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Chocolate Allergy?

(9 Posts)
Groovermum Mon 14-Sep-09 21:27:56

My toddler seems to have a chocolate allergy which we've managed to date by just not giving it to him. He has an almost gag reaction - instantly throws up. Not pleasant but doesn't seem to upset him too much.

Recently however he had a very different and more upsetting reaction to a tiny amount of chocolate ice-cream - hives, clammy, sick and then terribly distressed. My doctor gave me Piriton on prescription and suggested I research chocolate allergies. Research to date seems to say it's not the cocoa but the something in the chocolate, usually dairy or gluten. He has no problems with either of these so I'm really perplexed. Concerned that it was something else in the icecream? Any ideas?

thanks

alypaly Tue 15-Sep-09 00:23:18

there is egg in some of the more expensive brands of ice cream

tatt Tue 15-Sep-09 08:47:22

most ice-cream is made in factories using nuts and/or contains peanut protein. Much chocolate is made in factories using nuts. So unless he's regularly and happily eating a range of nuts I'd suggest a request for a referral and tests for nut allergy.

Can you check the containers /chocolate bars to see if they mention nuts? If you felt brave you could try him with kinnerton chocolate (which is nut free). Nut allergy is much more likely than chocolate allergy, I'm afraid.

tatt Tue 15-Sep-09 08:49:25

forgot - same applies to ice-cream, especially chocolate. They are all problem foods for the nut allergic. Egg isn't usually in chocolate. Sorry - looks like you may be joining the nut allergy club. However they may outgrow problems. Should still get them tested though.

tatt Thu 17-Sep-09 08:02:04

Do hope you have seen this and have been able to arrange testing with your gp. You really need to be areful toa void the may contain nuts items. It would also be wise to have liquid piriton with you. If your child eats a whole nut they may react badly.

cityangel Sun 20-Sep-09 02:21:40

I don't think its very helpful for your doctor to tell you to go away and research chocolate allergies. It's their role to ensure qualified investigation identifies whether your child has a life threatening allergy or not.

I am 33 and allergic to chocolate. I haven't eaten it since I was a young child.
I was diagnosed with abdominal migraine caused by the amino acid Tyramine. I would vomit profusely but didn't have an allergic reaction worthy of piriton etc eg. no anaphylaxis

I can eat nuts/ dairy & gluten & everything else. They told me tyramine is in cheese and red wine. I don't have red wine but love cheese.

I have been told I have probably grown out of it now. Which I think is probably the case, but I have no desire to find out as I make up for it with sweets and white wine

Just something worth considering as part of your investigation.

Groovermum Mon 28-Sep-09 21:53:59

Thanks for some interesting posts. It's not nuts, he's had peanuts with no problems and is also ok with eggs. Cityangel, I'll definitely follow up on your tyramine as it sounds just like our syptoms

tinytalker Mon 28-Sep-09 22:32:40

Groovermum, don't discount nuts because your ds can tolerate peanuts. Any 1 nut can cause a severe reaction. My dd was negative for all types of nuts except Hazelnuts.
And I have a friend whose dd is fine with all nuts except cashews.

tatt Tue 29-Sep-09 08:40:01

great that it's not peanut or eggs. However he needs a referral to someone who can properly test him. Hives and clammy can be the first signs of a very serious reaction. Babies do often vomit and recover but it's not something to rely on, especially as they get older and are less likely to vomit it up.

Tinytalker is quite right to say a tree nut could still be an issue but whatever it is you need professional advice and testing, this is not something you should test for at home.

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