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Dairy alternatives while weaning

(15 Posts)
ilovetosleep Mon 03-Nov-14 09:04:51

Hi, I'm waiting on a dietician referral but in the meantime I wondered if anyone could advise me on what to use in cooking etc for my 7mo DS.

I have been expressing for porridge etc but quite often I stay in bed while DH does breakfast so this morning he did porridge in calcium fortified rice milk. Is this ok? He's feeding A LOT at night so I'm not too worried about calcium yet, but obv would like to drop a feed or two at some point! Should I get neocate and use that in cooking instead?

What about yoghurt - it was so easy weaning DS1 to just give him a yoghurt once a day which he loved. This time around I have given coconut milk yoghurt which he loves but is not fortified so I think its empty calories IYKWIM? Should I stop giving that?

I would rather avoid the whole formula thing if possible, it just seems pointless to me to start faffing with all that when I intend to let DS self wean. But obv I want him to be getting most nutrition possible. Can't use soya either btw. I use almond milk or oat milk but neither of them are enriched either.

thanks in advance

ilovepowerhoop Mon 03-Nov-14 10:00:02

I wouldn't use rice milk as it isnt advised for under 5's due to arsenic levels. If you are planning on dropping some breastfeeds then formula would be the preferred milk to give as it has the correct nutrients for that age of baby.

izzybizzybuzzybees Mon 03-Nov-14 10:11:51

Oat milk is probably your best bet as it's safe for little ones. As mentioned above rice milk isn't advised until 5 years old. Our son is dairy, milk and egg allergic. We use:
Oat or soya milk
Pure spread to replace butter
Soya yoghurt, most own brand are low fat which isn't great for babies so alpro usually.
Vegan cheese

Everything else is just a case of reading labels thoroughly. There are plenty of fingers foods available milk free. It depends what kind of thing you're after!

izzybizzybuzzybees Mon 03-Nov-14 10:12:35

Oh and you can get oat milk with calcium etc. Our tesco has a huge selection!

izzybizzybuzzybees Mon 03-Nov-14 10:13:38

Just realised my advice is useless as I missed the soya part. At 7 months if you need to stop feeds it'll need to be neocate sad

ilovetosleep Mon 03-Nov-14 12:48:12

Fuck fuck fuck, arsenic? He had it in porridge this morning. (First time) I thought the only thing they couldn't have was honey before 1?!

When I say dropping milk feeds I don't mean replacing with another milk, I just meant suoplementin cooking with milk ie in mash potato etc. web j referred to skipping milk feeds I just meant as a result of more solids being consumed, as would normally happen.

Freaking out about the rice milk now.

Gileswithachainsaw Mon 03-Nov-14 12:53:15

KOKO coconut milk.is good for porridge.

Don't worry about rice milk just don't give him any more.

I use med dairy free spread. They do a soya free one.
You can get yogurts that are made from pea protein so are soya and dairy free. Or co-yo (sp? ) that are coconut based.

Don't bother with vegan cheese it's vile.

Gileswithachainsaw Mon 03-Nov-14 12:53:29

M&s

ilovetosleep Mon 03-Nov-14 12:56:39

Co-yo is what we have. - he loves it, I just wondered if it was one of those things that fills them up without actually offering anything nutritionally. A bit like baby rice! Coconut yoghurt is not fortified with anything although I suppose it's all good fats... Does it have protein?

Gileswithachainsaw Mon 03-Nov-14 12:58:55

Tbh I wouldn't worry about if it has protein. At 7 months it's all just a taster anyway. He wouldn't be eating enough to impact on him alot.

As long as he's getting his milk he should be fine.

ilovetosleep Mon 03-Nov-14 13:03:26

Yes I'm sure you're right. Feeling a bit lost with it all as not a lot of support from doctor and I've never had any allergies in the family so always been a free for all with food. And we're all pretty big food lovers so I find this hard! Am worried about DS1 feeding ds2 from his plate, yet I don't want to deprive him of all his fave things!

anotherdayanothersquabble Mon 03-Nov-14 13:07:39

Don't 'freak out' about the rice milk, it may be wise not have it as a main source of milk, however, do be aware that there is arsenic in all rice products including in organic baby rice.

For calcium, look at alternative sources of calcium, bone broth, sesame, leafy greens, broccoli stems, etc.

Gileswithachainsaw Mon 03-Nov-14 13:12:34

There's no reason why meals can't be suitable for all. It doesn't have to mean Constantly making too lots of stuff. What are your ds' s fave things?

Cakes and biscuits can easily be home made instead of shop bought. And may dairy free. Keep his yogurts for school so there's no risk of cross feeding. Have a few things in the freezer for when your ds fancies something cheesy.

But things like omlettes can be made with a milk alternative and no one will notice. Pasta and tomato based sauces, home made soups are all easy to do with no milk and then the baby can shove a handful in his mouth to try with no problem.

Switch the margarine for everyone, and porridge with the milk alternative tastes fine too. Almond milk porridge is nice.

anotherdayanothersquabble Mon 03-Nov-14 13:13:07

I found this book useful for sources of nutritional: Lucy Burney

It is out of date with regards to baby led weaning etc but still has valuable information. Only available used as it is out of print.

pashmina696 Mon 03-Nov-14 14:35:07

another useful thing is tofutti - the individual tubs which come in a box are soya free too - it is a good alternative to soft cheese, DS2 finds the cheesly cheese alternative perfectly fine when melted, like on pizza.

tesco do a fresh coconut milk in their free from brand which is also calcium fortified and suitable from 6 months.

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