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people have a problem with reins, but why?

(149 Posts)
strandedbear Sun 19-Jun-11 14:01:31

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

MrsKravitz Sun 19-Jun-11 14:04:14

Why dont you hold her hand?

ShowOfHands Sun 19-Jun-11 14:05:03

People on MN aren't. This is one of the MN Perennials and about 99.9% of MNers think there's nothing wrong with them at all and in fact they're a marvellous thing when you've got a bolter.

I personally don't like them. I absolutely cannot tell you why but I limit my opinion to my own choices. I don't judge people who use them in the slightest and rationally I understand them completely. Ditto dummies. They're just not things I would want to use and therefore I don't.

Iggly Sun 19-Jun-11 14:05:30

We have reins.

And a back pack.

Oh if only I could just hold DS's hand... He of 20 months and fast of foot. Plus he's little so it's probably uncomfortable for him to walk with his arm up for any length of time.

MrsKravitz Sun 19-Jun-11 14:06:18

Same as showofhands i would never use them but.....each to his own/ whatever...

strandedbear Sun 19-Jun-11 14:07:06

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

MrsKravitz Sun 19-Jun-11 14:07:48

<remembers she is s short arse>

Iggly Sun 19-Jun-11 14:10:00

For people who held their DC's hands. What age did you let them walk without a pushchair along busy roads?

noddyholder Sun 19-Jun-11 14:11:08

I love them smile

MrsKravitz Sun 19-Jun-11 14:14:35

I honestly cant remember iggly but I never used reigns and mine hated his pushchair

MoonGirl1981 Sun 19-Jun-11 14:14:39

I don't like them either; they remind me of dog leads.

Sorry!!

Just hold their hand.

fedupofnamechanging Sun 19-Jun-11 14:16:28

I have always used reins for my DC when they were little.

T people who say it's treating a child like an animal, I take the view that people put leads on their dogs because they love them enough not to want them to dash out into the road and get run over. Why would you take less care of your child than someone would of their dog?

Yes, you can hold hands, but it only takes a second for a child to tug free and dash into the road. Very small children have no concept of road safety and until they develop it, a parent has to take extra care and think for them.

bibbitybobbityhat Sun 19-Jun-11 14:18:24

I know! Ridiculous isn't it?

What if you need both hands to push a pram, or carry shopping, or hold the hands of another child , or pay for something in a shop, or push the open door button on a train.

Sometimes I find the prissiness on Mumsnet completely unbearable.

Cyclebump Sun 19-Jun-11 14:21:49

My parents used them when we were small as we were bolters and we travelled a lot so it was a bit of a mare getting us through airports. They frequently went abroad with all three of us and, with a 6ft 7" dad, he coukdnt stoop to hold a hand the whole time and mum's hands were full.

I can't say I'm scarred by the experience and if my son is of the same runaway tendencies I'll be open to using them.

emmspemms Sun 19-Jun-11 14:22:48

We used reins, they are great, we used to make neeeiiigh noises and pretend to be ponies . Very funny walking round town . Clip Clop.

LyingWitchInTheWardrobe Sun 19-Jun-11 14:24:12

I had lovely reins as a kid... red and blue they were, leather. I doubt they'd fit now but I really needed them then. smile

GingerWrath Sun 19-Jun-11 14:24:25

I used them by they were more annoying than anything else once DD discovered she could take her weight of her legs and use them to spin round when she was bored or stop dead when she didn't want to go somewhere!

DogsBestFriend Sun 19-Jun-11 14:24:43

What bibbity said. If you have a younger child/baby in a pushchair or pram you are unable to hold the elder one's hands. Ditto carrying bags of shopping, walking the dogs and a myriad of other things.

I was one such parent. It seems that some people would prefer that I had put snobbery ahead of my daughter's safety. hmm

LDNmummy Sun 19-Jun-11 14:25:31

I think reins are an excellent idea and I plan on using one. It's a mental association of them being used for animals that people cannot get over. Frankly I care more about making it easier to keep my child safe than what others think.

Mumbrane Sun 19-Jun-11 14:25:32

'Just hold their hand' ha ha

I wish that had worked with my DS when he was a toddler. He was a 'bolter'. he would just suddenly wriggle free and run off. This was aged 2-3 yrs old, and to be honest, there was no reasoning with him. I just HAD to keep him safe at all costs.

I didn't actually use reins in the end, because they didn't work for us either (I was more a 'hold them down and forcibly strap them into the buggy if they don't play ball' type of mum) but reins are so obviously practical and useful for many parents and children, that I can't imagine why people are so against them.

I also find the 'treating them like animals' argument very weak.

microfight Sun 19-Jun-11 14:25:32

I don't understand why people don't like them either. I get on the tube with my DS and I can tell you getting off at say Oxford circus I think they are brilliant. I DO hold hands but have the lead around my wrist too as back up. It's easy enough to lose an adult in busy central London let alone a child whose head becomes lost amongst the sea of legs. A few pushes and shoves and we are easily separated.
We don't use a buggy as I think it's far better for children to walk where possible so reins are fab in very busy places.

zukiecat Sun 19-Jun-11 14:27:44

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Dred Sun 19-Jun-11 14:28:30

Oh FGS! It's not like they're wearing a collar!

wildfig Sun 19-Jun-11 14:28:37

Can you get extending reins, like an extending dog lead? [mental image of toddlers being whooshed backwards away from temptation]

siilk Sun 19-Jun-11 14:29:26

I had reins for ds1. A true bolter. I was heavily pg and just couldn't catch him. Was the only way I could cope. We don't use them anymore as ds1 has learnt not to run. However he will still on occasion ask to wear the backpack part to take toys around. I think they serve a purpose.

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