That bloody humming!

(94 Posts)
notnowbernard Fri 11-Jun-10 19:41:44

It's like a swarm of bees and is doing my head in

Was looking forward to lots of African rythym and beats

NoseyNooNoo Sun 13-Jun-10 11:46:39

At least they drown out that stupid band that play The Great Escape tune during the England mathces, together with the world's worst drummer.

Indaba Sun 13-Jun-10 11:58:45

I've been converted actually! I was all for banning them during the match......but

Went to the Cape Town match on Friday. Was dreading the vuvuzelas being too loud, but amazingly they are not that bad en mass. Had taken ear plugs etc but no need.

Might be different next Friday with all the English lot though!

Downside is we have lost the SA singing....and that is a sad loss!

thumbwitch Sun 13-Jun-10 13:18:00

Oh is that what they're called? Feckin nightmare noise. I mean, I seriously loathe the roar of the footy crowds anyway - and this is at least 10x worse.

MisSalLaneous Sun 13-Jun-10 13:32:11

My dad has a hearing aid and he said it's hell (he's in SA). Apparently he plans to go half-deaf for the whole month! My sympathies tend to lie with my mom! grin

Strawbezza Sun 13-Jun-10 14:07:08

It is a really annoying noise. Must be awful to be seated next to one at a match!

It is also quite a daft thing to be promoting in SA when TB wipes out thousands of locals every year and it is winter 'flu season ... I would have my antiseptic wipes at the ready or watch at home!!

Jajas Sun 13-Jun-10 16:02:52

I can't bear that bloody noise! Don't mind the football tbh and quite enjoy all the different noises, chants and rhythms that you usually get with the world cup but this racket is just horrendous angry! I can't believe that the fans like it? You just don't pick up any of the atmosphere.

bunjies Sun 13-Jun-10 16:19:33

I think my family must be the only ones who don't mind them. Doesn't bother us at all. Can't believe they're thinking about banning people from having them. Spoilsports!

sassy34264 Sun 13-Jun-10 16:45:03

I must be the only person who didn't notice it or deaf. I watched the whole game and didn't notice any particular sound and therefore have no idea what you're all on about!!

Having said that, if i'm concentrating on something i can be oblivious to people around me.

sassy34264 Sun 13-Jun-10 16:45:33

I must be the only person who didn't notice it or deaf. I watched the whole game and didn't notice any particular sound and therefore have no idea what you're all on about!!

Having said that, if i'm concentrating on something i can be oblivious to people around me.

sassy34264 Sun 13-Jun-10 16:47:55

Sorry, that's twice i've doubled messaged. Don't know if it's me or the computer! Apologies.

SouthernB Sun 13-Jun-10 17:12:06

Other than the noise, I noticed a v dodgy "side effect"of the vuvuzela today (I'm in Polokwane, where Algeria and Slovenia played earlier today).

TMI

Every so often, the blower has to get rid of all the spit that collected during the blowing, and does that by flicking it out of the vuvuzela. Sometimes it (the spit) hits the ground, sometimes the guy in from of him....

Gross! And Hello flu & TB!!

MisSalLaneous Sun 13-Jun-10 17:31:47

Oh that's disgusting, SB!

SkaterGrrrrl Sun 13-Jun-10 17:52:00

I love them. Better than the sexist chants you usually hear at England games.

My mum was going on and ON about them yesterday, and apparently had even emailed FIFA to tell them how unwatchable (unlistenable?) they made a match. hmm

And I watched part of the match last night (nope, not a fan!) and - meh. It was ok. Sort of white noise, you zone it out after a while.

BeenBeta Sun 13-Jun-10 18:49:42

Was watching the match today and it did really get on my nerves. Lots of European matches have a similar 'horn' sound from the crowds.

I wonder if it could be somehow 'turned down a bit' by TV channels. I suspect it might be if they get enough complaints. TBH the sounds coming off the pitch is fairly irrelevant. I want to hear the commentary.

chenge Sun 13-Jun-10 18:52:49

I LIVED IN SA FOR 4 YEARS,,the vuvuzela is played at every match,it was mainly played to disrupt the other team,and it must work coz many players have complained over the years,,it is a South African thing and its there to stay,frankly its irritating but you kind of get used to it,thank God hubby is NOT a big soccer fan so we will only watch the interesting teams only,,im looking forward to the next world cup already without those flipping VV'S,,

wheelsonthebus Sun 13-Jun-10 18:55:27

That noise is absolutely awful - puts you off watching with the sound on

Bomper Sun 13-Jun-10 18:57:05

They drive me bloody nuts. SiL lives in Midrand, just outside Johannesburg and bought some over last time she visited, so I get it in stereo with the kids and the tele!!! Aaaarrrghhh

orienteerer Sun 13-Jun-10 20:04:35

Must confess I can sort of blank out the noise, must be because I'm used to doing the same with Heathrow bound planes overhead.

