Are Christmas puddings only English?

(23 Posts)
LutinDeSapin Wed 23-Dec-20 06:23:11

Or are they British and Irish too? Half my family is English and I know that side of the family have them. I made friends with an Irish lady and found a couple of cute Christmas pudding decorations I was going to give her but am suddenly worried I might offend her because it's an English thing.

OP’s posts: |
TeacupDrama Wed 23-Dec-20 06:30:46

They are Scottish too, English is not a synonym for British

LordEmsworth Wed 23-Dec-20 06:38:12

That is literally the OP's question, are they English or British confused

OP, sorry don't know but the gift sounds lovely anyway!

devildeepbluesea Wed 23-Dec-20 06:39:54

I went to 5 shops trying to find one yesterday, sold out almost everywhere. I'm in Wales.

CherryValanc Wed 23-Dec-20 06:43:51

Not sure about its origin, but Christmas puddings are eaten in Ireland and not seen as an English or British thing.

Marchitectmummy Wed 23-Dec-20 06:48:19

@TeacupDrama - you have missed the question tbe OP asked!

Perhaps British, my husband remembers having them as a child in Scotland, but his mother was English so not 100 percent sure!

miimblemomble Wed 23-Dec-20 07:14:36

My Scottish MIL always served Christmas puddings, and they certainly stack them high in M&S !

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InTheCludgie Wed 23-Dec-20 07:19:41

Growing up, Christmas pudding was always on our menu on the day and I'm Scottish.

taeglas Wed 23-Dec-20 07:28:14

Christmas puddings are part of the Irish Christmas tradition. I am Irish. My mum when I was little often made two Christmas puddings one for Christmas day and a sago plum pudding for the last day of Christmas. I think any Irish person would love to receive such a lovely gift.

Djouce Wed 23-Dec-20 07:29:44

They’re unspeakably revolting, but we certainly made and ate them annually when I was growing up in Ireland.

BalloonSlayer Wed 23-Dec-20 07:38:39

In my first job we got a free three course lunch every day.

There was a pudding called "College pudding" which when I tried it was identical to Christmas pudding.

I wondered if it ws invented at Oxford/Cambridge/Eton or somewhere.

In the Beano/Dandy of old it was called Plum Duff, this must be where "up the Duff" comes from as a variation of "in the pudding club." Beano and Dandy are Scottish.

Happytentoes Wed 23-Dec-20 07:44:47

We have them here in Scotland , but they may go by different names - plum duff as pp said, Christmas dumpling, but Christmas pudding is very common, often home made.

AdaColeman Wed 23-Dec-20 07:48:13

The Scots have the famous Clooty Dumpling as a version of Christmas pudding.

0blio Wed 23-Dec-20 07:53:12

Clootie dumpling doesn't taste like Christmas pudding though, and isn't traditionally eaten on Christmas day.

We always had a Christmas pudding (Scotland) and my mum used to put silver charms in it.

PinkyPinkerton Wed 23-Dec-20 07:57:12

LutinDeSapin

Or are they British and Irish too? Half my family is English and I know that side of the family have them. I made friends with an Irish lady and found a couple of cute Christmas pudding decorations I was going to give her but am suddenly worried I might offend her because it's an English thing.


Definitely eaten in Ireland.

vanillandhoney Wed 23-Dec-20 09:12:29

TeacupDrama

They are Scottish too, English is not a synonym for British


You were so offended by the title that you didn't even read the post hmm

RaspberryCoulis Wed 23-Dec-20 09:15:32

We always had them growing up in Scotland.

And the revolting Black Bun at New Year.

JonHammIsMyJamm Wed 23-Dec-20 09:16:58

Man, I love Christmas pudding.

ClaudiaWankleman Wed 23-Dec-20 09:19:18

Why would it be offensive to give someone that gift, even if they didn’t traditionally make Christmas puddings?

I don’t celebrate Divali but I wouldn’t be offended if someone gave me a candle and/ or some fireworks to celebrate.

wonkylegs Wed 23-Dec-20 09:30:25

They are generally eaten in lots of places that the English & Irish have taken the tradition (usually parts of the former Empire) , I know my S.African family and friends eat them out there.
Here's the wiki page in them

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_pudding

LutinDeSapin Thu 24-Dec-20 15:33:34

They’re unspeakably revolting so true! And to my family's horror, my DC have never tasted one shock I have just dropped it off, so I hope she likes it. Why would it be offensive to give someone that gift I didn't want to appear to be an arrogant (half) English brat who thought that because it's English it must also be British and Irish too...

OP’s posts: |
Anoisagusaris Thu 24-Dec-20 15:35:04

Definitely Irish too.

taczilla Thu 24-Dec-20 15:40:03

My family (Irish) eat plum pudding at Christmas and use poitin for the flame no less. I just have a swig of the poitin.

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