Please can someone explain prams / bassinets to me?

(26 Posts)
GlobeUs Mon 11-Jan-21 09:32:20

I'm due to have IVF (now delayed) but to keep me sane, and keep hopeful, I have started to look at baby-related things.

What.A.Minefield.

I was looking at prams and I have tried the Bumbleride Era which completely suits my needs for being off roady, comfortable and big. One of the things I liked about it is that it's parent facing and you don't need to have the bassinet from birth.

I was then looking for something to use in airports, layovers and connections to and from the airport and I came across a few options. However, all of them state you need the bassinet attachment from birth which completely defeats the purpose as you cannot take the bassinet in the cabin.

Is there a reason why I cannot use the Bumbleride Infant insert this product in another near lie-flat pram to make it safe for a newborn?

I am not sure if the bassinet options are a money making option, or if there is a real safety element to using those above an infant insert in a Cabin-allowed pram?

I did go to a major retailer between lockdown 1 and 2 and try out a few options - they were very insistent that the way to go was to get a mountain buggy and bugaboo combination, or straight bugaboo combinations, but with all the bassinets, attachments, accessories, it came out very expensive.

I have ages to keep looking but I just cannot understand if I am missing something with the bassinet and insert bit at this stage (this is a really steep learning curve!)

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GlobeUs Mon 11-Jan-21 11:52:41

Hopeful bump on this one.

OP’s posts: |
MinnieMountain Mon 11-Jan-21 12:41:16

I’m not sure. We first flew with DS when he was 4 months old. He was either on a lap or in a sling for the flight. The buggy went in the hold.

Boysarebackintown Mon 11-Jan-21 15:42:56

I’m old but I thinking flying until they can sit unaided your have to book a sky cot type thing . Then once they sit up can be in your knee or have own seat with a car seat.
Babies who can’t sit surely need to lie flat?

GlobeUs Mon 11-Jan-21 15:51:43

Sorry, I meant in the pram - not on the airline. Why is that some prams you can put an insert in the seat section, but then when the seat is similar incline in other prams they say you must buy the bassinet attachment for the pram.

Apologies I was not clear in my post but I am talking about actual prams, not on the plane.

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Aroundtheworldin80moves Mon 11-Jan-21 15:57:09

How likely are you to fly with an under 6month old?
The pushchair has to lie completly flat to be certified for under 6months (or maybe a slight incline).
For the airport I always found baby carriers more practical... Especially if there are stairs and escalators involved.

katand2kits Mon 11-Jan-21 15:58:05

When your baby is small, a sling is the easiest way to get them around the airport. If you have a small buggy that folds in one piece, you can usually keep that until you board. I had a bigger pram for at home and a small cheap buggy for travel.

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GlobeUs Mon 11-Jan-21 15:59:15

@Aroundtheworldin80moves Very likely - and multiple times as well.

I thought about the baby carrier but how does that work with long lay overs, airport transfers, other baggage and delays?

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Ohalrightthen Mon 11-Jan-21 16:02:34

GlobeUs

*@Aroundtheworldin80moves* Very likely - and multiple times as well.

I thought about the baby carrier but how does that work with long lay overs, airport transfers, other baggage and delays?

You would generally not do any of that with a newborn, it would be an absolute nightmare unless you had a couple of people to help you.

But a sling would be easier for travel as it is compact and handsfree.

MustardMitt Mon 11-Jan-21 16:04:05

I think you should be checking with your preferred airline rather than the buggy company. I never had a bassinet for a pram but then I never had to fly!

MinnieMountain Mon 11-Jan-21 16:04:55

We cradled DS on our laps. He had a baby seat belt like the adult one that linked to ours.

GlobeUs Mon 11-Jan-21 16:05:31

@Ohalrightthen not a brand new newborn, but from six - eight weeks - then yes (assuming no complications / health issues etc.), it would be essential.

I do have some scope to choose where I go though so can mix long haul destinations with short haul and spread out further if need be.

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Aroundtheworldin80moves Mon 11-Jan-21 16:07:29

GlobeUs

*@Aroundtheworldin80moves* Very likely - and multiple times as well.

I thought about the baby carrier but how does that work with long lay overs, airport transfers, other baggage and delays?

It's a lot easier when your pushchair isn't returned to you at the gate, unless you mean one of those that folds up for an overhead locker.

Ohalrightthen Mon 11-Jan-21 16:09:41

GlobeUs

*@Ohalrightthen* not a brand new newborn, but from six - eight weeks - then yes (assuming no complications / health issues etc.), it would be essential.

