Face, meet palm: 12 examples of everyday sexism

Today marks the three-year anniversary of the brilliant Everyday Sexism Project - hoorah!... well, sort of. The fact that it needs to exist only highlights how far we still have to go in the fight to achieve gender equality - as Mumsnetters can (unfortunately) attest.

 

1. "My boss sometimes asks me to make him a coffee, via Skype. He doesn't ask my male colleagues."

 

2. "Even when I've introduced myself as doctor, I will still be referred to as 'nurse'. My male nursing colleague on the other hand makes a point of not referring to himself as a nurse, and always gets called doctor."

 

3. "I am a solicitor. Once in court I said my piece to the judge (it is all very traditional, as you would expect). I finished with 'and those are my submissions. Unless there is anything I can assist the court with, sir' - as is traditional. The judge said to me - in open court - 'There is some hoovering you could do'."

 

4. "My male boss told my female protégé not to have kids until she is 35."

 

5. "I've been known to ask football fans the question 'who is the most capped England player?' Of course they all proudly announce Peter Shilton when actually the answer is Rachel Yankey, who has 129 to Shilton's 125. The response I get to that is often depressing, comments like 'I thought you meant real football'."

 

6. "My manager took my name off several technical reports I had written and had his name put on."

 

7. "I get asked 'Are you the secretary?' when answering the phone for colleagues. None of them have ever been asked that when answering my phone."

 

8. "I was a waitress aged 16-18 and frequently got shut in the walk-in freezer by the (male) kitchen staff so that my nipples would go hard."

 

9. "I was frequently accused of cheating on fitness tests because others refused to believe that I might be faster or fitter than any of the men."

 

10. "I wasn't allowed a corporate credit card. I was the only senior manager who was female and I wasn't given one. My male deputy was allowed one, but not me. Because I might use it for buying shoes.

 

11. "When I was interviewed by a law firm, I was asked whether my menstrual cycle would affect the way I handled matters in court because it would make me more emotional. They also wanted to know whether I was capable of working a full day because I was female."  

 

12. And finally, apparently women need their own food options

  

"How embarrassing! I have spent all these years choosing my food on the basis of what I fancied to eat and then I continued to eat as much of it as I fancied until I was full. Not once did I consult my vagina before placing my order."

 

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Last updated: 9 months ago