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At what age do children stop believing?

(101 Posts)
Whatsername17 Mon 21-Aug-17 18:19:17

Dd1 is 6 and dd2 is 7 months. Dd2 will be 11 months at Christmas this year so a little too young to 'get' the whole Santa thing. I just want a couple of years where they both believe at the same time. What are my chances?

pickledparsnip Mon 21-Aug-17 18:33:49

Last year's was the first time DS doubted FC'S existence. He was 7. I'm gutted! I believed for much longer than that when I was a kid.

SideOrderofSprouts Mon 21-Aug-17 18:36:46

Eldest was 10

Unjudgemental Mon 21-Aug-17 18:43:54

My son is starting secondary school in September (11 but youngest in his year). I tried to play it down last Christmas but I think I'm going to tell him before he goes back to school.

DamsonGin Mon 21-Aug-17 18:46:45

We're the same, going to have to tell/enlist ds1 before secondary school. Think we've done too much of a good job with it all.

ClashCityRocker Mon 21-Aug-17 18:47:39

I think I was about eight when I had suspicions, but wanted it to be true so played along until I was ten or so - can't beat a bit of willing suspension of disbelief!

christmasunicorn Mon 21-Aug-17 18:48:50

Dd questioned from 7, but completely stopped believing at 10. Ds1 is 8.5 and still believes. Whether he still does in December I don't know but I imagine if he does this will be the last year of completely believing (ie no suspicions)

Sunnydaysrock Mon 21-Aug-17 18:51:00

DS 9 still believes. Think DD13 stopped believing around 10/11.

CherieBabySpliffUp Mon 21-Aug-17 18:54:07

DD is 8 and stopped believing this Christmas because of 2 little shits kids in her class telling them all.

Whatsername17 Mon 21-Aug-17 19:01:07

I'm so glad that some kids still believe at 10! I hope dd does!

MelinaMercury Mon 21-Aug-17 19:21:22

I don't actually know when my DS stopped believing as he only actually dropped it in conversation last year (he was 10) that parents are Santa and he's never elaborated on how he found out.

I do know the kids in his class had been speculating since they were about 7 so I have wondered if he was just playing along.

TeacupDrama Mon 21-Aug-17 19:26:57

my DD is almost 8 had doubts last year but said I can believe if I want to but I know that she knows deep down he is not real but she likes the idea, and so suspends her rational thought deliberately for the fun of it; I think most 7-8 years old are the same

when she was 5-6 I would have been a bit meh but not upset if someone had told her he wasn't real but I expect these conversations between kids at this age and now in a class of 8-9 year olds it wouldn't bother me at all

I have never met a NT 10 year old who genuinely believes

kingfishergreen Mon 21-Aug-17 19:28:38

I was five when I took my mum aside and calmly informed her that she didn't have to pretend anymore, I knew FC wasn't real.

But I was a cynical little bastard.

xyzandabc Mon 21-Aug-17 19:30:12

Eldest is 10 and doesn't believe, 2 of her friends are still absolutely convinced though. I know because I listened to the 3 of them debating the issue very well on a car journey! Arguements for and against and everything!

8 yr old I think doesn't believe and has had suspicions for a year or so.

CerealShopper Mon 21-Aug-17 19:35:50

Dd is 6 and, just yesterday, asked me to tell her the truth about the tooth fairy, Father Christmas and the Easter Bunny.
We have a no lies rule, so I told her, but asked her not to tell it to anyone else who still believed, as it wouldn't be fair to spoil the magic for them.

MrsJoyOdell Mon 21-Aug-17 19:37:47

My eldest is 10 and actually still believes hmm He does have ASD though. DS2 is 9 and I'm sure he's clocked on but he hasn't said anything and I don't think he would. DS3 & DD still only 6 & 3 and totally believe, I think that's the main reason DS2 wouldn't say anything, he dotes on DD and wouldn't want to upset her.

Soozikinzii Mon 21-Aug-17 19:38:12

My eldest believed until my mum told him before he went to secondary school but when my youngest was ten he said well to be honest mum I was faking it a bit last year!

AldiAisleOfCrap Mon 21-Aug-17 19:39:38

9 or 10 on average.

Buttercupsandaisies Mon 21-Aug-17 19:39:40

DD is 12 this November and still believes. She starts Y7 next month so I'll be telling her soon!

Whataboutmeee Mon 21-Aug-17 19:42:04

I think they start hedging their bets at about 10, even 11 but they all know or have been told by secondary school.

Elvisola Mon 21-Aug-17 19:42:28

My DD is 10 and I think she still believes! She does a good impression of pretending if not. Although her expectations of Father Xmas are a little high - she's asking him for a MacBook Air this year!!

Stiddleficks Mon 21-Aug-17 19:42:47

I had this conversation with my dm the other day, I asked her when I found out and she didn't know. I don't remember anyone telling me but I do remember finding my presents one year. My dm thinks I must have worked it out and I just went along with it. I never had a discussion about it we just pretended every year til I moved out! My dp's always put my presents out after I we went to bed and I put theirs out in the morning before they got up. I hope it works that way with my dds too smile

parrotonmyshoulder Mon 21-Aug-17 19:48:55

My DD is just 8 and I think doesn't believe. She's read/ heard quite a few stories I've the last year which have led her to doubt him - Just William, Little Women and some Enid Blyton stories. She hasn't asked.

Haudyerwheesht Mon 21-Aug-17 19:56:18

Ds was either 8 or 9 but he's 10 now and still doesn't say anything about it, I just know that he knows!

ScrappyMalloy Mon 21-Aug-17 20:10:10

Both my sons were summer babies so among the youngest in their year groups, and I had to tell them both before they went to secondary school as they had no suspicions.

Even cynical DD didn't twig though until her last Christmas at primary school l, so I am obviously an excellent liar grin

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