I do have some scope to choose where I go though so can mix long haul destinations with short haul and spread out further if need be.

Will you be alone? You will certainly need a pram with a bassinet, if you're planning on taking a pram. Babies that small need to be completely flat on a firm mattress, the inserts aren't suitable for more than 40min or so.

I really wouldn't travel abroad with an unvaccinated baby, can it not wait til 16 weeks?

GlobeUs Mon 11-Jan-21 16:17:18

the inserts aren't suitable for more than 40min or so.

Ok thank you - this is the info I was looking for, it just feels like different pram companies say different things. Clearly I need to get a bassinet!

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Notgotanyidea Mon 11-Jan-21 16:17:51

We had got second hand cheap, basic pushchairs when we flew (4, 16 and 19 months old) one was never seen again and two were broken in transit!

ShyTown Mon 11-Jan-21 16:18:15

The YoYo folds to typical cabin size dimensions in both newborn and 6 months+ mode. I travelled a lot when DD was a baby and it was a god send. On the odd occasion it doesn’t fit in the overhead like if it’s a mini regional plane but this has only ever happened to me twice- once Swiss Air shoved it under the seats on an empty row and I once had to gate check it on an internal flight to Albany, NY. But other than that it’s fantastic for travel and is also a really good urban stroller - we use it daily and are about to convert it back to newborn fir DC2.

Ohalrightthen Mon 11-Jan-21 16:19:53

GlobeUs

*the inserts aren't suitable for more than 40min or so.*

Ok thank you - this is the info I was looking for, it just feels like different pram companies say different things. Clearly I need to get a bassinet!

Until they can hold their heads up properly, yeah.

A sling will be the best way of getting a baby round an airport - if you need a pram on the other side you could hire one maybe?

Also, i would really recommend bringing someone else with you.

MustardMitt Mon 11-Jan-21 16:32:13

Ignore me coz I started responding then left and came back and obviously the discussion has moved on!

Almostslimjim Mon 11-Jan-21 16:33:27

GlobeUs

*@Aroundtheworldin80moves* Very likely - and multiple times as well.

I thought about the baby carrier but how does that work with long lay overs, airport transfers, other baggage and delays?

HOw long are the layovers? Are you thinking overnight sleeping, or periods of longer than an hour or 2? If so then a baby who cannot roll over (so a least 4 months, if not older) must lie flat to protect their airway.

Some pram seats do lie flat which allows them to be used from birth, but if they don't then you need the bassinet attachment for them and the insert you linked to should not be used for baby to sleep, unless you are watching the pram (e.g. walking and pushing it) due to risk of suffocation.

Also some prams (most bugaboos, icandy etc) the seat part, which they advise is suitable for over 6 months, is very bucket shaped and the insert you linked to would not turn it in to a flat surface. Bugaboos for example, if you like the seat back flat, the legs end up above the head and that insert would only make that worse.

Almostslimjim Mon 11-Jan-21 16:35:39

And if you need a pram for when you get to your destination, I would buy one you can either have as hand luggage (e.g. babyzen yoyo) or a cheap secondhand one - they do not treat them nicely in the hold and know of several people whose lovely prams have been badly damaged.

FelicityPike Mon 11-Jan-21 16:41:08

I wouldn’t be taking a pram like that on a plane. It’ll get wrecked! Buy a cheap second hand and if it’s the same place you’re always flying to...have a good pram in each base.

GlobeUs Mon 11-Jan-21 16:54:51

Thank you, thank you, thank you - this is really helpful.

Clearly need to go back to the drawing board. Layovers will vary - but I am going to look at my schedule and see what is doable and what isn't. RIght now I had avoided all countries with high infection risks for the first year but I hadn't thought about the being able to sit up / pram aspect.

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HappyAsASandboy Mon 11-Jan-21 17:16:27

I would get whatever system you like for at home, and then get a simple lay-flat buggy for travel. As long as it lays flat, it will be safe for a newborn. Add in the bumbleride infant insert if you want to, though I'd feel safer with them on a smooth flat surface than that insert, personally.

I think the cheaper umbrella folds would work best, as the seats are not overly padded. Make sure it goes flat though, as lots of umbrella folds only recline to 45 degrees or so.

theboardgame Mon 11-Jan-21 18:12:11

The best travel option at least in my experience is 3 in 1 pram with overnight sleeping function bassinet. You keep the pram with bassinet until you get on the board. The baby can sleep/ relax and in my case play as I have made a play mat there. Sling is an option but not if you have to carry so many luggages.

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