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To send in shop brought samosas for Ramadhan?....

(59 Posts)
GaramMasalaGirl Sat 06-Aug-11 23:59:21

It's Ramadhaan right now and DD (19) works in a call centre where the other fasters bring in TONS of gorgeous yummy HOME-COOKED food. Although DD isn't fasting, she wants to join in and take some samosas into work. She has asked me to help her cook them but I just CBA to spend hours and hours cooking them.

I made a few just before the start of the month and stuck them in the freezer and as there's only me, DD & DS at home we don't normally need to cook massive quantities of food......so bearing in mind that they'll probably taste better just as good as my homemade ones, would it be awful to send in some shop brought samosas? 

DD thinks I'm BU and not getting into the spirit of Ramadhaan (being charitable, selfless etc etc) and is now not talking to me! 

So what do you all think?  (it's my first post here so please be gentle)

squeakytoy Sun 07-Aug-11 00:00:41

make some.. you know they will taste nicer really smile

curlyredhair Sun 07-Aug-11 00:02:17

I think it's fine, no-one will know and surely the point is to take something? If your dd feels that strongly, tell her to make them.

LordOfTheFlies Sun 07-Aug-11 00:03:29

Can you do some savoury rice to serve cold?
If you've got the vegetables for samosas then you can use them.

LauraIngallsWilder Sun 07-Aug-11 00:04:42

If she doesnt want to take shop bought samosas - she could make them herself. (as that would be a charitable act, saving you the bother!) grin

Sewmuchtodo Sun 07-Aug-11 00:04:56

Marks and Sparks make some fab ones, pop them in a pretty tin and no one will know wink

That way you can spend time thinking up what charitable things you can do instead of cooking!

Pishwife Sun 07-Aug-11 00:05:24

I think if DD wants to take treats into work, at 19 she can buy & make them herself!

worraliberty Sun 07-Aug-11 00:06:00

I think your 'darling' daughter should make them herself.

Why does she expect you to make them if she wants to bring them to work? confused

Sit on a comfy chair in the kitchen, with a nice book, put your feet up and supervise her making them. I see no reason why you should be making them for her, and if she wants home cooked ones, well then she knows where the stove is...

kim111 Sun 07-Aug-11 00:11:08

I used to work in a call centre and at least half the people bringing in food bought it rather than made it themselves, they got it from Indian shops rather than M&S, Sainsburys etc though. No one seemed to mind smile

squeakytoy Sun 07-Aug-11 00:13:36

In fairness, OP did say her daughter had asked for help, not for OP to just make them...

Not sure why it would take hours though. I can whip up a dozen of them in about half an hour smile

Pishwife Sun 07-Aug-11 00:13:40

TBH at a bring & share I tend to prefer the shop-bought things.

A home-cooked rice salad that had been sitting at room temperature would give me the shivers.

GaramMasalaGirl Sun 07-Aug-11 00:16:30

DD is actually quite a good cook better than me but she's not quite that organised yet and hasn't yet learned to clean as she goes along which means the kitchen will end up looking like a bomb site!!

Laura I didn't even think about flipping the "charitable act" argument....good thinking

LynetteScavo Sun 07-Aug-11 00:19:45

If she wants to take in samosas, tell her to clean make them and clean teh kitchen herself...she's hardly a baby!

Or buy them in from a reputable local shop....ne one will know you didn't make them.

worraliberty Sun 07-Aug-11 00:25:12

She's 19 and hasn't learnt to clean yet? confused

Back away now OP...either let her buy them or show her how to cook them and 'learn' to clean after herself.

Blimey, at 19 some women are married with a few children.

Thruaglassdarkly Sun 07-Aug-11 00:31:07

Sorry, your 19 yo DD is not talking to YOU because YOU wouldn't "enter into the spirit of Ramadam" (I assuming she's a muslim to want to enter into the spirit of a faith, as faiths are taken pretty seriously by their adherants and are not just something to opt in and out of because everyone else is celebrating it) by making home-made samosas????

Sorry, but she should be making her own if she feels that strongly.

Why would you even think for a second that YABU, because she is and you most certainly are not!

GaramMasalaGirl Sun 07-Aug-11 00:38:03

Worra- yup, I'd been married off and got preggers at 19!!

TBF I haven't really made much of a culinary effort thus far for Ramadhan, most people I know are having elaborate and lavish feasts every day! So I guess I'm feeling guilty that when DCs do fast I just stick a pot of curry and rice in front of them!

HerBeX Sun 07-Aug-11 00:45:41

I'm a bit puzzled by this. Why are they taking food to work when they're supposed to be fasting? Is it because they do shifts and therefore are working at the time when they're allowed to eat?

If so, I'd buy some, then get a rolling pin and distress them a bit so they look rough and ready home-made. Your DD will never know...

Failing that, why don't you just give her the ones from the freezer?

worraliberty Sun 07-Aug-11 00:47:44

Well you either do it or you don't in your house?

If you don't, that's your decision and no need for guilt...it can't be done in half measures or there's no point to it at all.

It's like giving up something for Lent...but then having a bit of it and giving it up again before having a bit more.

If you are no religious enough to do it properly and your daughter just wants to 'get into the spirit of it' that's understandable...but as a grown adult, she doesn't need to be involving you.

scottishmummy Sun 07-Aug-11 00:53:04

if dd so bothered she can make samosa.home made like a goddess
otherwise sainsbo finest will suffice

GaramMasalaGirl Sun 07-Aug-11 00:57:08

HerBeX she works the late shift and the fasts don't break until 9.00 in the evening. The company are very accommodating and allow the fasters to take their break around that time so they can shovel as much food down as they can eat

The ones in the freezer are MINE for the DCs when I cba haven't got time to cook a proper meal and can make their post fast meal of pasta a bit more special by bunging them a few somosas

greenbananas Sun 07-Aug-11 01:03:29

Does your daughter work a night shift? I'm confused - I thought Ramadan was for fasting between sunrise and sundown, and that all the yummy home-cooked food was exchanged at Eid (celebratory day at the end of Ramadan)...

I don't think buying samosas etc. is a problem at all - after all, your daughter has presumably not been raised to make tons of home cooked food from scratch. However, you/your daughter will need to make sure that that any food she takes in is Halal - I'm not sure if supermarket brands are Halal but no doubt the packaging will enlighten you.

greenbananas Sun 07-Aug-11 01:05:25

(sorry, cross posts about the night shift)

HerHissyness Sun 07-Aug-11 01:07:53

Are samosas eaten during ramadan? I only ask cos in Egypt snacks like falafel were not available at all until after eid as (apprently) they make you thirsty.

GaramMasalaGirl Sun 07-Aug-11 01:29:28

GB - yes you're right, fasting is between sunrise and sundown and although the focus during the month isn't meant to be on food for some reason the obsession becomes....FOOD ( dieters might be able to identify with this). All the conversations revolve around....FOOD. 

And you're right about Eid as well, it does involve the exchange of.....FOOD! I don't know why we cant just keep and eat our own food rather than make tons and tons and send it round to everyone else.

HerHissy - haven't ever heard that about samosas, other foods yes but not samosas.

I used to fast (not so religious anymore) and the worst thing I did was glug down a whole bottle of coke, very satisfying for the 1st 10 minutes, not so much after then!

I quite like HerBeX's idea of distressing shop brought ones.....if only to keep the peace

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