Ending food waste is our generation's challenge

At the young age of 15, Grace Jones is an accomplished speaker about food poverty. A passionate believer in the need to reduce food waste, she's adamant that we shouldn't waste food while others go hungry.

In every classroom in the UK, two children arrive at school hungry every day. Through Unilever Project Sunlight, Grace hopes to inspire her fellow students to reduce their food waste too.

For generations, young people have grown up seeing that things need to change. Some have grown up to become leaders and make that it happen. As someone who lives in the UK, where the average family with children wastes £60 of food every month, Grace is determined to inspire a change.

"It's all about choices really," she explains, "when we visit a supermarket to buy vegetables, we might make a choice to buy a better looking carrot, leaving the misshapen ones behind, so it's likely to be destined for the bin. To me, when there are so many people going hungry in our own country, this just seems wrong. No one should have no choice but to go hungry."

She believes that if we all took small steps to conquer food waste, it would benefit everyone. "We're never too young, or too old to create new habits. The problem is that by turning a blind eye to food waste, we're also causing other problems that will come back and bite us. For example, sending edible food to landfill creates unnecessary pollution, in turn contributing to global warming. These issues are all interlinked."

Grace, who is part of her school's pupil parliament and hopes to work with The Children's Trust when she's older, thinks people can be inspired to make change. But does she believe the future can really be a brighter place? "I hope so, but it can only get there if people start doing something about these problems. We can make history, and there's no better time than today to turn our feelings into actions. We can start by cutting out food waste."

 

 

Last updated: over 1 year ago