One year old is veg-resistant

(13 Posts)

I'm a bit worried I've cocked things up with DS2. He's 13mo and sort of BLW'd, but I did spoon the odd bit of mush in and he can now spoon-feed himself some things.

The problem is, I think I have been a bit over-relaxed about what he's been given, and he loves salty things (ie cheese) and strong flavours, and yummy cereal full of sugar (not Frosties, I'm not THAT bad; but the mini shredded wheats with the fruit inside, and shreddies - that sort of thing), fruit etc

He will occasionally eat a bit of broccoli but not much other veg - the odd bit of carrot in stew.

My question is - how to I rewind and reset him? He's twigged that nicer things exist so if I give him something that he's not wild about he'll yell for something he prefers.

Do I stand firm and give him what I want him to eat and not offer an alternative? Or do I try things and then give him a sandwich? I don't want to send him the message that he can refuse, shout and something better will appear

??

nextphase Thu 07-Mar-13 11:38:48

What happens if you make e.g. cauliflower cheese? ie mix it with something he does like? Or make veg curry? Samosas? veg in nice forms?
Would he eat roasted root veg? which is quite sweet?

We have always taken the atitude they need to try everything, but we don't force finishing things. Pudding is always offered. They both go through phases of eating loads of carbs, and then the following week seem to shun carbs, and go for protein. It seems to balance out over a week or month.

JiltedJohnsJulie Thu 07-Mar-13 12:53:52

Agree that trying the above things are a good idea but just to answer your question on refusing food, he's playing you! Offer the food, and if he refuses ignore the whining and never, ever offer an alternative (unless they are ill of course).

Have you tried offering something he will eat along with the veg, so give him a sandwich with some chunks of cucumber. That way at least eats something. We just serve the food and then eat, chat and ignore any comments or whining. We don't even comment on what has or hasn't been eaten.

Just wondering too what milk he is on and how much as this can affect fussiness with food.

JiltedJohnsJulie Thu 07-Mar-13 13:13:15

Have you tried sweetening his breakfast cereal with fruit too? Both of mine like ready brek with raisins, chopped bananas or berries.

Thanks everyone. I'll definitely try some cauliflower cheese, I think, and roasted veg is a good idea (no oven at the moment so tricky, but hopefully sorted soon)

He was bf'd til and year and now has cow's milk which he drinks on his own terms via a tommy tippee cup, about 2 cups a day (not much I know but he likes drinking water too, and has lots of cheese(!), yoghurt etc)

I KNOW I'm being played, I think I just want reassurance that others don't give alternatives and all is well, and that I'm not being a cruel and evil parent!

I think I've been spoilt by angel DS1 who happily munches boiled courgettes and generally eats everything.

I shall continue with the ignoring and grow a pair grin

JiltedJohnsJulie Thu 07-Mar-13 14:04:44

Was really asking about the milk because you sometime get MNers saying their one year old wont eat, then when you ask they are on 4bottles of toddler milk a day shock

If it's any consolation I lovingly pureed 1000 different types of veg for my twins, one of them will happily eat salad and try most things, one will only eat a couple of fruits, sometimes peas and sweetcorn. I don't think at 13mo they understand 'good' and 'bad' food, and their palates change all the time anyhow.

JiltedJohnsJulie Thu 07-Mar-13 15:06:54

Not only do their palates change but they understand that no and creaming can have power too. As in I'll scream, watch mum wobble and see if I get ice cream! grin

Thanks guys. He ate some tiny bits of cucumber and tomato with lunch, and bread soaked in carrot soup.

Then for dinner I made tomatoey pasta sauce with a load of carrots and broccoli blended into it and he ate an adult-sized portion shock

Feeling much better now

JiltedJohnsJulie Thu 07-Mar-13 20:22:54

That's good news smile

You are definitely not being an evil parent grin
I've never offered an alternative (unless ill), just assumed if food is rejected that they are not hungry. I do always make sure there is something they would enjoy eating on their plate (not hard tbh as they are not fussy) as it would be miserable to have a whole meal presented that you weren't very keen on tries to forget my PMT fuelled rant at DH on the week he served jacket potatoes for the third time when I DON'T LIKE THEM! blushgrin
But I don't serve just their favourites, IYSWIM.

JiltedJohnsJulie Thu 07-Mar-13 20:58:55

Think that's quite minor for a pmt rant, I could cheerfully stab my DH for much less than that shockgrin

grin JJJ

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