for children to be. Their education is importand, but more important in my opinion, is their emotional development and happiness. If a teacher can help your child with that, then it's a wonderful thing.

Remember that the teacher wants the best for your child, I can understand exactly how you feel, its totally natural, not PFB, (my ds has AS) but the school sounds like it's on the ball when it comes to looking out for potential problems. And the earlier the better with things like this.

HowlingWereWolfBitch Sun 09-Oct-11 13:48:26

Hey thanks everyone, I think I will pop over to special needs and see if I can get some help.

The school are great. I couldn't of asked for a nicer bunch of people to look after my son!

thederkinsdame Sun 09-Oct-11 16:15:14

Have to say that it is unusual for them to be trying to pin a suspected dx on your child. Most teachers will just suggest you need a developmental check or to see your gp. Even if they suspect they are not medically qualified to make a dx, so I would mention this to them. They usually get outside agencies involved first.

WilsonFrickett Sun 09-Oct-11 16:22:55

Hey there, pop over to Special Needs and you'll find lots of people with similar concerns or worries, you'll be made to feel very welcome but I would also say teachers aren't qualified to make dxs (as thederkinsdame said) and if there are any issues they may well not be ADHD at all but something completely different. Has your DS just started the nursery, it's very early in the term as well and could really be settling in anxieties.

Make a list of the things that are concerning you, make an appointment with your doc and also go back to see the teacher, maybe with your DP to get more of a handle on the problems. Even is she's the best, most experienced teacher in the world (and some teachers are amazing, but others have had no training in this area) she shouldn't be just bandying terms like ADHD about.

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