Afghan refugees started dd school

(159 Posts)
onedancetwostep Thu 25-Nov-21 16:01:16

How would you feel?
How would you make them feel welcome?

OP’s posts: |
OnceuponaRainbow18 Thu 25-Nov-21 16:03:33

Treat them as you would any other person.

Sirzy Thu 25-Nov-21 16:03:59

The same as I would any other children? Encourage my child to be welcoming and polite to them.

If they have any questions encourage them to talk to you about it and if needed read a book like Boy at the back of the class together

Choice4567 Thu 25-Nov-21 16:04:05

Why would I feel anything? What are you hoping from this?

Samcro Thu 25-Nov-21 16:04:08

why would you not?

Eastridingclub Thu 25-Nov-21 16:04:45

Do you mean how would you feel if you were them because you want to make them feel welcome?

Saucery Thu 25-Nov-21 16:05:56

I’d feel “oh, that’s nice, more children to benefit from our lovely school’s caring, nurturing ethos!”
We’d welcome them as we do all our families, with friendship and support.

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Bunce1 Thu 25-Nov-21 16:07:04

You should read the children’s book the boy at the back of the class.

I would be delighted they came and would want to make them feel very welcome and part of our community.

Sh05 Thu 25-Nov-21 16:07:11

No different than any other child and depending on the age of your child I'm sure they'll treat them as they would any other new child.
How do you feel op?

NovemberWitch Thu 25-Nov-21 16:07:52

Play.
Games that don’t need language.

Charliealphatangorara Thu 25-Nov-21 16:11:42

We had a syrian refugee child start our school in about year 3. He had an interpreter that came in weekly at first, who mainly worked with him one to one but also was there to liaise between him and the staff (possibly small groups of children though I never saw that). 6 months later, through the power of playing with his peers, he could speak excellent English. The children didn't see his lack of English as a reason to not include him. Hopefully the children in your DCs school will do the same.

Hen2018 Thu 25-Nov-21 16:25:26

I’m not sure my children would think to inform me.

I presume that, as it would be illegal for them to work at first, I would ask if they wanted anything (second hand furniture, gluts of food etc).

Iamthemaid Thu 25-Nov-21 16:26:51

I would be so happy they are here and hopefully safe. I would try and talk to the parent/carers welcome them welcome.

jerometheturnipking Thu 25-Nov-21 16:28:56

NovemberWitch

Play.
Games that don’t need language.

1000x this.

I also second reading the Boy at the Back of the Class.

Tomliboosrule Thu 25-Nov-21 16:32:13

There is a Syrian refugee in my daughters year 5 class. He has picked up English amazingly and all the children love him and think he is hilarious. He is one of my daughters best friends.

Saladcreamormayo Thu 25-Nov-21 16:35:20

you'd treat them just as you would any other child who had just joined the school, must be so scary for them particularly if they don't speak English.
what would annoy me though is if locals who have lived in the community for many years cannot get school places for their children and refugees are given priority and get the school place instead.

TinyTear Thu 25-Nov-21 16:35:40

we think there is a Syrian refugee in my DD's class but we don't know any details.

i think that is great as the girl is there standing on merit - not 'the refugee'

the kids don't know it, and the parents don't know it... just some gossip happened that meant I checked some details with my DD.

i wouldn't be happy with the big announcements "here come the refugees" - let kids be kids...

but we have a very international school and it's normal to have foreign kids start with no english at first

Soontobe60 Thu 25-Nov-21 16:36:21

I’m not sure I understand where you’re coming from. Do you think you should be approaching these children in the playground to ask if they need anything? Or their parents? TBH, that sounds quite patronising.
Far better to find out if there a local charity supporting refugees specifically and make donations to them rather than approaching individuals directly.
The school I teach in has Afghan refugees, but also has refugees from many other countries. We do fundraising but not for specific groups of refugees. Any support of a practical / financial nature is done via our welfare team and is very discrete.
I’d suggest that you make an effort to say hello to the parents on the playground and ask the school if there’s anything you can do to support them.

Soontobe60 Thu 25-Nov-21 16:38:54

Saladcreamormayo

you'd treat them just as you would any other child who had just joined the school, must be so scary for them particularly if they don't speak English.
what would annoy me though is if locals who have lived in the community for many years cannot get school places for their children and refugees are given priority and get the school place instead.

Really? That’s so welcoming of you!
Here little refugees who’ve had to flee your country with your parents to avoid prison / murder / other abuse from the taliban, you can come to our school but only if you don’t get in the way of the kids that have lived here all their lives and don’t want to go to the school down the road…

dworky Thu 25-Nov-21 16:46:05

I would tell my children that these pupils had been through a very hard time & to be as kind as possible to them.

Sleeplessem Thu 25-Nov-21 16:46:16

Saladcreamormayo

you'd treat them just as you would any other child who had just joined the school, must be so scary for them particularly if they don't speak English.
what would annoy me though is if locals who have lived in the community for many years cannot get school places for their children and refugees are given priority and get the school place instead.

Fuuuuuuccck that’s a dismal way to look at things. Of course their level of English is going to be low (at first) they are refugee children fleeing from a war torn country. Children are incredible, they will pick up English (or any other second language) far faster than any adult could and for the time they need extra support they’ll have a translator, so for the life of me can’t work out what your problem is, besides racism.

OP how would I feel? Glad that those children are safe and will be getting a good education. How would I make them feel welcome? Encourage children to play with them, make sure to include them at bday parties/ social events and make sure those events were adequately catered (ie halal).

KittenKong Thu 25-Nov-21 16:57:25

I’d ask my kid about them - discuss how they much be feeling (‘imagine having to leave your home and start somewhere else’).

If English skills aren’t all that, maybe volunteer to read with them. I did this at DS school - we had quite a few who spoke no or very little English, and this could cause behaviour problems as they can get frustrated at not being able to make themselves understood - but they caught up. One boy was a holy terror (fast with his fists with the other children), and I’d just sit and read to him and show him picture books. Him eventually brought on his own photo album to show me pics of his mum who he hadn’t seen for months because she was working in camps back home - the poor kid wasn’t a terror - he was just a wee boy who missed his mum.

Don’t try to force friendships - they are just kids after all - but remind your kids of being considerate and kind. Involve them in the usual school/kid stuff (parties, fairs, charity drives) and speak to the parents at the school gates - even if it’s just a hello, or invite to a coffee. Tell them if they ever need anything to just ask.

PlantyPotts Thu 25-Nov-21 17:03:45

I think I'd have a chat with my child about what refugee children may have faced. And ask them to think about how scary it must feel to start at a new school in a new language in a new country in a new culture. I'd want to instill in them the idea that a smile or a hello or a wave can make all the difference.

CapBarnacles Thu 25-Nov-21 17:09:36

I'd just feel so relived that the child had made it to a school here. Thank goodness. Couldn't be happier, but also sad for those who didn't make it.

sunnyandshare Thu 25-Nov-21 17:10:30

We had quite a number of Syrian refugees at our primary school. Some of the mums in conjuction with HT organized a coffee morning to invite the mums to break the ice and try to make them feel welcome. I set up a WhatsApp group for them to ask any school related questions (mostly using Google translate) and what they found most useful was help with the homework tasks.

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