Friday 11 October is International day of the girl child 2013

(4 Posts)
SaraIKWRO Fri 11-Oct-13 16:02:30

Today's the day - it's International Day of the Girl! I work at IKWRO (www.ikwro.org.uk) a charity supporting Middle Eastern & Afghan women & girls living in the UK who face 'honour' based violence. We're worried that 16 & 17 year old girls, who are at particularly at risk of forced marriage, are not being protected as they should by UK law. If you'd like to know more please read http://www.womensviewsonnews.org/2013/10/child-marriage-not-just-someone-elses-problem/ and please support us on FB & Twitter. Thank you!

More reading if you like.... nothing new... but clear if you were informing anyone, say children or young people etc, about why girls should get assistance because barriers to their education are greater!

www.unicef.org/esaro/7310_Gender_and_education.html

"At school level infrastructure deficits often hamper girls’ school attendance and achievements. Less than half of all schools in the region provide for access to safe water and less than 40 percent have adequate sanitation facilities. All too often, girls in particular are forced to skip classes or drop out of school altogether because there are no separate toilets for them which guarantee a minimum of privacy, a problem which becomes particularly pertinent once girls reach puberty.

Moreover, harassment and insecurity may deter girls from attending school. Many girls are facing sexual and physical abuse from teachers and peers, both in school and on the journey to and from home. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) sexual coercion and harassment are most commonly experienced at home and in school. Research in Uganda found that 8 percent of 16 and 17 year-olds had had sex with their teachers. According to a study by Plan International, at least one-third of all child rapes in South Africa in a given time were committed by school staff. However, most victims never speak out because they feel ashamed or scared of being stigmatized.

Early marriage and pregnancy can also lead to girls dropping out of school. Some countries, including Malawi, Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda and Kenya have introduced policies which facilitate the re-admission of young mothers after giving birth, Between January and June 2007, over 326 pupils in Malawi came back as a result of this policy. Other countries however are still lacking behind."

Oopse

here

Check it out, please

[[http://www.un.org/en/events/girlchild/ here]

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