The burning question.....

(48 Posts)
dittany Wed 17-Mar-10 18:47:38

.... why did seventies feminists wear dungarees? Any ideas? I've seen a picture of Andrea Dworkin (who rocks) in her overalls, but I'm not getting what was particularly feminist about them, even though they were the uniform of choice. They're a bit of a pain in the neck every time you go to the loo after all.

It turns out they're making a comeback. This time around you have to wear heels and accessories or even a bikini top with them though. Definitely missing the feminist point.

(if this needs to be a real topic, we can always talk about high heels)

Portofino Wed 17-Mar-10 18:49:58

I always had the impression it was because they are completely shapeless, so as far from "dressing for men" as it was possible to get. I would look awful in dungarees though so would NEVER go there.....

JackSpratt Wed 17-Mar-10 18:50:41

Personally I like dungarees

I have a picture of me aged 8 with some rocking flared ones.

They should be worn with bumpers though. Heels are pandering to sexual peccadilloes.

EggyAllenPoe Wed 17-Mar-10 18:51:45

i have a feeling this was a fashion for 'urban country' that came with The Dukes of Hazzard - coming with 'daisy dukes', floral dresses, gingham shirts and skirts, and of course, hick-style dungarees. The latter being the only acceptable option to a feminist. so long as she didn't have bladder problems.

MrsWobbleTheWaitress Wed 17-Mar-10 18:52:36

Well I guess apart from the loo problem, they're pretty easy to wear, and comfortable, and certainly not designed simply to attract men!

dittany Wed 17-Mar-10 18:55:42

Unless you're wearing your bikini top of course. Ahem.

I got quite excited about them coming back, because I'd already been toying with the idea of getting some, but I can't really see it as a middle-aged look. So I was looking for some feminist justification instead of fashion.

MrsWobbleTheWaitress Wed 17-Mar-10 18:56:42

I think I might just look like an overgrown toddler with tits!

confused

Molesworth Wed 17-Mar-10 19:03:49

I'm not a dungaree fan, but I am ever so slightly tempted to wear a (feminist) burqa ...

StewieGriffinsMom Wed 17-Mar-10 19:11:02

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

<nostalgic>

I had a lovely black, cotton pair, with some embroidery on the front of the bib. I wore them on my first serious date, aged 14/15, in about 1974.

Sometimes I used to wear them with a smock over the top.

nickytwotimes Wed 17-Mar-10 19:11:41

Oh, the number of times I, ahem, wet the bloody straps when in a rush to the loo...

Guess they are pretty utilitarian looking, hide all shapes and sizes regardless of age, pregnancy, etc?

<rrealises can add little to discussion>
<goes away>
sad wink

blinder Wed 17-Mar-10 19:13:46

Eggyallenpoe like this?

I'm so excited!

EggyAllenPoe Wed 17-Mar-10 19:15:05

actually, reading the article you linked too, if the dungaree was depression-era workers wear - it would be adopted by the folk/country singers of the 50's-70's to identify with them (and indeed, with the Communist political views that went with that territory) and this would be the route into 70's feminism.

JackSpratt Wed 17-Mar-10 19:15:21

Mind you dh reckons my maternity dungas make me look like a 70's Felicity Kendall [deluded] so thats my feminist principles out of the window.

EggyAllenPoe Wed 17-Mar-10 19:17:15

blinder - i think the lady on the right has styled hers to be more alluring. At least more alluring than the horse, who is a rather handsome beast to contend with.

JackSpratt Wed 17-Mar-10 19:18:51

Pitchfork lady has a nipped in waist.

Thats cheating.

EggyAllenPoe Wed 17-Mar-10 19:21:22

my Mum had dungarees - not sure if they were maternity though she wore them whilst pregnant.

They might be better than maternity jeans. Mine keep on falling down. Easier to get to the loo in, but don't like looking like a builder all the time (until i am pg enough to fill them out).

DD has red cord dungarees which are just brilliant - and her brother will look nice in them too.

Seems fitting that dittany started the first thread! smile Well done for requesting a separate topic.

Think dungarees were partly a sign of the times and partly a political statement. At least in the US, denim was fairly utilitarian/pragmatic, although seem to remember my mother saying that the US cotton industry was unionized, and she wouldn't buy any non union anything.

Leggings are the new denim though.

Beachcomber Wed 17-Mar-10 19:23:30

Hi everyone, great first topic grin.

Didn't women first start wearing dungarees and overalls during the war when they started working in factories and on farms due to all the men being away?

blinder Wed 17-Mar-10 19:24:04

My little baby girl looks great in denim dungarees. They were the first item I bought when I got pregnant. They have to be the most practical 'trouser'. No uncomfortable waist, no pants visible.

Eggy your route from the depression via folk to feminism sounds right. We have solved the first debate. Next!

ImSoNotTelling Wed 17-Mar-10 19:44:52

When I was pg with DD2 I scoured the internet for maternity dungarees, preferably flared corduroy ones.

I couldn't find any.

So I asked on here and everyone said I was bonkers grin

Bring em back I say - I loathe maternity trousers - you're either constantly pulling the bit up over the bump or stopping them falling down. And I don't really do skirts...

I think we should reclaim this new wave of dungarees, and horrify the masses by wearing them with some clothes on underneath!!!

JackSpratt Wed 17-Mar-10 19:46:22

Mine were vintage.

Worn with cheesecloth and a smirk.

Takver Wed 17-Mar-10 20:03:08

I still wear dungarees blush They aren't really dungarees, though, honest, they are Swedish 'work overalls' grin

I had maternity dungarees, too (two pairs in fact). For some reason the maternity versions don't come with a hammer loop though . . .

As to why feminists wear them - perhaps, boringly, because until recently it was very hard to get work trousers in small enough sizes if you're a woman, and dungarees are more flexible in size?

CMOTdibbler Wed 17-Mar-10 20:09:01

I was never allowed dungarees as a child as I never thought about going to the loo far enough ahead to negotiate them blush

I think they may also have been adopted as a rebellion against the expectations of how women should dress

Takver Wed 17-Mar-10 20:09:20

Dittany, can I recommend these for your dungaree craving. They appear to be completely indestructable, too.

On a similar note, why is women's workwear always badged as 'ladies workwear'? And I quote "Performance Work Clothing offers a full range of Ladies workwear specifically tailored for Women." What is all that about . . .

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