Talk

Advanced search

Mumsnet has not checked the qualifications of anyone posting here. If you have any medical concerns we suggest you consult your GP.

how can my ds sleep in his own room with excema?

(9 Posts)
keresley Sun 12-Jun-05 22:03:35

My 6 month old ds has had severe excema for the last 4 months. He still shares a room with us and we would like to transfer him to his own room. However, I don't know how we will ever be able to transfer him as we have to constantly be with him so he doesn't scratch himself to death at night. Has anyone got a child with excema that has successfully transferred thm to their own room?? Advice needed!
PS- tries all remedies- creams, scratch mits, excema suits, air conditioners to keep him cool etc

Frizbe Sun 12-Jun-05 22:05:35

Have you tried the alternative medicine thread on here somewhere, someone added some sort of sulpher thingy to their dd's diet, I read a few days ago and it completley cured her? just a thought, I wish you all the best.

HOLLY5 Mon 13-Jun-05 17:10:02

i too am in exactly the same situation - my son actually even sleeps in my bed as holding him is the only way to keep him asleep

Chandra Mon 13-Jun-05 17:45:59

Well, the only way he won't scratch himself at night is if the eczema is controlled or he's having some medicine to reduce the itching but GPs are not keen on prescribing them and to be referred to a dermatologist you will need to get your child with all his skin removed so they believe you really need to see a dermatologist and not only aqueous cream and fresh air.

If I have to go through eczema again I will spend the money in seeing a dermatologist. The problem can be solved, in some occassions, in days.Unfortunately the solution is to apply emolliens more often or stronger ones. In our case the one that had really worked (though I know it may be different for other kids) were Eucerin 10% urea, Aveeno with menthol (for the cooler months) and end of the story. Oh, and good old diprobase for the days the skin is cracked and the other creams sting (though you will need to apply it far more often thant the other creams)

HTH

Chandra Mon 13-Jun-05 17:50:19

BTW. Our dermatologist asked us not to make a lot of fuss about his eczema, he said that if they perceive that you are disapointed/angry/frustrated/etc. at it, the child perceives it as if there was something very wrong with him that leads to stress and therefore more flares. So, getting a good baby nail clipper is a must, specially during the summer when you need to clip them every second day.

HOLLY5 Mon 13-Jun-05 18:57:44

my son actually saw Dr Atherton at great ormond street last week and has been in wet wraps for 3 days now 24hrs a day and the improvement is amazing. He does not appear to have any eczema however is still itchy.

I am just hoping this remains after the bandages come off and we use them less.

Podmog Mon 13-Jun-05 19:30:06

Message withdrawn

Gillian76 Mon 13-Jun-05 19:32:40

We did the wet wraps too. Very effective. The key is keeping the skin moisturised once the angry patches have calmed down. 50/50 was the most effective for us in that respect. Really icky though!

Nixz Mon 13-Jun-05 19:46:02

i also did the wet wraps but my ds found them more irritating and she became so frustrated. Ds is 4 years old now and has suffered with moderate to severe excema for all her little life, night times are especially bad as their skin heats up causing more irritation. The only things i find that work are, cool rooms (central heating causes havoc, diprobase/doublebase etc also appear to cause more irritation when scratching as they 'sit' on the skin which make the itching worse (my ds finds this so do i as i also have some excema)an antihistamine and finding a suitable moisturiser. I contacted the exema organisation and they sent me a booklet on coping with exema at night and gave me some really good advice. I think scratching becomes a habit at times and although i dont think taking medication to stop the itching is a good idea longterm, it may help short term. Good luck - its all about trial and error.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now