MrsSeanBean Sun 13-Jun-10 20:09:02

>> It lasted the full 90 mins of the earlier game , surely they run out of breath !!

Yes! The sound is constant, why can you not detect a stopping and starting effect between blows (so to speak)?

I agree incredibly annoying, DH is watching match in the other room and I am getting a headache.

bran Sun 13-Jun-10 20:13:05

I've found a good white noise website. I'm using the brown noise and the oscillate function. It's very soothing and pretty much negates the buzzing, but I can still hear the commentary (not that I particularly want to).

sincitylover Sun 13-Jun-10 20:15:00

I don't mind it and bought my dcs one - they have been playing national anthem on them, pretended to be police, a political party - quite inventive.

But maybe I am a bit odd!!

melpomene Sun 13-Jun-10 20:15:28

My dh has installed a vuvuzela app on his iphone, to drive us all crzy get himself into the spirit while watching the games hmm

Smilehighclub Sun 13-Jun-10 20:18:28

It's the Vuvuzela, the noise-making trumpet of South African football fans, and was the symbol for sport in South Africa, more recently replaced with the more authentic KUDUZELA.

A vuvuzela, sometimes called a "lepatata" (its Setswana name) or a stadium horn, is a blowing horn, approximately one metre in length, commonly blown by fans at football matches in South Africa. The origin of the name is disputed. It may originate from the Zulu for "making noise," from the "vuvu" sound it makes, or from township slang related to the word for "shower."

The Vuvuzela is an instrument, but not always a musical one. Describing the atmosphere in a stadium packed with thousands of fans blowing their vuvuzelas is difficult. Up close it's an elephant, sure, but en masse the sound is more like a massive swarm of very angry bees.

And when there's action near the goal mouth, those bees go really crazy.

The ancestor of the vuvuzela is said to be the kudu horn - ixilongo in isiXhosa, mhalamhala in Tshivenda - blown to summon African villagers to meetings. The kudu horn was followed by versions in made of tin, and was later replaced by the Vuvuzela, which became very popular at football matches in the late 1990s. Made of plastic, they come in a variety of colours - black or white for fans of Orlando Pirates, yellow for Kaizer Chiefs, and so on - with little drawings on the side warning against blowing in the ear!

It's a noisy thing, so there's no surprise some don't like it. Journalist Jon Qwelane once quipped that he had taken to watching football matches at home - with the volume turned low - because of what he described as "an instrument of hell".It's the Vuvuzela, the noise-making trumpet of South African football fans, and was the symbol for sport in South Africa, more recently replaced with the more authentic KUDUZELA.

A vuvuzela, sometimes called a "lepatata" (its Setswana name) or a stadium horn, is a blowing horn, approximately one metre in length, commonly blown by fans at football matches in South Africa. The origin of the name is disputed. It may originate from the Zulu for "making noise," from the "vuvu" sound it makes, or from township slang related to the word for "shower."

The Vuvuzela is an instrument, but not always a musical one. Describing the atmosphere in a stadium packed with thousands of fans blowing their vuvuzelas is difficult. Up close it's an elephant, sure, but en masse the sound is more like a massive swarm of very angry bees.

And when there's action near the goal mouth, those bees go really crazy.

The ancestor of the vuvuzela is said to be the kudu horn - ixilongo in isiXhosa, mhalamhala in Tshivenda - blown to summon African villagers to meetings. The kudu horn was followed by versions in made of tin, and was later replaced by the Vuvuzela, which became very popular at football matches in the late 1990s. Made of plastic, they come in a variety of colours - black or white for fans of Orlando Pirates, yellow for Kaizer Chiefs, and so on - with little drawings on the side warning against blowing in the ear!

It's a noisy thing, so there's no surprise some don't like it. Journalist Jon Qwelane once quipped that he had taken to watching football matches at home - with the volume turned low - because of what he described as "an instrument of hell".

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